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Thread: Spanish flea market finds.

  1. #1
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    Spanish flea market finds.


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    Another interesting shaped head I thought you might like to see, nice deep stamp "Juan Lopez, Guadalcazar" which isn't too far away from me in southern Spain.

    2lb 9oz (1.16kg)


    J + Z missing I assume.


    Not sure about the handle this would have had.


    Pictured with another smaller hatchet head of similar style 1lb1oz (0.5kg).


    Thought I might put all my finds here in one thread to keep things neat.

    Previous find threads-
    http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/sh...-hatchet-heads
    http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/sh...Updated-post-7
    http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/sh...rge-French-axe
    Last edited by I'mSoSharp; 10-07-2016 at 03:07 PM.

  2. #2
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    these heads look really nice to me, but here in the states i've never handle one inperson.

  3. #3
    Interesting pattern. Paint and all, but I really dig the lines on the small one!

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    Quote Originally Posted by markv View Post
    these heads look really nice to me, but here in the states i've never handle one inperson.
    I'm a Brit so growing up in England I became familiar with the same kind of axes as you & those are about here too, never saw this type so these are the one's I usually pick up simply because they are different to what I'm used to. Most of these have tapered eyes with slip through (?) handles something I never saw in the UK.

    Quote Originally Posted by Moonw View Post
    Interesting pattern. Paint and all, but I really dig the lines on the small one!
    I agree the small one's cool, both are the first I've found in these exact shapes.

  5. #5
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    Made a handle for the larger one.

    This-


    To this- (400g "Lista" hatchet for thinning down)


    To this- (After using a draw knife & sand paper)


    It's pretty skinny as it's a slip through handle but feels good, left it long enough to adjust if necessary. This is a guess as to what the handle should be like, I think the kink in the haft/angle of the eye in the head keeps it tight with every blow.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by I'mSoSharp View Post
    Made a handle for the larger one.

    This-


    To this- (400g "Lista" hatchet for thinning down)


    To this- (After using a draw knife & sand paper)


    It's pretty skinny as it's a slip through handle but feels good, left it long enough to adjust if necessary. This is a guess as to what the handle should be like, I think the kink in the haft/angle of the eye in the head keeps it tight with every blow.
    Nice work!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Able_walker View Post
    Nice work!
    Thank you, glad you like it.

  8. #8
    I see you're keeping with the Spanish style of the slip through axe handle/head. Very nice!

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    Quote Originally Posted by I'mSoSharp View Post
    Made a handle for the larger one
    To this- (After using a draw knife & sand paper)



    It's pretty skinny as it's a slip through handle but feels good, left it long enough to adjust if necessary. This is a guess as to what the handle should be like, I think the kink in the haft/angle of the eye in the head keeps it tight with every blow.
    Your end product is 'Shaker-style' exquisite! Your intuition about ergonomics, balance and blade contact when swinging, and using to full advantage the natural curves of a specifically selected piece of wood has yielded something I am envious of. Beautifully done!
    Shakers, by the way were a quaint USA religious group from 150-200 years ago. Shaker-made furniture, to this day, is revered for it's 'pleasing to the eye' simplicity.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 300Six View Post
    Your end product is 'Shaker-style' exquisite! Your intuition about ergonomics, balance and blade contact when swinging, and using to full advantage the natural curves of a specifically selected piece of wood has yielded something I am envious of. Beautifully done!
    Shakers, by the way were a quaint USA religious group from 150-200 years ago. Shaker-made furniture, to this day, is revered for it's 'pleasing to the eye' simplicity.

    300six said it pretty well, that axe you set up really is a pleasing looking tool.

  11. #11
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    Perfect lines on that handle. Looks like the main length is pointing straight towards the center of gravity, or very close to it, and the angle of the hang is spot on. Not to say that that's what it is, but the head resembles Russian axes that I've seen labeled as butcher's axes.


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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jlemay18 View Post
    I see you're keeping with the Spanish style of the slip through axe handle/head. Very nice!
    On this one yes, sometimes like the large French head I'll make a "normal" handle for a slip through head, just a bit trickier to do. And thanks.

    Quote Originally Posted by 300Six View Post
    Your end product is 'Shaker-style' exquisite! Your intuition about ergonomics, balance and blade contact when swinging, and using to full advantage the natural curves of a specifically selected piece of wood has yielded something I am envious of. Beautifully done!
    Shakers, by the way were a quaint USA religious group from 150-200 years ago. Shaker-made furniture, to this day, is revered for it's 'pleasing to the eye' simplicity.
    Wow, what nice praise I'm flattered! Thank you.
    The Shakers were a quaint English religious group first as was the Quakers. All started near where I was born & brought up in the north of England. I see exactly what you mean with the functional simplicity idea, that theme does appeal when making something.

    Quote Originally Posted by Agent_H View Post
    300six said it pretty well, that axe you set up really is a pleasing looking tool.
    Thank you.

    Quote Originally Posted by FortyTwoBlades View Post
    Perfect lines on that handle. Looks like the main length is pointing straight towards the center of gravity, or very close to it, and the angle of the hang is spot on. Not to say that that's what it is, but the head resembles Russian axes that I've seen labeled as butcher's axes.
    Thanks, it does have a bit of weight below the handle when held horizontal, but I get where you're coming from.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by FortyTwoBlades View Post
    Perfect lines on that handle. Looks like the main length is pointing straight towards the center of gravity, or very close to it, and the angle of the hang is spot on. Not to say that that's what it is, but the head resembles Russian axes that I've seen labeled as butcher's axes.
    He's got a good point there. Unless steam bending of handles is/was commonplace for these types of heads it's difficult to imagine factory workers creating similarly-upturned handles. Having a blade angled toward you ought to make butchering of livestock easier during pull strokes. But I have to admit to having no experience in this.

    If this manufacturer is still in existence you might want to contact them for an opinion.
    Last edited by 300Six; 10-22-2016 at 09:07 AM.

  14. #14
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    Here's an example of a Russian butcher's axe.



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    Quote Originally Posted by FortyTwoBlades View Post
    Here's an example of a Russian butcher's axe.
    They share pretty wide bits, but the Russian axes have normal eyes with wedged handles. Funnily I turned up this image using "Russian butcher's axe" as a search-



    Note how this has the small protrusion under the handle as well, can anyone tell me what it's for?
    I know it's no good for overstrike on either axe as the edge comes back further than it.
    Also the there is a gap between it & the handle, it'clearly not meant to fit against the bottom of the handle.
    Only thing I can think of is something to hang it on a nail or peg by, anyone know?

  16. #16
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    Oh I wasn't suggesting that that was what it actually was. It may or may not be a butcher's axe, but it's definitely not a Russian one. I was just posting the image as an example of what I was referencing. As far as the spur on the underside, I have no idea what it's for. I've seen them on Russian and Eastern European axes and on Spanish and Portuguese axes, but never managed to find out if there was a functional reason for the feature.


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  17. #17
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    Yeah FortyTwoBlades I can see why you'd think of that pattern.

    As silly as it seems, the axe does hang on a nail better than it would without that protrusion, it could be as simple as that!


  18. #18
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    Would keep ya' from getting a ding in the wood there over time, too.


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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by I'mSoSharp View Post

    That looks like a Russian carpenter’s/general purpose ТОПОР axe to me:

    Member IPT posted this video of a similar style being made:
    Quote Originally Posted by ipt View Post
    Ну!
    Вот так делается!
    ;*)
    Молодец!

    http://forum.novarata.net/viewtopic.php?p=19125

    More an upswept edge comes to mind for a dedicated butcher’s axe

    Something along the lines of this Finnish maker for example (Billnäs):


    A couple of examples of what I think of you posted there:




    What is the spur for? My guess is that the spur was longer down the front of the handle and there was also a second an elongation down the handle at the poll as well in the past.
    Here a guy Turbo who describes it as “protection for the bottom of the axe”
    http://rusknife.com/topic/9186-%D1%8...%D0%B5/page-27

    Jake Pogg might have some input. Here is something that this thread reminded me of:
    Quote Originally Posted by jake pogg View Post
    Fantastic,you're on!

    And over a few of those,the axe-freak conversation must surely begin to flow....

    And here's a brief historical note on the background of these axes....

    No one really knows where exactly they have originated.Their evolution took place slowly,imperceptibly changing the details,till the whole began to appear quite different,even unique.
    Now,Scandinavia is right across the street from NW Russia,and some W-NW regions are plain occupied territories,previously occupied by a set of Germanic people(Estonia,and other Baltic regions),AND,during the Viking age(nominally 7th to 11th c.c.)it is known that the so-called Ost-Vikings have sailed into the White sea,and from there descended the (eventually)Volga R. drainage to the Caspian,and have been doing it Regularly,for some centuries.
    Despite all of the above,it is NOT ok to ascribe any of the features of "traditional"(?)Russian tools to the Norse people.Despite the fact that VERY many artifacts are virtually indistinguishable from those found in Birka,or Hedeby,or many of other,important Viking age sites.
    During the 40-ies and 50-ies,Joe Stalin has publicly denounced a number of scientists that were inclined to think that.They were termed the "vicious Normanists",and were publicly derided and subsequently executed.
    (Today,Putin's border-line fascist regime is heading there again,it is entirely unpatriotic,and soon will be punishable,to attribute any of the achievements of the Great Russian People to the lowly,corrupt Europeans).
    However,and most thankfully,this horse-hooey does not apply to me...So i can,and will,note the peculiar similarities between these axes and the Finnish axe-making traditions.

    The very deep,tubular eye peculiar to the Germanic "goose-wing" hewing axes,and the common Finnish ones has an inverted conical shape,the small end towards the top of the axe.(That is for the ruralites to use less than perfect stick to haft their tools,and to be able to space it out on occasion outside in the weather,for when it swells,it just backs itself out,and needs hardly anything to be made tight and functional again).

    Similarly,the earlier Russian axes were hafted the same way.An inverted cone.
    The archaeology in that unhappy part of the world has always struggled heroically,against great economic and political challenges,and so the axes are not studied to any great extent.But these earlier axes do have an approx.designation,being commonly termed "15th to 17th century type".

    On a certain type of a Finnish axe,the so-called "Karelian type(can be found in the Billnas,and other old catalogues),the bottom part,the "sleeve" of that long eye is abbreviated,leaving a part hanging in the front(and sometimes one in the back)of the haft.
    I b'lieve that the "spur" of the typical Russian axe is the vestige of same.


    The large volume of the eye is related,as discussed above,to the softness of birch,as the predominant haft material.

    The rest has developed according to the local needs and usage,plus the necessity to combine tools from sheer poverty,so,the combination chopping/hewing tool....
    I bet those types of axes have been used to butcher animals/cut meat and probably still are.

    You can also hang it on a nail
    Last edited by Agent_H; 10-23-2016 at 09:47 AM.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Agent_H View Post
    That looks like a Russian carpenter’s/general purpose ТОПОР axe to me:
    http://forum.novarata.net/viewtopic.php?p=19125
    Neat video !
    Obviously they are not interested in making money there manufacturing axes !

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