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Thread: Spanish flea market finds.

  1. #81
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    The welding of a few dissimilar pieces on the larger axe is a fairly standard method of obtaining the necessary mass/weight of head.

    As is the specific technique-"skew-weld"-very common in tool making.

    Equally possible as a repair or new construction....

  2. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by jake pogg View Post
    The welding of a few dissimilar pieces on the larger axe is a fairly standard method of obtaining the necessary mass/weight of head.

    As is the specific technique-"skew-weld"-very common in tool making.

    Equally possible as a repair or new construction....
    My first thoughts were of it being constructed of whatever materials were to hand, I guess it doesn't really matter what supports the hardened bit as long as it doesn't fail.

  3. #83
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    That's it exactly.Many old axes,pre-/early Industrial Age,show evidence of having been welded out of scrap picked up off the forge floor,literally.......

  4. #84
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    A schematic drawing of axes by Pleiner, with this caption:

    Fig. 22. Production seams on axes according to the upper surface.

    1 - Belgium, 6 to 7 Century,

    2 - Morley-Meuse 4th Century (center lap steel),

    3 - Lezéville, hr. 200, beginning 6th century,

    4 - Novgorod, 11 century. (Welded edge),

    5 - Kent, 6 to 8 century. (Welded edge).

    White: iron; spotted: steel. 1-3 after Salin, 4 after Kolcin, 5 after Antein.


    (Thanks,Jeff P.,for this info)

  5. #85
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    Thank you very much Jake that's an interesting illustration, obviously this one looks very much like number 4.

    I have seen a few looking like number 2 but always though they were round raps that had been beaten on! Which in reality is probably what they were.....

    The thing that surprises me about the illustration is the dates, I imagine wrapped axes/ hatchets must have been made right up to (relatively) recently, the industrial revolution putting an end to them being made in any quantities in the western world?

    I'm not sure I understand why number 1 seems to have it's harder steel at the bottom of the eye, is it me not seeing something obvious?

  6. #86
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    I'mSoSharp,many of the things about earlier axes we can only wonder at...The schematics above are only provisionate,of course...

    The (presumed)lack of higher-C in the cutting edge can be any number of things...wear?Some different mechanism of hardening?(like the low C but very rich P alloys that work well work-hardened,as in peened).There's any number of possibilities.

    Different peoples have had their 'Iron Age' all at different times,and some took longer getting around to thermal heat-treating of carbon-alloys,but the act of forge-welding came early and naturally,being kinda an implicit part in the bloomery process,in refining the bloom.So people used it a lot,especially as it's reasonably economical.
    And yes,well into the 20-th c. the edges on cutting tools were welded in.
    But even today we use many tools overlayed(often by forge-,that is to say the diffusion-welding),with carbides,or whatever hardened alloy inserts about their cutting edges.
    The use of that principle is probably actually increasing....

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