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Thread: Introducing Tiger Claw Sharpening

  1. #41
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    Oh, and I see what you are doing here... Get her hooked on simple tools so when she unwraps that new table saw at Christmas she'll be smiling instead of rolling her eyes.
    But at what cost... she just co-opted my Osprey Knife and Tool Mamushi to cut leather. You all know what I am talking about. It's gone forever.

    She is the real energy behind this. I'm just a guy with a stone and a bad attitude.

  2. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by TripleT View Post
    But at what cost... she just co-opted my Osprey Knife and Tool Mamushi to cut leather. You all know what I am talking about. It's gone forever.

    She is the real energy behind this. I'm just a guy with a stone and a bad attitude.
    As long as it doesn't end up in the dishwasher....

  3. #43
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    The first run of strops are done. They are 100% handmade by Mrs. Tiger. Congratulations to those who got in on the first 5 free set!

    They are field grade class strops. Expect to see minor improvements and variations over time.



    We are offering these in black and green compound. Black is an average of 7 micron particle size (1000 Edge Pro stone/ 2800 grit). Green is an average of 0.5 micron particle size (60k grit). Black will cut slowly but is still relatively fine. Green should give a satin like polish and restore a shaving edge. Both are best used after honing on a rod, a stone, or the bottom of a coffee cup (my preference).

    The strop is 8" long and approximately 1.5" wide. They can be cut to order if you prefer a larger or smaller version.

    Please practice caution when stropping and be mindful of blade/hand clearance. The safest way is to place the strop on a stable surface and proceed accordingly. Minimizing movement of the strop will also optimize your results. Use very little pressure.

    These are starting off at $12 a piece plus shipping. No extra shipping on the strops if you pick one up while I am sharpening your blades.
    Last edited by Panthera tigris; 07-22-2016 at 06:17 PM.

  4. #44
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    I had the pleasure to knock out my first five orders this weekend. It was a challenging set, but I took each knife to the point where I would personally stop and carry it. There is always a balance between the way the knife was made and the optimal cutting edge. You have to work with the geometry. Some knives will naturally be thinner and razor sharp. Others, you bring just to the point where the edges meet without re-profiling. I always err on the conservative side. As Andy has noted, you can't put metal back on, but you can always use the knife and return to it to make it sharper. With any luck, I will see these blades again as they evolve with use. Please do not hesitate to contact me with constructive feedback as you take them with you on your journeys.

    In the future I will only update this thread with the Fiddleback Forge knives exclusively. Other selections will appear in my work log over on the custom sub forums: http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/sh...law-Sharpening

    First 5:

    Dogwood Dan Piranha



    Benchmade Dark Star



    David Boye Drop Point Ram



    Fiddleback Forge Patch Knife



    Fiddleback Forge EDC II

    Last edited by Panthera tigris; 07-24-2016 at 12:39 PM.

  5. #45
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    While preparing some shipments I had an opportunity to compare the Patch Knife and EDC II for those looking for a model to fit their needs.

    They are more similar in size than I had initially imagined.

    Both are approximately 1" at the widest point in the handle. The difference is that the swell in the EDC II is at the very bottom of the grip, whereas the swell in the Patch Knife is in the very center of the grip.

    The EDC II has two wide points between which the hand rests: the bottom of the grip and the ricasso/integral guard.

    On the Patch Knife, my pinky rests below the swell and my index finger rests between the swell and the ricasso/integral guard.



    This EDC II is 2.8" tip to heel of blade and 7" overall.

    The Patch Knife is exactly 3" of blade tip to heel with an overall length of 7.2".

    The .2" manifests in the blade as the handles are approximately equal in length.

    The EDC II is 1/8" stock at the widest point on the spine. This Patch Knife is 3/32" and tapered.

    The EDC II is 1.15" at its widest point in the blade, whereas the Patch Knife is .85" at the widest point on the blade. This strikes me as a thinner, pointier patch, and there will be differences in each handmade blade.

    From ricasso/guard to spine the EDC II is 1.2" and the Patch Knife is .9".




    The EDC II is curved at the edge and at the spine, creating a leaf shape profile that is symmetric.

    In contrast, the patch has a straight spine along the entire length of the blade, creating a deeper but shorter belly curve as the knife tapers to the tip. The patch's tip is also much finer, and seems more suitable for penetration.

    From a completely subjective perspective, the EDC II feels more secure in hand, but the Patch Knife feels more comfortable. Some of that feeling may be because of the difference of scale materials. In this case, Shadetree coffee burlap on the EDC II and stabilized maple on the Patch. Given the differences in blade stock and materials, this particular EDC is considerably heavier than the Patch Knife, which may also contribute to the way these blades feel in my hands.

    Both would make a great carry knife. The perceived security of the EDC II combined with its very strong tip shape would lend to drilling and notching for a bow drill during fire making. The patch would be more suitable for light batoning due to the straight spine, and also for food prep where the fine tip and deep but short belly could be used to dice herbs in a forward rocking motion.
    Last edited by Panthera tigris; 07-24-2016 at 09:41 PM.

  6. #46
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    That's a good review and helpful to me as a relatively new to FF person. I like them both but lean towards the EDC II a bit more.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    #blackwoksmatter

  7. #47
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    Keeping an edge sharp requires honing. After you use it a few times, run the edge along a ceramic rod or the bottom of coffee cup using only the weight of the blade. I show how to use both in the video below, featuring an Osprey Knife and Tool Mamushi in a Diomedes Industries sheath. It is redundant to do both. I do prefer the ceramic rod, but I can always find a coffee cup in a cabin or while traveling!

    First, inspect the edge. Try to cut a piece of paper along the entire length of the edge to see where it starts tearing and where the edge may need the most work. Put the edge on the hone and tilt the spine of the knife off the hone at approximately 1 to 2 times the width of the spine, or about the width of 3 or 4 dimes. You can also mark the edge with a sharpie to see if you are contacting the edge and adjust accordingly. The marker can be removed after your session using isopropyl alcohol.

    When you come to the tip, do not let it trail off the hone. Simply stop and remove the knive while the tip is still contacting the hone. You may need to tilt the knife wider on select areas such as the heel and the tip depending if you are making contact or not.

    Follow this up by stropping with light pressure with a trailing movement. When stropping, I raise the knife and start with the tip, then progressively lower it to meet the rest of the edge. The space of the spine off the strop should not be more than 1 or 2 times the width of the knife spine, or as high as will contact the edge as can be seen by removal of marker. Alternately, raise the spine until you can feel the edge start cutting into leather with a soft push. Then, lower it back just a little. This accommodates the natural geometry of most knives that taper toward the tip.

    Honing is a push movement and stropping is a pull.

    Eventually, the knife will need proper sharpening. This video shows how to maintain the knife between sharpening sessions, how to align it if you sense the edge is rolling, and how to prevent microchips by ensuring you are using an edge that is aligned. You should see immediate results. Once this stops working, send it back to me



    Our field grade strops are featured in this video and can be made to order at $12 a piece plus shipping, or added on to any sharpening order.

    More tips here: http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/sh...ovement-thread!
    Last edited by Panthera tigris; 07-25-2016 at 03:18 PM.

  8. #48
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    When Jarrett posted his Tiger Claw Sharpening thread I did not hesitate to contact him regarding a knife that I picked up at Blade Show from a former apprentice of Andy's, Dan Eastwood. Based on reviews that I had read about the unique handle geometry of the Dogwood Piranha, I was excited to find one w/ Black Palm handles on Dan's table. My excitement was somewhat quelled when I got home and first put the knife to use. I immediately noticed that the knife would hitch about 2/3 the way through a slicing cut.

    After receiving the knife Jarrett immediately got back to me with an assessment and we then agreed on a work plan. Here is the follow up message that I received from Jarrett when he was finished:

    "I worked on the edge until both sides met up and I was able to form a new edge at that area. Per your request, the knife is now just under 40 degrees inclusive (more around 39) to align with your Sharpmaker. Behind the cutting edge is a 15 degree back bevel. If at any point the knife rolls a little or experiences microchipping, you will be able to fix it up on the Sharpmaker 40 degree setting because there is fresh steel waiting for it just behind the cutting edge."

    I received the knife back today, along with one of the promotional strops that he offered to the first five customers. I am please to say that Jarrett did an amazing job of bringing out the soul of this knife. This Piranha will now bite !





    I would like to thank Jarrett for his fine work, along with the complimentary strop offer, and encourage anyone who is in need of his services to shoot him a PM and get the ball rolling. Based on my own personal experience, I suspect you too will become one of his satisfied customers.

    Peter
    Last edited by prom52; 07-26-2016 at 08:24 AM.
    "The organization of materials into shapes useful to man is what separates civilization from chaos". R. Campbell

  9. #49
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    Great pictures, Peter. Thank you for the review and let me know how the edge performs throughout your travels.
    Last edited by Panthera tigris; 07-25-2016 at 07:03 PM.

  10. #50
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    Introducing Tiger Claw Sharpening

    I hope Jarrett will forgive the fact that I have no pictures to go with my review. I sent him my most coveted knife, A David Boye recycled sawmill blade knife made for me in 1978. It had been setting "in the safe" as they say, for a good many years waiting for my son to lay claim to it. I sent off the Jarrett with no hesitation, and I'm glad I did. Since receiving the Boye last Tuesday I've put it through the kitchen paces quite a bit. True it's no kitchen knife but I'll tell you I was quite amazed when I began to fine slice carrots, ginger and elephant garlic. Of course of these three the fiberous ginger gave the best unexpected results. Not paper thin slices but thin enough that light would pass through...and the feel of the blade slicing through was incomparable to the time when I last used this knife. I've since decided to forego passing this one along to my son just yet. It's in my edc line up. Great Job Jarrett...I'll be sending many more your way.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Last edited by varga49; 07-29-2016 at 10:52 AM.
    #blackwoksmatter

  11. #51
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    Thank you for the feedback. I was proud to work on your knife, even if at the expense of your son's knife inheritance!

  12. #52
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    I had the chance to work with a client's W.A. Surls Lil Ness with black bolstered Shadetree Composite philellow burlap micarta.

    Very cool interpretation of a traditional pattern.

    Last edited by Panthera tigris; 07-30-2016 at 08:31 PM.

  13. #53
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    Fiddleback Forge 3 Finger Joe with blue back finish and sandblasted canvas micarta



    I'm really enjoying the patterning of the blue back finish. It is hard to capture in the picture, but it has a tiger stripe quality.

  14. #54
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    This Kephart came out beautifully. It was sharpened on a 10000 grit stone followed by stropping with 0.5 micron compound on one of our own green strops.



    01 can really take a keen edge.

    Of course, that is all overshadowed by the buckeye burl and aluminite resin "lava" scales.
    Last edited by Panthera tigris; 07-30-2016 at 08:31 PM.

  15. #55
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    I wanted to say thank you to everyone who has given me the chance to take your blades to the next level. The response from the Fiddleback Forge community has been overwhelmingly positive and I am very grateful.

    I have recently changed my username to Panthera tigris (formerly TripleT) to support the brand. In conjunction with this change, I have designed a new logo.

    Additionally, I am happy to announce that 10% of all sharpening proceeds will be used to support big wild cat preservation at Panthera. This is a retroactive change from the start of the business.

    We will also continue to support Super Ben and his family privately, and we encourage you to do the same.

    More super sharp Fiddleback pics to come...
    Last edited by Panthera tigris; 07-31-2016 at 06:28 PM.
    Visit our new site at Tiger Claw Sharpening. We donate 10% of all proceeds to wild cat conservation.

  16. #56
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    Shank!

    Visit our new site at Tiger Claw Sharpening. We donate 10% of all proceeds to wild cat conservation.

  17. #57
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    Looks like the books are open, folks. Let me know if I can be of service in the coming weeks. Photos of recent projects I have completed are available at the link in my signature.
    Last edited by Panthera tigris; 08-07-2016 at 10:10 AM.
    Visit our new site at Tiger Claw Sharpening. We donate 10% of all proceeds to wild cat conservation.

  18. #58
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    You are doing some great work! It is obvious that you know what you are dong have some strong skills! I wish you all the best with your new business and look forward to seeing more pics.

  19. #59
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    Introducing Tiger Claw Sharpening

    Just received the shank.... so this is number two for me now Jarrett. And this one is a pleasure to hold. I'll be trying her out tonight Your approach to working with a customer in the way you've described is unprecedented really... I'll be sending more next week thanks again Jarrett.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Last edited by varga49; 08-08-2016 at 05:02 PM.
    #blackwoksmatter

  20. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by ncrockclimb View Post
    You are doing some great work! It is obvious that you know what you are dong have some strong skills! I wish you all the best with your new business and look forward to seeing more pics.
    Taking pics is half the fun of having knives! Thanks for the vote of confidence and I will strive to keep learning and developing the skill.

    Quote Originally Posted by varga49 View Post
    Just received the shank.... so this is number two for me now Jarrett. And this one is a pleasure to hold...
    I appreciate the feedback. I shudder to think of the carnage of your kitchen after you are done using that knife tonight

    If you can, snap a few shots for the "Fiddlebacks and food" thread.
    Visit our new site at Tiger Claw Sharpening. We donate 10% of all proceeds to wild cat conservation.

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