Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 21

Thread: Using a drill press.

  1. #1

    Using a drill press.


    Support BladeForums!
    Paid memberships don't see ads!
    I have read some of you using a drill press to make your holes and I wonder if you could enlarge on how the press is used. Do you drill the holes, poke them, or just what do you do to make so the thread goes thru.
    Thanks and best wishes.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Ontario Canada
    Posts
    744
    When I did it I drilled the holes. But you need to be super careful the the holes are going in plumb. But you could probably also use it as an arbour press and an awl.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Either Eatonville or Longview, WA
    Posts
    265
    What I was taught was to put a needle in the drill press and poke the holes with the drill running at a slow speed. So I guess I do a combination of punch and drill.

  4. #4
    I never used a drill press but I did use a dremel with a 1/16" drill bit.

    Dusty Johnson did an article years back in Leather Crafter's and Saddler's Journal about using a drill instead of an awl. He did a test, albeit unscientific, about the strength of the holes themselves made with a drill versus an awl.

    The drilled holes were stronger from what I recall.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Henry Hasse from West Michigan
    Posts
    197
    I put a needle in my drill press slightly larger than my stitching needles.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    La Cygne, KS
    Posts
    689
    I too use a needle slightly larger than what I stitch with to punch the holes. I prefer the press to be running on its slowest speed. For me it seems to help the needle pass through the leather better and also help reduce how much the needle shaft flexes.

    Chris

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Utah, USA
    Posts
    2,214

    Using a drill press.

    Changing from punches to the press really increased my quality....big time. However much of what I was doing at the time involved thicker and/or stacked leather projects. My ability to maintain hole alignment on multiple stacked parts was simply horrible. So much better results by drilling after contact cement assembly.

    As others have already mentioned, be sure to keep the item on a level plane, or wonky results may follow. I've had my fair share of projects that look great on one side, but the other side has looked like a "sight challenged" person used power tools for the very first time.

    Many suggest using a needle or awl tip. With drill running, or not. I've only used a drill bit, running. Don't know the size, but it is the smallest bit I've ever seen. It does remove material, so keep that in mind if thread is thin. And I also have been using a rather thick, heavily waxed thread, that has needed an enlarged hole. At least, that is, in order to save my sanity, needle breakage, or finger and palm damage.



    •••••••••••••••

    Sent from my mind....using Tap-a-Thought. (tm)n
    Last edited by bflying; 03-13-2017 at 04:30 AM.
    Sometimes the light's all shinin' on me; Other times, I can barely see.
    Lately it occurs to me..... What a long, strange trip it's been.

  8. #8
    Hey thanks so much for your help, it sounds like there is no right/wrong way to do it. From my perspective, I was just thinking of how hard it is to push an threaded needle or awl thru 3 layers of leather and there must be an easier way. Since I had read about the drill press method and have one, thought I might ask. Think I will give it a try and perhaps weigh in on my perspective later. Sounds like the important thing is keeping the leather on a level plane so the holes are straight front and back.
    Thanks again and best wishes.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Utah, USA
    Posts
    2,214

    Using a drill press.

    Here is a stacker I made a while back for my ZT0180. Where the hardware trim piece lands, there are seven layers of varying thicknesses (from 4-12oz) of leather, not including the strap. On something like this, I simply can't imagine hand stitching without a drilled hole, with material removed. But that's just in my limited experience.

    My skills are still in the very early novice stage. So I love discussions like this, because I end up learning a ton from everyone that pipes in. Often it's a Pro challenging me on my choices. I've learned so much in this corner of the forum. I've also accepted the fact that leatherwork is partially art. So have fun trying different methods of (pick any topic), and feel ok with whatever works for you.



    Edit: Doh! Changed # to oz. That would have been some thick stuff.

    •••••••••••••••

    Sent from my mind....using Tap-a-Thought. (tm)
    Last edited by bflying; 03-14-2017 at 03:01 PM.
    Sometimes the light's all shinin' on me; Other times, I can barely see.
    Lately it occurs to me..... What a long, strange trip it's been.

  10. #10
    bflying, I thought 3 layers was a lot. Thanks for the encouragement, I believe your are correct as IMO all of knife making relatively speaking can be very much artistic expression. That includes the leather work also.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Looking for Buck folding Kalingas.
    Posts
    1,869
    Here is an early sheath drill pressed and hand stitched. Buy good quality drill bits, less drifting or should I say flex. Wood bit. I'm enjoying my leather machine

    [IMG][/IMG][IMG][/IMG]
    Buy membership.

  12. #12
    I use a drill press, with a smooth punch just big enough to shove a needle through the hole. I stopped using drill bits thanks to advice from this forum. You want the leather to be able to "heal" back around the stitching, it will lock your thread together. I've found this to be true in my limited experience.

    Here's one of mine that's ten layers of 8-9oz in the pouch and piggyback area.

    No Regrets! Inducted Blade 2014, DaPorker


  13. #13
    Da: Please what do you mean by a smooth punch. You guys all do great work.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Kerrville, Texas
    Posts
    4,045
    A number 27 or 28 heavy stitcher needle would make a very good piercing punch chucked up in the drill press (Not running). Still a very good idea to lube the needle with either paraffin wax or bee's wax every few stokes. Make it much easier to pierce the leather.

    The foregoing is not a good idea for thicknesses 3/4" and up. The needle is not strong enough for that.

    Paul
    Last edited by sheathmaker; 03-20-2017 at 10:52 PM.
    Instructional DVDs at*** http://chriscrawfordknives.com/home/***via digital download https://streaming.chriscrawfordknives.com/shop/140697
    Paul Long------108 Briarwood Ln. W------Kerrville, TX---78028-9311----830 367 5536

  15. #15
    Thank you Paul for the help. I can't imagine doing more than 2 or 3 layers, but will ask again for help if I do more.

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by golfer1 View Post
    Da: Please what do you mean by a smooth punch. You guys all do great work.
    My punch started out as a brad nail, I removed the head, sanded it down smaller and polished it. I use it with the drill press running at low speed.

    Thank you
    No Regrets! Inducted Blade 2014, DaPorker


  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    NorCal
    Posts
    81
    I'm just a beginner, but have run through several implements in my drill press. I started with a regular 1/16 drill bit. The normal point on a drill bit is not conducive to accuracy, so I tried grinding a finer point on the bit. It worked much better. After reading here about making holes without material removal, I tried a Tandy awl bit. It worked nicely, but the taper made consistent hole sizing difficult. Next, and current, method is 1/16 tool steel drill rod I bought from McMaster-Carr. I ground a nice ogival point on it and polished it to 1000 grit. I run the drill press at a wood drilling (high) speed. Just glides right through. YMMV

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 1999
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    7,050
    I've tried the drill press and punch.
    Going thru the leather wasn't much of a problem.
    Getting the leather off the punch was an issue at times.

    Tips?
    Tricks?

  19. #19
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Kerrville, Texas
    Posts
    4,045
    Use either paraffin wax or bees wax to lube the punch every three or four strokes. You will see a big difference.

    Paul
    Instructional DVDs at*** http://chriscrawfordknives.com/home/***via digital download https://streaming.chriscrawfordknives.com/shop/140697
    Paul Long------108 Briarwood Ln. W------Kerrville, TX---78028-9311----830 367 5536

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 1999
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    7,050
    That's it?
    Sounds way too simple...

    Thank you

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •