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Thread: Guardians of The Lambsfoot!

  1. #661
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    Harry! Nice one!
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  2. #662
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    Looks like a great one Harry! As all have mentioned no brass, no verdi, no guru < oops That's Van Morrison's song.

    Sorry; that looks really nice. I am thinking on a lambs foot as one of my next acquisitions. In your opinion is the firework worth the extra?
    If at first you don't succeed, skydiving is not for you. - Steven Wright

    ~ Alan

  3. #663
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    Quote Originally Posted by AShearer View Post
    Looks like a great one Harry! As all have mentioned no brass, no verdi, no guru < oops That's Van Morrison's song.

    Sorry; that looks really nice. I am thinking on a lambs foot as one of my next acquisitions. In your opinion is the firework worth the extra?
    Thank you very much Alan , Ron , and Chin : The back spring Filework was about 10 % extra and for me it was worth it at the time because I did not think that I might make it a User . I did not realize that it would have Steel Liners until yesterday when I was looking at them on line again . If I had known that when I ordered it , I may have not done the Filework . I am seriously considering making it a User now . I also have 2 of the TEW Barlows and I have worked back or filework , on one but not the other . I Do Not Mind at all to have a Knife that is unique or different from everybody else .

    Harry
    Last edited by Old Engineer; 03-20-2017 at 09:16 PM.

  4. #664
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    That is a beautiful haft! I can see what the factory meant stating that it was difficult to get horn of sufficient quality. The size of the rough ram's horn they would need to start with must be huge, to get those massive smooth sections. Certainly impressive! Well done on the workback choice as well. I think you have in this knife an ideal balance embodying the best of both aspects of knife collecting, a real working tool and a genuine work of art. A showpiece of an iconic British working knife. Nice!

  5. #665
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bartleby View Post
    That is a beautiful haft! I can see what the factory meant stating that it was difficult to get horn of sufficient quality. The size of the rough ram's horn they would need to start with must be huge, to get those massive smooth sections. Certainly impressive! Well done on the workback choice as well. I think you have in this knife an ideal balance embodying the best of both aspects of knife collecting, a real working tool and a genuine work of art. A showpiece of an iconic British working knife. Nice!
    The +1 what Bartleby said!

    Wishing I was smarter about these subjects? Nevertheless, it's beautiful Harry.
    If at first you don't succeed, skydiving is not for you. - Steven Wright

    ~ Alan

  6. #666
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bartleby View Post
    That is a beautiful haft! I can see what the factory meant stating that it was difficult to get horn of sufficient quality. The size of the rough ram's horn they would need to start with must be huge, to get those massive smooth sections. Certainly impressive! Well done on the workback choice as well. I think you have in this knife an ideal balance embodying the best of both aspects of knife collecting, a real working tool and a genuine work of art. A showpiece of an iconic British working knife. Nice!

    Thank you Sir !!! Much appreciated .

    Harry

  7. #667
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    It's interesting what Duncan was saying about growing to like different patterns over time. The Lambsfoot is not one of the patterns I used, or saw around when I was a kid. And the handle was a strange shape compared to what I was used to seeing.

    I grew to have an interest in the pattern through reading this, and Jack's earlier Lambsfoot thread.

    http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/sh...-The-Lambsfoot



    It was only recently though, that I actually acquired a couple of Lambsfoots - and was gifted one, and had a chance to use this outstanding 19th century farm and utility pattern, which has much to offer the 21st century user.

    One of the things which was brought home to me, was how you just can't pre-judge what a particular knife will feel like in-hand and in-use. This effect can be observed when you get a group of knives together at the same time, and for some intangible and unpredictable reason, one of them just feels right. I would contend that most old patterns are actually quite sophisticated evolutions of human ergonomics and task adaptation.



    The main virtue of the Lambsfoot to me is actually the fine ergonomic shape of the swayback handle first, and then the usefulness of the straight edge in good steel and fine tip control after.

    I like how this is a handle shape which still recalls the comfortable shape in hand of well-worn hafts of antler, or smooth, curved animal horn slabs in its not too distant past.

    The Golden Lambsfoot



    This knife has the added cool factor to me, that the haft covers actually are cattle horn. Another thing I like as a lefty, is how the golden, translucent side is the pile side, which adds to the enjoyment if CEing it, while using it.

    I have to start with a confession regarding this knife. I've only really been using it since this last weekend, due to it having an unusual issue which, in the end I just couldn't abide. The blade, which is centred in the channel at its tip, had actually been krinked along its length to achieve this! It was actually like someone had grabbed some pliers while the blade was annealed and first bent it one way, then a bit further down, bent it the other way. I've never seen a blade quite like that.

    I can overlook minor cosmetic issues, and flaws that can be easily fixed, but not that. So I thought, what a pity, considering the outstanding handle covers, and set it aside in favour of the ebony Lambsfoot for a user.

    This last weekend I was looking it over again, when I realised I could just grind down the blade flats and thin out the edge area a bit, and the worst of the rippling would be gone, and the edge apex would be reasonably reset, straight and centred.



    Doing this also had the benefit of providing a test in edge geometry improvement. I've noticed that a lot of the 'Golden Age' pocket knives I've been able to examine, have very thin flat grinds, almost zero grinds, compared to many modern traditionals that would tend to stick to about 0.025" behind the edge.

    This would naturally make them superb cutters, and easy to sharpen, especially for people who haven't handled or seen really sharp knives before. It's easy to see how Sheffield cutlery got its reputation with fine edge design like that - aiming for high performance cutting abilty first, and relying on the user to learn to work within the proper parameters of the tool, second.

    I asked Stan Shaw about this, during the visit to his Kelham Island workshop Jack and I made earlier this year, and he said forgers always left some thickness near the edge to prevent blade ripple during heat treatment and cooling, and also to ensure structural uniformity and consistent hardness when material is ground away later to form the blades flats and edge apex.

    The Japanese knife makers I have seen had a similar technique of forging quite thick blade blanks in the edge area, and then grinding away steel in its hardened state to form the blade profile and edge.

    They say it is more wearing and costly on materials and machinery, but it is the right way to do it and produces better edges. One maker I saw in Sakai, Kenichi Shiraki-san went to the additional step of having a large stock of forged blade blanks of different patterns in pigeon holes in a sort of holding area where they were stored for months before being final ground. He said it allowed the metal to 'rest' and 'season', like Finnish arms manufacturer Sako do with their rifle barrel blanks.



    Anyway, my A. Wright and Son, Golden Ox-horn Lambsfoot reground to a blade thinness more like the Unity Lambsfoot, is a little pocket laser! I don't have my micrometer at hand - it's packed away - but the thin, flat taper from edge to spine feels pretty similar now on the Golden Lambsfoot as the hundred year old, razor edged Unity forged blade. I've used it to peel apples and slice vegies the last couple of days and it's an excellent paring knife, turning nimbly in the cut, and just gliding through material. I'm looking forward to spending more time using it over the coming months.



    That is, if my thumb can stand it.

    Let's just say The Golden Lambsfoot and the torn stump of my thumbnail are taking a break from each other at the moment.



    Next: The Black Lambsfoot.
    Last edited by Cambertree; Yesterday at 08:33 PM.
    -Chin

  8. #668
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    Thanks for yet another excellent post Chin, really great reading I was looking at the Arthur Wright site the other day, and was reminded they actually do a 'Lefty' range, which includes a Lambsfoot. I wouldn't be surprised if they were willing to Leftify others

  9. #669
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Black View Post
    Thanks for yet another excellent post Chin, really great reading I was looking at the Arthur Wright site the other day, and was reminded they actually do a 'Lefty' range, which includes a Lambsfoot. I wouldn't be surprised if they were willing to Leftify others
    Cheers mate. I did notice that, but just assumed it might be reversed nail nicks. And like most left handers I've just learned to adapt - and go for pinchable blade patterns. But a true lefty traditional? With reversed blade configuration and shield (if any)? That would be worth looking into.

    I do always try to select the pile side of my stag knives on the basis that that is what I'm going to be looking at.
    -Chin

  10. #670
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cambertree View Post
    Cheers mate. I did notice that, but just assumed it might be reversed nail nicks. And like most left handers I've just learned to adapt - and go for pinchable blade patterns. But a true lefty traditional? With reversed blade configuration and shield (if any)? That would be worth looking into.

    I do always try to select the pile side of my stag knives on the basis that that is what I'm going to be looking at.
    I'm not actually sure, but if I get a chance to have a look, I'll check them out for you

  11. #671
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    Chin : : When I saw your Second Picture from the Top , it reminded me of what I noticed yesterday when I was trying get to understand my TEW Lambsfoot . And that is how the Curve of the handle just kind of curves up around the meaty heel of the thumbs when you are making a cut going away from your body . I the Lambsfoot and a GEC 74 out while I was burning so I just tried to compare the 2 on how they were while just sharpening dried twigs . I actually thought the winner was the Lambsfoot because of that small feature for comfort and it seems like the Straight Edge of the blade will stay in the cut longer than a Clip Blade . Not a lot of science involved in that , but that is what I felt . The perceived results surprised me because I had my mind made up that I would like the way the GEC 74 Stallion worked best . I will add that both knives were As Sharpened from the respective factories . I Do Not Expect that my simple test will make me like my 72's , 73's , and 74's any less , but it did make me like the Lambsfoot a little more .
    Let me give you some dimensional comparisons of the Taylors Eye Witness Lambsfoot to my 2 favorite carries . Northfield 77 Barlow Saw Cut Bone Clip Blade and Northfield 73 Stag Clip Blade . Measured with a Vernier Caliper .
    Closed Length : TEW = 3.59 NF 77 = 3.69 NF 73 = 3.38
    Over-All Length ; //// 6.31 //// 6.53 //// 6.90
    Handle Thickness //// .67 //// .39 //// .61
    Blade Spine Thickness : //// .086 //// .094 //// .094
    Blade Tang Thickness //// .099 //// .094 //// .094
    Opening Pull //// 3-5 //// 5-6 //// 7-8 Strictly a subjective guess
    Half / Stop //// NO //// YES //// YES
    Squared Off Pivot End : //// NO //// NO //// YES ( You can't use a 73 to open GEC Knife Tubes ) ( The Taylors Eye Witness is the same as a Northfield 73 )
    Liners //// Steel //// Steel //// Brass
    Pins //// Steel //// Steel //// Brass
    Blade //// Stainless //// 1095 //// 1095


    Harry
    Last edited by Old Engineer; Yesterday at 02:48 PM.

  12. #672
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Black View Post
    I'm not actually sure, but if I get a chance to have a look, I'll check them out for you
    Thanks mate, appreciate that. Don't put yourself out though. As I mentioned pinchable blades are a lefty's answer to a rightist traditional knife world!

    Quote Originally Posted by Old Engineer View Post
    Chin : : When I saw your Second Picture from the Top , it reminded me of what I noticed yesterday when I was trying get to understand my TEW Lambsfoot . And that is how the Curve of the handle just kind of curves up around the meaty heel of the thumbs when you are making a cut going away from your body . I the Lambsfoot and a GEC 74 out while I was burning so I just tried to compare the 2 on how they were while just sharpening dried twigs . I actually thought the winner was the Lambsfoot because of that small feature for comfort and it seems like the Straight Edge of the blade will stay in the cut longer than a Clip Blade . Not a lot of science involved in that , but that is what I felt . The perceived results surprised me because I had my mind made up that I would like the way the GEC 74 Stallion worked best . I will add that both knives were As Sharpened from the respective factories . I Do Not Expect that my simple test will make me like my 72's , 73's , and 74's any less , but it did make me like the Lambsfoot a little more .
    Let me give you some dimensional comparisons of the Taylors Eye Witness Lambsfoot to my 2 favorite carries . Northfield 77 Barlow Saw Cut Bone Clip Blade and Northfield 73 Stag Clip Blade . Measured with a Vernier Caliper .
    Closed Length : TEW = 3.59 NF 77 = 3.69 NF 73 = 3.38
    Over-All Length ; //// 6.31 //// 6.53 //// 6.90
    Handle Thickness //// .67 //// .39 //// .61
    Blade Spine Thickness : //// .086 //// .094 //// .094
    Blade Tang Thickness //// .099 //// .094 //// .094
    Opening Pull //// 3-5 //// 5-6 //// 7-8 Strictly a subjective guess
    Half / Stop //// NO //// YES //// YES
    Squared Off Pivot End : //// NO //// NO //// YES ( You can't use a 73 to open GEC Knife Tubes ) ( The Taylors Eye Witness is the same as a Northfield 73 )
    Liners //// Steel //// Steel //// Brass
    Pins //// Steel //// Steel //// Brass
    Blade //// Stainless //// 1095 //// 1095


    Harry
    Good observation there, Harry, and thanks for the data.

    I've been pondering over the design of the comfortable back curve of the swayback handle, myself.

    I intend to touch on it more in my post on the ebony Lambsfoot.
    -Chin

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