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Thread: What's bigger than a felling axe?

  1. #21
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    I can see swinging a 6-7 pounder downwards but not sideways. You'll want to develop the strength of an ox for that.

  2. #22
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    Gransfors felling axe weights 2,1-2,2Kg, there is room to add weight until tree felling can become awkward.

  3. #23
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    Elwell made some big ones. Was watching a 7lb felling head on the auction site the other week.

  4. #24
    Some rafting axes?

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moonw View Post
    Some rafting axes?
    Nope! 4-5-6 lb was the extent of it for these, including miner and constructor versions.

  6. #26
    Well. My bad, I read this wrong. I stand corrected. Some rafting axes are bigger/heavier than some felling axes.

  7. #27
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    hults bruk makes the 4 pound arvika bu it sounds like you want something huge, maybe this georgia lookin thing'll work, http://thumbs4.picclick.com/d/l400/p...-HUGE-6-lb.jpg

  8. #28
    How about a fire axe? I think some of those go 7#

  9. #29
    Maybe some of you have done this for an extended period of time, and I have not. Wouldn't swinging a 5-7lb felling axe all day be exhausting? I have a 5 lb Norlund, but can't imagine swinging that thing all day.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beachlogger View Post
    How about a fire axe? I think some of those go 7#
    To be "legal" under NFPA 1901, fireaxes whats part of the kit carried on fire apparatus is 6 pound min.
    May or not be the familiar pickhead, but at least one each is required. 8 Pounders are also common.

    There are smaller fireaxes. Shorter haft & lighter weight, known as a Truckmans axe. Carried on a firefighter belt.
    Its not part of an apparatus toolkit. Last I known, no NFPA 'specs for this type.

    Of course none of these are felling axes. While they could be sharpened & profiled to the task.
    Fireaxes are forced entry/demolition tools.
    Last edited by Lieblad; 12-12-2016 at 05:23 PM.

  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curt Hal View Post
    Maybe some of you have done this for an extended period of time, and I have not. Wouldn't swinging a 5-7lb felling axe all day be exhausting? I have a 5 lb Norlund, but can't imagine swinging that thing all day.
    Pretty sure most folks aren't swinging axes much over 3.5lb horizontally. Ones over the 4lb mark make more sense as bucking axes than as felling ones.


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  12. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by FortyTwoBlades View Post
    Pretty sure most folks aren't swinging axes much over 3.5lb horizontally. Ones over the 4lb mark make more sense as bucking axes than as felling ones.
    I have one of Council's 5-lb Daytons. It's beast, and I wouldn't want to swing it horizontal for very long. It's a fantastic splitter though! I wonder what the intended use was from Council?

  13. #33
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    A heavy square polled axe is sometimes used for demolition. Some fireman also prefer a square polled axe for opening roofs and doors. The axe doesn't get stuck when bashing with a square poll.

    http://www.firefighteraxe.com/flathead_axe.php

    http://counciltool.com/shop/fire-axe...rglass-handle/

  14. #34
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    used my 5lb plumb to demolish a large wooden dog house, and also a wooden green house type structure on the weekend

  15. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by nzedge View Post
    used my 5lb plumb to demolish a large wooden dog house, and also a wooden green house type structure on the weekend
    Dang. What type of crazy metal was playing in the background?

    I have 10 dog houses. I won't touch any of them, never know when I'll need one - missus kicking me out or somethin'. Especially the heated ones.

  16. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moonw View Post
    Dang. What type of crazy metal was playing in the background?

    I have 10 dog houses. I won't touch any of them, never know when I'll need one - missus kicking me out or somethin'. Especially the heated ones.
    Lol, a little dire straights would do the job for me

    When I first started the job, the girlfriend critisized the usefulness of my large axe...by the end of the job she was impressed to say the least =D
    The massive hardened poll was just the ticket =D

    here's the pooch taking a nap with the 5lb plumb after overseeing the job...everyone takes a nap with their axe every now and then...dont they?
    Last edited by nzedge; 12-13-2016 at 10:57 PM.

  17. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by nzedge View Post
    Lol, a little dire straights would do the job for me

    When I first started the job, the girlfriend critisized the usefulness of my large axe...by the end of the job she was impressed to say the least =D
    The massive hardened poll was just the ticket =D

    here's the pooch taking a nap with the 5lb plumb after overseeing the job...everyone takes a nap with their axe every now and then...dont they?
    Seems comfy!

  18. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by Jbmass View Post
    Racing axes are obviously bigger, but they are not meant for hard woods. Double your budget for those........
    And this is why Americans and Europeans get slaughtered at the Sydney Royal Easter Show... (fifteen inches o' Mountain Ash to chew through). They do make 'em for hardwoods.

    The standard (ie, most common) weight of Tassie Pattern axe is 4.5lbs. That's still the standard axe size here - 2.1kg. Hytest Foresters and Craftsmans were made from 3.5lb to 5lb in 1/2lb increments.

    Racings axes would come, out-of-the-box, at 6-8lbs...but it's expected the axeperson would take a fair bit of metal off them bevelling and grinding them to shape. A virgin racing axe looks quite boring.

  19. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by tandanus View Post
    And this is why Americans and Europeans get slaughtered at the Sydney Royal Easter Show... (fifteen inches o' Mountain Ash to chew through). They do make 'em for hardwoods.

    The standard (ie, most common) weight of Tassie Pattern axe is 4.5lbs. That's still the standard axe size here - 2.1kg. Hytest Foresters and Craftsmans were made from 3.5lb to 5lb in 1/2lb increments.

    Racings axes would come, out-of-the-box, at 6-8lbs...but it's expected the axeperson would take a fair bit of metal off them bevelling and grinding them to shape. A virgin racing axe looks quite boring.
    I'm pretty shore the hytest foresters only came out in 4.5 and 5lb.


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  20. #40
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