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Thread: Modern materials Khukuri

  1. #61
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    Fort Lauderdale, FL
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    Mmmmmm INFI kukri..... Love mine, is it worth the extra scratch over a HI, not really, doesn't make me love it any less though, I will say I've thinned mine out a bit and its a laser against light vegetation yet still chops wood like an axe. I'm sure there are plenty of custom makers though that can make you ( the OP) a kuk out of all the newest materials you desire if you want to go that route. ( micarta or g10 and high tech steel)




  2. #62
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    OC, California
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    941
    Buy an Astk then rehandle it. Just like the one above.

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    Englewood, CO
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    I've got an ATSK that's due for rehandling here. This thread reminds me I should do that...
    Beckerhead #149
    HTM/DDR Crew Member

    Tax Season Sale! Khukuri, Camp knife, Large and Small Persians, all in the Exchange.

  4. #64
    Can someone explain what an "ATSK" is?

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    Fort Lauderdale, FL
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    Quote Originally Posted by kookery View Post
    Can someone explain what an "ATSK" is?
    Amar Singh Thapa Knife ( at least that's what I saw it stood for) middle blade in my above pics

  6. #66
    Why was that one recommended?

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Denmark
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    173
    How about the Cold Steel Gurka Kukris? Anyone tested those out?

  8. #68
    I haven't tested them but I studied them before settling on my WWII. My conclusion was that their high-end kukris are nice, but they're not as good of quality as the Himalayan Imports knives, especially in the steel and heat treating. Plus, they're more expensive.

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    Denmark
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    173
    I'll look into Himalayan Imports then

    cheers!

  10. #70
    Extrima Ratio also made modern khunkri

    http://ep.yimg.com/ca/I/yhst-9132430...9_2232_1458987

  11. #71
    Is that one yours? Have you used it?

  12. #72
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
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    Texas Hill Country
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    1,173
    Quote Originally Posted by Senserazer View Post
    How about the Cold Steel Gurka Kukris? Anyone tested those out?
    I have two CS khukuri. The Gurkha in SK5 and an old Light Terrain Chopper (LTC) in Carbon V. They are both superb blades. My LTC, being 1/8" thick and 17 oz., is probably my most useful large blade. It is shaped like the current Kukri Machete model, slices grass like a razor, and actually bites hard wood deeper than my other choppers. It's not a chopper, per se, as it doesn't blast wood chunks when chopping, but for my nothing-like-a-pine-forest locale, it's perfect. The heavier (23 oz.) Gurkha, while not a machete, handles machete tasks quite well. It also chops very well, but is flat ground and doesn't clear as much wood during a chop as a thick, convex blade. Both of these blades are light and very well balanced. I've been very pleased with the strength and edge holding ability of both blades. They handle the hardest wood I have available, seasoned oak and mesquite (this ain't pine), without any edge deformation and actually retain their sharpness extremely well. The handles work great for me except when chopping. They are a tad small, but I did a paracord wrap on my Gurkha and it feels much better. The handles can't compete with the handle on my Tirtha WWII, but the Kraton/rubber is tough and will not slip during use. I love my CS khuks. They don't have the spirit of the hand made khuks, but they are incredible tools. I have seriously abused the LTC and it's as servicable today as it was when I bought it in the early/mid 1990's. Take care.

  13. #73
    Quote Originally Posted by kookery View Post
    Is that one yours? Have you used it?
    no that is not my, I was thinking about buying it, some times ago, but later found not so good reports about steel quality.

    personally I would rather buy Cold Steel VG-1 San Mai Kukri, but I cannot import it. Limit for import here - blade no longer then 9".

  14. #74
    Quote Originally Posted by maxititer View Post
    Extrima Ratio also made modern khunkri

    http://ep.yimg.com/ca/I/yhst-9132430...9_2232_1458987
    Looks heavy toward the bolster/handle for a chopper to me. The traditional kuks put the most steel out on the end where the chop happens.

    And on their website they describe the kukri as: "simply a machete with a forward cut"



    That doesn't describe the kukris I own.
    Last edited by GoodStuff; 10-16-2012 at 11:33 AM.

  15. #75
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    Jan 2012
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    619
    Quote Originally Posted by kookery View Post
    I've always wanted a kukri (khukuri, kookery, etc). Everybody says the pinnacle of kukri-craft comes from Himalayan Imports. But, looking around, I see the "blems" postings where the natural material handles are showing their propensity to crack and have other sorts of problems. What I'm hoping to find is a "modern pinnacle" that has a synthetic handle (kraton maybe), and possibly an option for corrosion resistant stainless steel metallurgy for the blade... I might like a hilt guard design that will prevent me from sliding my hand from the handle to the blade.
    Many Kukri aficionados, collectors, and users want the Khukuri to stay the Khukuri. Which means we want to buy and use the same designs/materials/weights/balance that the famous Nepali Gurkha's used in battle. Also, the hard working Villager's khukuri is just as good if not better for it's designed use. So what you are asking is really the next step in getting away from traditional skilled Kami blade work and furthering the export/tourist Kukri ideas of the westerner to the Khukuri. To me that's not the direction I want to go and it really puts a nail in the coffin of the real Khukuri. I know you don't mean this but the Nepali Khukuri is fading away because of western influences. The honest business people in Nepal are caught in the middle trying to stay true to the real Khukuri and also trying to make money selling to the foreign market. By the way people in Nepal don't use the Khukuri very much anymore. They are using the billhook, the sickle, and the axe today.

    It would also be nice if it had a matte black or blued (chemical or heat) finish for additional corrosion resistance, but I could do that with spray paint if I had to. There's a chance I might use a kukri for chopping up big salt water fish (in the water or out), so in addition to metallurgical and coating corrosion resistance, it would be nice if it could be disassembled for rinsing to prevent corrosion from forming in hidden parts under the handle. A modern Khukuri should have a modern sheath too.

    Above: Fish preparation with a carbon Kukri at 2:11 on video
    Some other options for you are either chrome plating your new kukri (which ever one you like). Gurkhas and the Nepali Army does this to keep their knives inspection ready.
    Or use an ultra modern application to a blade to protect it from the elements like Black-T, this is a VERY well done Teflon coating. It's the toughest in the industry. Both cost so weigh your other options. For me if I where in a sea/salt water environment I would go with a high quality stainless steel and even then have a Marine Tuf-Cloth to wipe it down after use.
    Chrome Plate Very unique.jpg
    Does something like what I'm describing already exist?
    Not in Nepal for now of which I am grateful. Sorry, I'm a traditionalist in regards to the Kukri but this is my opinion not saying I'm right I just have an opinion. You said: "A modern Khukuri should have a modern sheath too"The Khukuri is a traditional tool to make it "modern" in the way you're asking would not make it a Kukri .

  16. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by jdk1 View Post
    I have two CS khukuri. The Gurkha in SK5 and an old Light Terrain Chopper (LTC) in Carbon V. They are both superb blades. My LTC, being 1/8" thick and 17 oz., is probably my most useful large blade. It is shaped like the current Kukri Machete model, slices grass like a razor, and actually bites hard wood deeper than my other choppers. It's not a chopper, per se, as it doesn't blast wood chunks when chopping, but for my nothing-like-a-pine-forest locale, it's perfect. The heavier (23 oz.) Gurkha, while not a machete, handles machete tasks quite well. It also chops very well, but is flat ground and doesn't clear as much wood during a chop as a thick, convex blade. Both of these blades are light and very well balanced. I've been very pleased with the strength and edge holding ability of both blades. They handle the hardest wood I have available, seasoned oak and mesquite (this ain't pine), without any edge deformation and actually retain their sharpness extremely well. The handles work great for me except when chopping. They are a tad small, but I did a paracord wrap on my Gurkha and it feels much better. The handles can't compete with the handle on my Tirtha WWII, but the Kraton/rubber is tough and will not slip during use. I love my CS khuks. They don't have the spirit of the hand made khuks, but they are incredible tools. I have seriously abused the LTC and it's as servicable today as it was when I bought it in the early/mid 1990's. Take care.
    +1 On this. Cold Steel Kukris are the best of the KLOs period.

  17. #77
    Quote Originally Posted by sweetcostarica View Post
    By the way people in Nepal don't use the Khukuri very much anymore. They are using the billhook, the sickle, and the axe today.
    Sometimes specialization is the right way to go. I think the kukri should be adequate for me in replacing most large knives and a hatchet.

  18. #78
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    WV
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    Quote Originally Posted by kookery View Post
    Sometimes specialization is the right way to go. I think the kukri should be adequate for me in replacing most large knives and a hatchet.
    Not to mention how much cooler you feel with a Khukuri on your side while hiking compared to a hacthet.

  19. #79
    Quote Originally Posted by sweetcostarica View Post
    +1 On this. Cold Steel Kukris are the best of the KLOs period.
    whats a KLO?

  20. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by kookery View Post
    Sometimes specialization is the right way to go. I think the kukri should be adequate for me in replacing most large knives and a hatchet.
    What I am going to say is not from personal experience because I don't live in Nepal or a developing world so input from someone who does/has can help us here...
    But it is my guess that the person you see in Nepal (or another less wealthy country) using just a Kukri or only one tool is most likely too poor to own any other tool and need an all round instrument. He/She can not afford to add a sickle, a saw, a billhook, an axe, a weed whacker, a chain saw, etc. to their household. Specialization is for the developed nations or individual that can afford it. Soapbox ended.
    farm tools.jpg
    So for us folks with the money the Kukri is for collecting, for fun, and/or for use. Focusing on use the Kukri is a very important multifunctional camp/hiking tool that saves on weight.
    Kukri food.jpg
    For your stated purpose above Kookery the Kukri would work well in light to medium duty applications. I am a fanboy for the Kukri but don't limit yourself either. Their are many great blade designs albeit the Khukuri is the most famous. Good luck and stay safe.

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