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Thread: Your opinion on Emerson knives?

  1. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by shinyedges View Post
    Fair enough, carry what you like. I hate when things drift off into borderline rudeness. For that apologies to all.

    Glad it works for you man, I mean that. I like to share opinions and debate without the animosity. We all won't like the same stuff, attack each others points not each other.
    Well said--and I got what you were saying before, which is why I issued no challenge. A lot of this comes down to preference, and we are all clearly enthusiastic about the hobby/ gear.

    I'll be interested in the OP's take on the Horseman. I hope he keeps it long enough to use it; however, he'll likely know if he likes it in the first few minutes. If he keeps it, he should sand the g10 under the clip--it will save his pants.

  2. #122
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    The grind is like that because it's how they've always done it. At the start he wanted it to be different from the other commonly chisel ground knives which were kitchen knives.

    You know what they say; If it looks stupid and it works it's not stupid.

  3. #123
    Chisel ground blades are, in theory, sharper. There is only one single edge angle. If a saber ground blade has the same edge angle as a chisel, it still has two edges and thus twice the included angle. Many Japanese kitchen knives are chisel ground for this reason.

  4. #124
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    I thought some kitchen knives were chisel ground so whatever you were cutting would be less prone to sticking to the blade?
    Go the TGM!

  5. #125
    Agreed, I hope he likes it as well. And +1 on the saving pockets from g10. Thanks for being pleasant to converse with despite the fact we have different preferences.

    Quote Originally Posted by Aias View Post
    Well said--and I got what you were saying before, which is why I issued no challenge. A lot of this comes down to preference, and we are all clearly enthusiastic about the hobby/ gear.

    I'll be interested in the OP's take on the Horseman. I hope he keeps it long enough to use it; however, he'll likely know if he likes it in the first few minutes. If he keeps it, he should sand the g10 under the clip--it will save his pants.

  6. #126
    Quote Originally Posted by trevitrace View Post
    I thought some kitchen knives were chisel ground so whatever you were cutting would be less prone to sticking to the blade?
    It's possible that's an added reason but I'm not sure that makes sense. Not all chisel grinds look the same. If you sharpen one side, it's a chisel edge even if it's still flat. It doesn't necessarily require the same aggressive grind that Emerson does on the knife.

  7. #127
    Thickness behind edge is relative to sharpness. A chisel edge can be thicker behind the edge than a v edge. One isn't necessarily sharper than the other. And both can be made to be sharper than the other.
    Quote Originally Posted by AusLoX View Post
    Chisel ground blades are, in theory, sharper. There is only one single edge angle. If a saber ground blade has the same edge angle as a chisel, it still has two edges and thus twice the included angle. Many Japanese kitchen knives are chisel ground for this reason.

  8. #128
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    Quote Originally Posted by shinyedges View Post
    Agreed, I hope he likes it as well. And +1 on the saving pockets from g10. Thanks for being pleasant to converse with despite the fact we have different preferences.
    You bet man. I've always liked your posts.

  9. #129
    The feeling is mutual!
    Quote Originally Posted by Aias View Post
    You bet man. I've always liked your posts.

  10. #130
    Quote Originally Posted by shinyedges View Post
    Thickness behind edge is relative to sharpness. A chisel edge can be thicker behind the edge than a v edge. One isn't necessarily sharper than the other. And both can be made to be sharper than the other.
    Of course and blade stock makes a difference as well. But all things equal. A chisel, in theory, can have a more acute angle which translates to sharpness.

  11. #131
    This has been hashed out many times, I don't remember all of it LOL but I will say I don't think that is the case. If I am not mistaken. But I won't lie, I am not going to dig up the last time this went down to win this. I remember fortytwoblades had a very solid post on the subject but the rest eludes me.
    Quote Originally Posted by AusLoX View Post
    Of course and blade stock makes a difference as well. But all things equal. A chisel, in theory, can have a more acute angle which translates to sharpness.

  12. #132
    Quote Originally Posted by shinyedges View Post
    This has been hashed out many times, I don't remember all of it LOL but I will say I don't think that is the case. If I am not mistaken. But I won't lie, I am not going to dig up the last time this went down to win this. I remember fortytwoblades had a very solid post on the subject but the rest eludes me.
    No need to hash it out. I read that thread as well. That's why I said in theory. I'm not saying to only use chisel ground blades, it was just added conversation to the "why a chisel" question on Emerson's blades. I think that's part of the logic, as well as, ease of sharpening.

  13. #133
    I lived in Japan for a while during my formative years. As a knife nut, I paid attention to their kitchen knives.

    The explanation I heard time and again was that when slicing soft food items (like fish), the chisel allowed more precise cuts, mostly due to better indexing. Easier to keep the edges square...same reason a wood chisel is ground that way.

    Of course, that assumes the ground part is on the correct side. For a right-handed user, that means the opposite of how Emerson does it!

  14. #134
    And that I can not disagree with, I would call that a definite plus.
    Quote Originally Posted by AusLoX View Post
    No need to hash it out. I read that thread as well. That's why I said in theory. I'm not saying to only use chisel ground blades, it was just added conversation to the "why a chisel" question on Emerson's blades. I think that's part of the logic, as well as, ease of sharpening.

  15. #135
    Quote Originally Posted by trevitrace View Post
    I thought some kitchen knives were chisel ground so whatever you were cutting would be less prone to sticking to the blade?
    The sushi knives are flat chisel ground to the spine. I think that's a big difference to a tanto style chisel ground folder.

    I must admit I am NOT a tanto folder fan, I mean, I like tantos, but I prefer a sabre v or hollow ground in these tiny things, although my new FFG PM2 is working out much better than expected.

  16. #136
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    The misconception comes from the fact that a chisel ground edge only has one side ground. Thus often has less total angle than a V grind. For instance a V grind might be ground 15 degrees per side. A chisel edge knife would be ground 15 degrees on one side and the unground side is effectively 0 degrees. Thus the V ground edge is 30 degrees total while the chisel edge is 15.

    Now it is possible to grind a V edge down to 15 degrees total as well, or even 10 degrees, five per side. So a V edge can be made just as acute as a chisel edge.

  17. #137
    Quote Originally Posted by Lapedog View Post
    The misconception comes from the fact that a chisel ground edge only has one side ground. Thus often has less total angle than a V grind. For instance a V grind might be ground 15 degrees per side. A chisel edge knife would be ground 15 degrees on one side and the unground side is effectively 0 degrees. Thus the V ground edge is 30 degrees total while the chisel edge is 15.

    Now it is possible to grind a V edge down to 15 degrees total as well, or even 10 degrees, five per side. So a V edge can be made just as acute as a chisel edge.
    You're right, but all things being equal. So if you ground the V to a 5 on each side then you need to grind the chisel to 5 and therefore the V will never catch up to a chisel no matter how low you go(technically high). It's just math but I think everyone gets the idea.
    Like I said before I think that's the logic behind the chisel choice by Emerson along with the ease of sharpening. I'm not saying chisel is the best grind out there.

  18. #138
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    If you were to grind a chisel edge to the same degree per side as a comparable V edge then yes the chisel edge will always be half of the V grind as one side of the chisel grind is 0 degrees.

    Either edge can be more acute if you just grind it that way. It is just that from the factory many knives come roughly 20 or 15 degrees per side. So most knives with a V grind are coming between 30 and 40 degrees total. Since Emerson is only grinding one side and the other is 0 degrees I guess that means theoretically most Emersons are coming between 15 and 20 degrees total. ( Don't quote me on this I've never actually measured the total edge angle that Emersons come ground at.

    I think once you get used to chisel grinds they are no problem. I honestly find them WAY faster to sharpen than a V grind as I free hand sharpen. I can sharpen my CQC7 Tanto way faster than I can my V ground knives. On all my knives I try to keep them sharp and not let them get to the point of being dull so all sharpening sessions are essentially touch ups. For a V ground edge I have to run one side on the stone, flip the knife and run the other side, flip the knife run the first side, flip the knife etc. etc.....

    For the chisel ground Emerson I just go back and forward on the stone 15 times on the one edge, knock the burr off the back, run the front edge (the secondary edge at the front of the tanto) 15 times on the stone, knock the burr off the back of that, repeat, change to higher grit, repeat.

    For a V ground edge I am just constantly flipping the knife over with each stroke. (I know I am supposed to grind one side to form a burr but I just find it more precise and easier to flip the knife each stroke even if it takes longer.)

  19. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by trevitrace View Post
    I didn't expect a place to allow a return after that long of time period "just because". So the next person buying that new Emerson gets one that's been carried/used for a month?
    It still has to be in new condition to return it. They just allow you to have that many days. But it is up to Blade HQ. It won't take me 30 days to know if I like it or not.

  20. #140
    Quote Originally Posted by Berickson47 View Post
    It still has to be in new condition to return it. They just allow you to have that many days. But it is up to Blade HQ. It won't take me 30 days to know if I like it or not.
    Hope you enjoy it enough to keep. I really like mine.

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