Page 8 of 8 FirstFirst ... 45678
Results 141 to 153 of 153

Thread: What is sharpening a knife about? (2015 updates!)

  1. #141

    Support BladeForums!
    Paid memberships don't see ads!
    Yes, I'm getting better at sharpening. I can cut paper with 1000# stone now. Thank you to everyone who has posted in this thread.

    BO-DACIOUS

  2. #142
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Siberia
    Posts
    15
    This helped me out a lot! Great write-up! This makes a world of difference to a beginner like me!!

  3. #143
    From Russia with love. Tormek thanks for idea (https://youtu.be/YUUctwKJglI)

  4. #144
    Really helpful information for noobs like me. I appreciate it a lot.

  5. #145
    This article was very helpful. I have had hit and miss success over the years sharpening my knives. Mostly kitchen knives but also some moderately nice pocket knives. I recently purchased a Benchmade Emissary and have a Mini-Barrage on the way. I have had two Lansky kits for many years.

    But, after reading this article, I used a sharpie to mark the blade to see where the stone what hitting the edge. I found that on my Emissary, Leatherman Skeltool CX and kitchen knives the stone does not touch the edge when using the 20 degree setting. It is my understanding from reading that 40 degrees is the arguably optimal angle for an EDC. It's my assumption that 20 x 2 on the Lansky would give me the 40 degree edge I'm looking for. I spent almost 30 minutes per side with the extra course stone and never touched the edge. However, once I went to the 25 degree setting on the Lansky I was able to get a good sharp knife.

    Am I doing something wrong? Do I need to just spend more time on the 20 degree and Extra Course until I grind the edge down to the point where it touches the actual edge? Should I just leave it alone and be happy with a 50 degree edge? Any input appreciated.

    Cheers, Kevin

  6. #146
    Quote Originally Posted by kmahler View Post
    This article was very helpful. I have had hit and miss success over the years sharpening my knives. Mostly kitchen knives but also some moderately nice pocket knives. I recently purchased a Benchmade Emissary and have a Mini-Barrage on the way. I have had two Lansky kits for many years.

    But, after reading this article, I used a sharpie to mark the blade to see where the stone what hitting the edge. I found that on my Emissary, Leatherman Skeltool CX and kitchen knives the stone does not touch the edge when using the 20 degree setting. It is my understanding from reading that 40 degrees is the arguably optimal angle for an EDC. It's my assumption that 20 x 2 on the Lansky would give me the 40 degree edge I'm looking for. I spent almost 30 minutes per side with the extra course stone and never touched the edge. However, once I went to the 25 degree setting on the Lansky I was able to get a good sharp knife.

    Am I doing something wrong? Do I need to just spend more time on the 20 degree and Extra Course until I grind the edge down to the point where it touches the actual edge? Should I just leave it alone and be happy with a 50 degree edge? Any input appreciated.

    Cheers, Kevin
    You definitely understand the basics. My only input... I think on the Lansky, the degree settings are based on the edge of the clamp. So, with a knife inserted that sticks out beyond the clamp edge, the actual angle will be lower than the reading on the device. If you have a way of independently checking the angle, (digital angle gauge, protractor, etc.), you could get a better idea of what the actual sharpening angle is.

    You are right, the 20 deg. setting is per side. If you're happy with how the blade performs, there's no law that says it has to be 20 deg. (Most here go even lower anyway... depending on the knife). If the 25 deg. setting works well for you, no reason to change it. (At some point, sharpen a knife lower, and see if you like it better). The work you did at 20 deg. setting will thin the blade and make it cut better anyway, in most cases, even though you finished at 25 deg. setting.

    1st though, I'd check and see what angle you're actually sharpening at.

  7. #147
    Quote Originally Posted by cbwx34 View Post
    You definitely understand the basics. My only input... I think on the Lansky, the degree settings are based on the edge of the clamp. So, with a knife inserted that sticks out beyond the clamp edge, the actual angle will be lower than the reading on the device. If you have a way of independently checking the angle, (digital angle gauge, protractor, etc.), you could get a better idea of what the actual sharpening angle is.
    That's a great point. I had considered this but, didn't realize just how much it was contributing to the angle. I haven't been able to measure it yet but eyeballing it I can tell it's a pretty significant difference as you move away from the end of the jaw.

  8. #148
    I'm trying explain what is sharpening the knives about.

  9. #149
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    albuquerque,nm
    Posts
    679
    I have a question. All I have now to sharpen
    My knives is a smith brand dual grit combo
    Synthetic abrasive stone and according to
    The smith website it is used in the same
    Manner as a diamond stone so now for my
    Question is this stone sufficient enough to
    Get my knives razor sharp? I'm going to reread
    The entire thread again but are there any other
    Tips or techniques I should be using? Thanks

    Frank

  10. #150
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    albuquerque,nm
    Posts
    679
    Forgot to mention that on my smith
    Dual grit stone it's only 100 grit and
    The other side is 240 grit so will these
    Grits get my knives sharp ? Thanks

    Frank

  11. #151
    In all honesty, it depends. With all our talk about shaving, hair popping, etc we sometimes forget that a sharp knife is a knife that does the task we are using it for in an efficient manner. That said, 240 is pretty coarse. Like lawnmower blade coarse almost. I usually take knives up to 400 or 600 grit for everyday use.

    Sent from my SCH-I435 using Tapatalk

  12. #152
    Quote Originally Posted by drfreemlizard View Post
    In all honesty, it depends. With all our talk about shaving, hair popping, etc we sometimes forget that a sharp knife is a knife that does the task we are using it for in an efficient manner. That said, 240 is pretty coarse. Like lawnmower blade coarse almost. I usually take knives up to 400 or 600 grit for everyday use.

    Sent from my SCH-I435 using Tapatalk
    Agreed! 600 grit (and I prefer to follow that by judicious stropping with a 1 micron diamond paste or spray as a final step) makes for a fantastic edge!

  13. #153
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    albuquerque,nm
    Posts
    679
    Update: I just got a mini-sharp folding diamond
    Sharpener it's a red fine grit which I believe is
    600 grit but I'm not sure on that it's made by
    Camillus it was a Valentine's Day gift from my
    Wife so today after about 50 or 60 passes each
    On my smith stone on the 240 grit side so that
    I see a new scratch pattern on the bevel and
    Now I'll be using the mini folding diamond Sharpener
    And see how it does and then strop my blades on a
    Old leather belt and I'll report back on how everything
    Went but I just found out that the wicked edge blade
    Sharpening system headquarters are in the same state
    As I am and about 50 mIles away so if I don't like my
    Results I'll either send my knives to wicked edge by
    Mail or just take a drive up there and have them
    Resharpen my knives and possibly reprofile the bevels
    If needed but I will be gething more home sharpening
    Equipment so I can do it myself in the future and continue
    To practice and get better

    Frank Cervantes

Page 8 of 8 FirstFirst ... 45678

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 2 users browsing this thread. (1 members and 1 guests)

  1. sanman28

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •