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Thread: Modern materials Khukuri

  1. #81
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    whats a KLO?
    It means a Kukri Like Object. There are many different definitions that would qualify for the label of KLO but the main ones are:
    1) Not made in Nepal
    2) Not made by a Nepali Kami
    3) Kukri machetes, etc.
    You get the idea.

    Note:As with everything there are exceptions like those Indian fellows near Nepal that make Kukris.

    Which is the real deal and which is the KLO?
    KLO.jpgNot a KLO.jpg

  2. #82
    Wow, the angles are totally wrong on that Mykel Hawk. What an embarrassment.

  3. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by sweetcostarica View Post
    Which is the real deal and which is the KLO?
    KLO.jpg
    Quote Originally Posted by kookery View Post
    Wow, the angles are totally wrong on that Mykel Hawk. What an embarrassment.
    I agree! That looks awful!!

  4. #84
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    Recently i've been asked to share about khukuris to a group of local forumites and i think i pissed them off by telling them the CS Magnum Khukuri and the khukuri machete that they owned is actually a machaira and a falcata-inspired blade.In fact the TTKZ has the look of both and hence it can only be called as KLO.
    Not every profile with a curved spine is a khukuri and from H.I website there's a dedicated page of dimensioned and measured models for the best potential of this blade.
    I must agree however that the Cold Steel Gurkha Kukri VG1 and the Blackjack version had gone through studies and produced to its exact weight and profile of goodness.

    I would like to see a khukuri forged in Elmax.

  5. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by sweetcostarica View Post
    I have no idea how this blade could even be used. It might work at chopping sheet metal, but I've no clue how it could do anything else efficiently. I normally wouldn't want to bash someone's design without any experience with it, but it's a wierd one for sure! Another knike he designed has strange angles as well. I have a CS Tanto Voyager that I really like, but the angle at the belly makes it much less useful than it could be. The blades I've seen him design just seem very limited. I like his show a lot though.

    As for the CS Gurkha, it appears based on the Mk. II type khuk. IIRC, Lynn Thompson designed the blade along with Dr. Gyi (sp?). Dr. Gyi has been photographed using a vintage M43 during bando demonstrations. It also comes close to the specs of an original M43. I agree with Jay's opinion on the Magnum Kukri Machete as it really has that Falcata look, but think the standard Kukri Machete looks enough like a khukuri to qualify as such IMHO. It and the old LTC have a bit of Bonecutter/Ganga Ram belly to my eye. Of course, many believe the khukuri was based on the Machaira/Falcata design brought by Alexander the Great anyway, so it's splitting hairs. Take care.

  6. #86
    Quote Originally Posted by jdk1 View Post
    I have no idea how this blade could even be used.
    You could chase me down the street with it...
    Looks scary.

  7. #87
    What is:

    Elmax
    Bonecutter

    The belly on the angular KLO would require you to drop the knife perfectly straight down, which could probably be done in a guillotine. It would have to be moved further forward to work with a natural human arm swing.

  8. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by kookery View Post
    What is:

    Elmax
    Bonecutter

    The belly on the angular KLO would require you to drop the knife perfectly straight down, which could probably be done in a guillotine. It would have to be moved further forward to work with a natural human arm swing.
    Elmax is a powdered stainless steel
    Bonecutter is one of the types of HI kukris

  9. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by jdk1 View Post
    I have no idea how this blade could even be used. It might work at chopping sheet metal, but I've no clue how it could do anything else efficiently. I normally wouldn't want to bash someone's design without any experience with it, but it's a wierd one for sure! Another knike he designed has strange angles as well. I have a CS Tanto Voyager that I really like, but the angle at the belly makes it much less useful than it could be. The blades I've seen him design just seem very limited. I like his show a lot though.
    ruth_england_ruth_england_mykel_hawke.jpgmykel-tasmania.jpg
    Above Picture of Specops Mykel Hawke, US Army Special Forces veteran

    Looks like a stealth Kukri before the black radar absorbing paint was applied. I don't what to get this guy mad at me either but I think he is trying to be different from the "pack" by putting out unique but not so efficient designs. Personally, I like this guy and his show too. He seems like a very honorable guy.

    Quote Originally Posted by jdk1
    As for the CS Gurkha, it appears based on the Mk. II type khuk. IIRC, Lynn Thompson designed the blade along with Dr. Gyi (sp?). Dr. Gyi has been photographed using a vintage M43 during bando demonstrations. It also comes close to the specs of an original M43. I agree with Jay's opinion on the Magnum Kukri Machete as it really has that Falcata look, but think the standard Kukri Machete looks enough like a khukuri to qualify as such IMHO. It and the old LTC have a bit of Bonecutter/Ganga Ram belly to my eye. Of course, many believe the khukuri was based on the Machaira/Falcata design brought by Alexander the Great anyway, so it's splitting hairs. Take care.
    gyi.jpgrespect drgyi.jpgmaunggyi_bamboo.jpg
    Above picture: Dr. Maung Gyi. He was a full-time professor at OU for many years. President of USKA and founder of American Bando. Is said to be a veteran of WWII, Korea, Vietnam, Gurkhas, etc. and has actual combat experience. I think this is another great guy but his advice in Kukri design is more sound.

    Note:
    USKA is the United States Karate Alliance
    Bando (pronounced bon do) is a multi-faceted martial art, with roots in China, Burma, and India. The system was brought to America in the late 1950’s by Maung Gyi (now Dr. U M. Gyi, (Grandmaster) from Burma who later formed the American Bando Association [ABA].

  10. Quote Originally Posted by sweetcostarica View Post
    What I am going to say is not from personal experience because I don't live in Nepal or a developing world so input from someone who does/has can help us here...
    But it is my guess that the person you see in Nepal (or another less wealthy country) using just a Kukri or only one tool is most likely too poor to own any other tool and need an all round instrument. He/She can not afford to add a sickle, a saw, a billhook, an axe, a weed whacker, a chain saw, etc. to their household. Specialization is for the developed nations or individual that can afford it. Soapbox ended.
    Attachment 307581
    So for us folks with the money the Kukri is for collecting, for fun, and/or for use. Focusing on use the Kukri is a very important multifunctional camp/hiking tool that saves on weight.
    Attachment 307582
    For your stated purpose above Kookery the Kukri would work well in light to medium duty applications. I am a fanboy for the Kukri but don't limit yourself either. Their are many great blade designs albeit the Khukuri is the most famous. Good luck and stay safe.
    Much of Nepal is only accessible by foot. Or in these days helicopter, if you're wealthy enough to charter one. To get from one place to another even the well-to-do will be hiking up mountain passes and down through river valleys, sometimes several times in a day. You take with you what you can carry, or what you can pay someone else to carry for you. In this situation the khukuri is a great compromise between weight and the tasks a traveler might encounter when traveling through the wilderness. The khukuri is not only for the destitute.
    Howard Wallace
    *************

  11. #91
    I would be curious to find out what size and type is the good compromise that Nepalis use. There's a lot of variety from Himalayan Imports, and it looks to me like there's a lot of variety in local Nepali usage too. We need someone in a helicopter to go through each of those wilderness mountain passes to take a survey of all the kukris in use

  12. #92
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    Thanks Howard for the peak into travel in Nepal's outback and why the Kukri is a favorite. Your comment reminded me of something I read and that was a lot foreign money coming into Nepal these days is from tourist hiking the mountains. This is starting to pick up more and more everyday as the Government stabilizes.

    The Traditional Kukri and some "KLOs" are my top pick in large Knives (second is the Parang) because of the very reason you state above.

  13. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by kookery View Post
    I would be curious to find out what size and type is the good compromise that Nepalis use. There's a lot of variety from Himalayan Imports, and it looks to me like there's a lot of variety in local Nepali usage too. We need someone in a helicopter to go through each of those wilderness mountain passes to take a survey of all the kukris in use
    To answer your question would take a lot of time and effort to do it right Kookery. But luckily there are more knowledgeable and experienced people out there that can cover this topic of what is used (and not used) in Nepal as far as cutting tools.


    The above is from a video series on what Gurkha's and Nepalis actually use in Nepal

    The video(s) covers a competing companies owner views from his studies and experience. Since he is not promoting his products I believe it is OK to post for general information. If not the moderator can take it down of course. But I found the information very helpful in understand the fighting, farming, and multipurpose Khukuri.

  14. #94
    As for the CS Gurkha, it appears based on the Mk. II type khuk. IIRC, Lynn Thompson designed the blade along with Dr. Gyi (sp?). Dr. Gyi has been photographed using a vintage M43 during bando demonstrations. It also comes close to the specs of an original M43. I agree with Jay's opinion on the Magnum Kukri Machete as it really has that Falcata look, but think the standard Kukri Machete looks enough like a khukuri to qualify as such IMHO. It and the old LTC have a bit of Bonecutter/Ganga Ram belly to my eye. Of course, many believe the khukuri was based on the Machaira/Falcata design brought by Alexander the Great anyway, so it's splitting hairs. Take care.
    Very true, M43, CS, KLVUK, DuiChirra

    Top CS, bottom M43

    CS=lighter, faster and balance. M43=substantial, can cut a tree down in no time.

  15. #95
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    +1
    Nice peak . Excellent comparison and back up to jdk1.
    Now what are the weight comparisons? That should be interesting.

  16. #96
    That is a nice collection. Maybe I'll have a collection like that someday. I'm not sure why I need a collection, though. I guess this is one of those things that just happens after a while of admiring other people's collections

  17. #97
    Quote Originally Posted by kookery View Post
    That is a nice collection. Maybe I'll have a collection like that someday. I'm not sure why I need a collection, though. I guess this is one of those things that just happens after a while of admiring other people's collections
    Gentlemen,
    I think we have successfully spread HI fever.

  18. #98
    I feel so dirty. Was it good for you too?

  19. #99
    Hey Kook, did you get your WW2 yet?

  20. #100
    No, not yet. That's why I'm still awake. I just KNOW tomorrow is the big day...

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