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Thread: Guardians of The Lambsfoot!

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmek5 View Post
    Is the blade on the TC Ancient Barlow considered a Lambs foot? Or were they trying to mimic a old over sharpened blade?
    Brother Redsparrow already raised that question Pmek. Please see my reply in post 27:

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Black View Post
    I guessed that question would come up at some point. When Charlie first told me about his idea for an Ancient Barlow, I spent a long time - months - and a lot of reading, trying to find a name for the blade. The best name I could find (I think) was a Short Beak, if I remember rightly. Charlie made a point of not running the edge parallel to the spine, like a true Lambsfoot, and so far as I know that blade shape pre-dates the Lambsfoot like the knives here. So MAYBE it was an early Lambsfoot. Personally, I think it probably had another name, and the Lambsfoot name was coined later, but it's definitely something to debate, and this would be a good place for that debate
    Quote Originally Posted by TsarBomba View Post
    Thanks, Dean! FYI I got my lambfoot fairly quickly from the UK (under a week)

    ...

    Jack, I whipped this up after finding a previously-posted lambfoot image that closely matched the one in your signature graphic. I hope this is clean enough for you.

    That's pretty fast TB - on both counts! Nice work

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Black View Post
    ... that is an absolute beauty May I ask the maker, unusual to see a bail?
    Thanks Jack. The tang stamp clearly says -RENOWN- and somewhat less clear "Sheffield".
    I feel very fortunate to have this one, Meako generously offered it in a forum GAW and I won. Some folks have a lucky rabbit's foot, I have a lucky lambsfoot.

  3. #43
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    Fabulous lambsfoot knives, everyone! Being a neophyte lambsfoot carrier, there are several examples here that I'd not seen before. Just lovely!

    There's something that I've been curious about and I wonder whether a fellow Guardian or other learned member of The Porch might be able to help educate me. What is the etymology of the name lambsfoot? I've seen it written as "lamb foot", "lambfoot", and "lambsfoot". Is the variation indicative of historic evolution, regional dialectical differences, personal taste of the author/speaker, or something else entirely?

    Also—and perhaps related—what is the story of the "real lamb foot"? Was there ever an imitation lamb foot? Was the term born of a trademark dispute or other spat between cutlers, perhaps?
    Greg

  4. #44
    This thread inspired me to carry mine again on my truncated walk through the park today. I decided to cut the walk a little short because it was just ludicrously hot unless you could find a shady spot. A giant tree that has to be hundreds of years old cast a pretty good shadow, so I stopped and took some pics. The blue bone on the Wright just lights up in the sunlight, though the pictures might not really do it justice:





    I am also realizing that the white IXL Barlow-foot (lam-Barlow?) might rapidly become one of my regular carries. Barlow, lambfoot, sharp as the dickens. I can't quite date the thing (and frankly I'm still not sure that the handles are even natural) but it just begs to be carried.

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by redsparrow View Post
    Thanks Jack. The tang stamp clearly says -RENOWN- and somewhat less clear "Sheffield".
    Thanks for the info. The 'RENOWN' mark was originally registered to William Hawcroft & Sons. However, it is most commonly seen on knives produced by Needham, Veall & Tyzack (Taylor's Eye Witness), who acquired the Hawcroft name and marks after Hawcroft & Sons became insolvent at the beginning of the 20th century.

  6. #46
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    Very interesting Jack. I appreciate your input. Thanks, -James-

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by WhittlinAway View Post
    Fabulous lambsfoot knives, everyone! Being a neophyte lambsfoot carrier, there are several examples here that I'd not seen before. Just lovely!

    There's something that I've been curious about and I wonder whether a fellow Guardian or other learned member of The Porch might be able to help educate me. What is the etymology of the name lambsfoot? I've seen it written as "lamb foot", "lambfoot", and "lambsfoot". Is the variation indicative of historic evolution, regional dialectical differences, personal taste of the author/speaker, or something else entirely?

    Also—and perhaps related—what is the story of the "real lamb foot"? Was there ever an imitation lamb foot? Was the term born of a trademark dispute or other spat between cutlers, perhaps?
    Very interesting questions my friend In Sheffield, I've only ever heard the knife called a 'Lambsfoot', despite the fact that I've only ever seen it written 'Lambfoot' or 'Lamb Foot' on knife blades. As for the 'Real Lamb Foot', this sounds very strange, but no more than 'Real Knife' or 'Real Barlow Knife'. I've heard it said that the name is taken from the blade's similarity to that of a lamb's foot, or that it has that name because Shepherd's used it to trim the hoofs of lambs. I take both tales with a large pinch of salt though. The Sheepsfoot is a much, much older blade form, and I suspect that calling a slimmer straight-edged blade a 'Lambsfoot' (or Lambfoot) made sense, or was a clever bit of early marketing. I wish I knew more about how the Lambsfoot developed historically, for such a popular English pattern, very little seems to have been written about it, but perhaps if someone has some answers (or some early trade catalogues), this thread will attract them. Certainly in Smith's Key of 1816 (http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/sh...tterns-of-1816), the blades which come closest are ones similar to Charlie's Ancient Barlows, but there is nothing quite like the Lambsfoot we know of today, so I think it must have either developed from that earlier style, or been a separate and later (later in the19th century) development



    An Abram Brooksbank Lambsfoot with the 'Real Knife' etch (Brooksbank were only one of the firms which used this):


  8. #48
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    Thanks for the interesting and informative thread, Jack!

    I'd like to apply for guardianship! I won this A. Wright and Son stag lambsfoot senator with some nice filework in a GAW by R.c.s.
    New:



    Now:


    I also have this biologically-improbable Land Shark with a Lambsfoot (Taylor-Schrade 19OT):


    - GT

  9. #49
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    You're in GT! Great A.Wright

    The 'Landshark' is a very interesting knife I think, I was very kindly gifted one by r8shell It certainly appears to be a Lambsfoot blade to me, and yet they don't sell it as such

  10. #50
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    Some great looking knives being shown! I have no foot to contribute, but I will keep looking

  11. #51
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    I'm seeing a subtle difference between the Lambfoot blade, which has a sloped drop to the point, and the "Ancient" and "Landshark" blades, which have a straight drop to the point. More like a long coping blade.

    Of course, I haven't seen as many Lambsfoots as you have, Jack, so feel free to correct me. Do Lambsfoots sometimes have that straight chopped look?
    }}}~33}º> The Most Honorable and Benevolent Order of Umberto <º{εεε~{{{
    ...............Order Of Osage .......... Go Raptors!................................
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  12. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by redsparrow View Post


    Thanks Jack. The tang stamp clearly says -RENOWN- and somewhat less clear "Sheffield".
    I feel very fortunate to have this one, Meako generously offered it in a forum GAW and I won. Some folks have a lucky rabbit's foot, I have a lucky lambsfoot.
    that was Ol'Snotty- lookin good now.

  13. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by meako View Post
    that was Ol'Snotty- lookin good now.
    It sure does! I didn't recognize Ol'Snotty!
    }}}~33}º> The Most Honorable and Benevolent Order of Umberto <º{εεε~{{{
    ...............Order Of Osage .......... Go Raptors!................................
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  14. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by redsparrow View Post
    Very interesting Jack. I appreciate your input. Thanks, -James-
    A pleasure James

    Quote Originally Posted by r8shell View Post
    I'm seeing a subtle difference between the Lambfoot blade, which has a sloped drop to the point, and the "Ancient" and "Landshark" blades, which have a straight drop to the point. More like a long coping blade.

    Of course, I haven't seen as many Lambsfoots as you have, Jack, so feel free to correct me. Do Lambsfoots sometimes have that straight chopped look?
    I had to go and find my Landshark r8shell Some Lambsfoot blades have a sloped drop, while others have a straighter drop, though not quite as dramatic as on the Landshark or Ancients. I've also often referred to the Ancient blade as like a long coping blade (or Cut-off Pen), but the coping blade has a parallel spine and edge, which I wasn't sure Charlie's Ancients would have. In terms of the Landshark, the angle of the point is more acute than on any Lambsfoot I have seen (as well as more angular), the Ancients even more so. Here's a comparison pic


  15. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Black View Post
    You're in GT! Great A.Wright

    The 'Landshark' is a very interesting knife I think, I was very kindly gifted one by r8shell It certainly appears to be a Lambsfoot blade to me, and yet they don't sell it as such
    Thanks, Jack; I feel honored, yet realize the solemn responsibility with which I've been entrusted!
    I wish I knew more about the history of that 19OT. Did Schrade USA manufacture that model, or is the Landshark an invention of Taylor Brands LLC?

    Quote Originally Posted by r8shell View Post
    I'm seeing a subtle difference between the Lambfoot blade, which has a sloped drop to the point, and the "Ancient" and "Landshark" blades, which have a straight drop to the point. More like a long coping blade.

    Of course, I haven't seen as many Lambsfoots as you have, Jack, so feel free to correct me. Do Lambsfoots sometimes have that straight chopped look?
    FWIW, r8shell, the Landshark's blade is typically referred to as a coping blade by sellers.

    Quote Originally Posted by meako View Post
    that was Ol'Snotty- lookin good now.
    I thought that was the knife that James posted! Good to get confirmation!

    - GT

  16. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by 5K Qs View Post
    I wish I knew more about the history of that 19OT. Did Schrade USA manufacture that model, or is the Landshark an invention of Taylor Brands LLC?

    - GT
    It is a "New Timer" invention, never made by Schrade USA. It is kind of cool anyway, and I've been meaning to pick one up for myself.
    }}}~33}º> The Most Honorable and Benevolent Order of Umberto <º{εεε~{{{
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  17. #57
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    Just to set the record straight; This lambfoot was once named "Sneezy" by r8shell (due to his sickly complexion). Sneezy was then dyed kelly green by Meako who appropriately renamed him "Kermit". Kermit was banished to America were he underwent Intensive Restorative Coloration Therapy (IRCT). After successful completion of IRCT he was given a new (secret) identity and is now (and has been for many years) the fine upstanding member of the Lambfoot Society of America you see here today.


  18. #58
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    - GT

  19. #59
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    and a good time was had by all
    at the trad forums lambsfoot ball.
    That's right -kermit.
    I must have been in denial.
    For those who came in late...
    Ol' Sneezebag was part of a mini bulk purchase of knives I made.
    A few have since gone to good homes.
    The original colour of Sneezers coat was in a word disgraceful.
    It was the colour of walrus snot if the walrus had been a 12 pack a day man for 90 years.
    and that's putting it mildly.
    So i dyed it Kelly green and it looked a lot fresher -like fresh 90 year old walrus snot.
    I couldn't bear to look at it any longer. but ..now.... I'm ...soproud.
    Hows the pull btw?
    Still a nailbreaker? and I'm talking a nailbreaker if the knife was being prised open by an enraged Jaguar.

  20. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Black View Post
    Very interesting questions my friend In Sheffield, I've only ever heard the knife called a 'Lambsfoot', despite the fact that I've only ever seen it written 'Lambfoot' or 'Lamb Foot' on knife blades.
    Fascinating!

    As for the 'Real Lamb Foot', this sounds very strange, but no more than 'Real Knife' or 'Real Barlow Knife'.
    I'd not heard of a "Real Knife" before. I guess I'll just chalk all these "Reals" up there, along with Real Ale, of course, as distinguished English contributions to society.

    I've heard it said that the name is taken from the blade's similarity to that of a lamb's foot, or that it has that name because Shepherd's used it to trim the hoofs of lambs. I take both tales with a large pinch of salt though. The Sheepsfoot is a much, much older blade form, and I suspect that calling a slimmer straight-edged blade a 'Lambsfoot' (or Lambfoot) made sense, or was a clever bit of early marketing.
    I bet you are right. And, that answers another question I had with respect to the sheepsfoot. Thank you. And thanks for all the other information, as well, my friend. Good stuff!
    Greg

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