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Thread: Looking to purchase a chopper

  1. #21
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    How about a nine inch blade?

    If it is going to be dedicated to chopping and batoning then look for something that is really designed just for that. Like the Buck chopping Froe. Decent steel and leather sheath. Less than one C note, you will still have some cash left. Just a thought.

    Besides, every guy should like an extra 2 inches.

  2. #22
    I've had rats and bacon but this is my first dog. From what I gather it's a great chopper.
    Quote Originally Posted by sfrigon1 View Post
    Yeah busse and kin make some solid choppers it looks like

  3. #23
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    The fiddleback forge camp knife is 3V, and they will occasionally pop up on the for sale area here. That would be a good 6-7 inch fixed blade.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by ATJ999 View Post
    The fiddleback forge camp knife is 3V, and they will occasionally pop up on the for sale area here. That would be a good 6-7 inch fixed blade.
    Think I can find one for 250?

  5. #25
    Fiddlebacks rock - but I doubt, that you will find that for $250 (I didnt check though).

  6. #26
    So, just now did check - if thats the FF Camp Knife, they charge $350, so outside your parametre of 250 bucks.

    I suppose one could be had for close to 250 in well used condition.

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by GREENJACKET View Post
    (Something I think is ridiculously expensive but really cool is the Titanium canteen by Heavy Cover. That and the Skrama will blow your budget).
    One can never have too much titanium!

    I looked at the Heavy Cover canteen a while ago but with ti cups, bottles, ti Jetboil etc, Im covered in he canteen department. The HC canteen is dang nice though.

    Just bought the Russian E-tool and its little brother for good measure.

    They are both good quality, great fun and weigh next to nothing in the ruck.

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by GREENJACKET View Post
    I sort of try to keep that finer edge but its starting to blend in. Its easy enough to keep ridiculously sharp, though the tip gets some real abuse and I'm letting it thicken up to get a bit more steel behind that part. Ask me in another year when its got to a natural practical sharpened grind that tools that have done a lot of work find.
    Good thing its so controllable, because I like to keep mine on the keen side.
    Yes, I read about you hitting a wall and putting a nick in the blade.

    The first nick in a brand new blade hurts - it gets easier after that.

  9. #29
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by sfrigon1 View Post
    Yeah busse and kin make some solid choppers it looks like
    This seems to be the best way to go for a chopping blade

    Also, the ESEE Junglas would be in the price range, about 10 inches though..
    Last edited by Dair; 03-20-2017 at 10:03 PM.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by sfrigon1 View Post
    I'm sorry I just meant that I wanted something around 7 in that I could chop with. So what exactly is the minimum size a chopper can be ?
    It really depends on what kind of chopping you are planning on doing. As other folks have mentioned, you can get something that will do some light chopping in that range, but my experience has been that 10" and up is when you start getting into more efficient choppers. It isn't that you can't chop with a smaller knife, it's just that the larger ones tend to be more efficient at it.

    A lot of folks prefer to just carry one knife, so for them what you are describing makes sense. I prefer to have a large blade for chopping, batoning, and that sort of stuff and a smaller fixed blade for other things. One thing you will find if you look at the larger choppers is that a good one can be had for a relatively low price. That can leave you a fair bit of money to get a smaller knife for uses where a large one would be awkward.

  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by BladeScout View Post
    One can never have too much titanium!

    I looked at the Heavy Cover canteen a while ago but with ti cups, bottles, ti Jetboil etc, Im covered in he canteen department. The HC canteen is dang nice though.

    Just bought the Russian E-tool and its little brother for good measure.

    They are both good quality, great fun and weigh next to nothing in the ruck.
    Agreed on the titanium.
    HC Titanium Canteen set is a good one.
    Ti E-tool was a good find, well up to the task. Individual or team tool, well worth the carry weight. (Cold Steel's Spetz Spade cover fits nicely and a better quality).

    First nicks go with the territory for user blades. Good to get it out of the way. Next ten years to put a patina on it. Think we all love new and all love vintage; its the bit in between thats not so nice. Too much modern kit goes shabby too fast and never quite goes vintage.

  12. #32
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    The 1311 is indeed the best chopper I've wielded. The OP wanted a 6"-7" knife, so I suggested the FB Camp Knife.

    The 1311 in all its glory after a major fatwood harvest!

    Life is like a box of chocolates, you never know what you're gonna get!



  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by sfrigon1 View Post
    omg yes! Whats the steel and how much?
    The steel is 3v and it's a rather large chunk of 3v at that! They can be had for a little under $300 if you look hard enough!
    Life is like a box of chocolates, you never know what you're gonna get!



  14. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by GREENJACKET View Post
    Agreed on the titanium.
    HC Titanium Canteen set is a good one.
    Ti E-tool was a good find, well up to the task. Individual or team tool, well worth the carry weight. (Cold Steel's Spetz Spade cover fits nicely and a better quality).
    The ti E-tool is great as is the smaller ti shovel.

    I made my own cover. Its just a quick and dirty job as itll be for work - not for show. Solid though.

    I deliberately went after a ti E-tool with no cover, as the cover on the ones sold with the cover didnt look appealing to me.

    If I want a more light weight cover instead of the leather cover, Ive been contemplating converting my Glock E-tool cover. I might look into the CS Spetz Spade cover. Before the Russian ti E-tool popped up on my radar, I had been looking at the CS spade. Might still buy one for the boot (as in trunk) although more tempted to just buy another ti E-tool.

    I sanded down the handle on the E-tool and oiled it - as it had somewhat generous dimensions from the factory. Now the wood to metal fit is more aligned. Apart from the sanding and making the cover, I havent messed with it....well, apart from using it for its purpose of course.

    What awesome quality for the money.





    Last edited by BladeScout; 03-21-2017 at 06:10 AM.

  15. #35
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    Nice job you have done there on the Ti Spade. I sanded and oiled the handle on mine.
    The CS Spetsnaz Special Forces shovel weighs a ton. The cover fits the Ti one perfectly, think its a pretty standard well tested design. The CS handles with some whittling fit too but are of a heavier wood. The CS SF is a good tool if on the very heavy side; not bad for a truck tool, tree root beater. Its great as a sports throwing fun thing as its easy to throw and flies true. Beats the heck out of the target board. However, I don't throw the Ti ones as I like them and don't want to give them that much grief.

    Think the OP will end up with a Junglas or something solid like the 1311 to beat on. We have all been there. Still think the Skrama is the way to go for a practical to weight to utility tool. Anyhow, the news has got out as they keep selling out as fast as they make them.

  16. #36
    TY.

    Nope, dont throw my ti E-tool either.

    Just checked; the sheath/cover for the CS Spets can had separately and for not a lot of money - thats a no brainer.

    Getting a SKRAMA as well.

  17. #37
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    Lionsteel nsteel m7 is a great do it all type of knife
    Chops good too
    Survivor number 7
    BeckerHead number 115

  18. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Revolverrodger View Post
    Lionsteel nsteel m7 is a great do it all type of knife
    Chops good too
    yes I was comparing the M7 to the knife research legion ,they both fit my criteria pretty well. They are very similar , have you or anyone else held the two of them ?

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
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    Rat 7- 89
    Falkniven A1-200
    ESEE 6-130
    Cold Steel Recon Scout-117
    BK-7

    Lots of decent options in your price range,,

  20. #40
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    I'd recommend one of the following:
    BK5
    BK7
    BK9
    Browning Crowell Barker Competition Knife

    None of them are over $150, leaving you with extra cash to buy another knife or a decent sharpener/strop/compound...etc.

    I have a Crowell Barker, and it chops really well. I use it to keep the trails in the hills near my house passable. The BK's work well, too, and come across as more rugged and brutish (I mean that is a very positive sense), but something about the handle and blade geometry of the Crowell Barker really helps it breeze thru branches as thick as 1-1/2" or more. Convex edge is easy to maintain, too. Another feature that of the knife is the forward lanyard hole. Put hand thru lanyard so that the lanyard rests on the back of you hand. Twist your hand over, and then under the lanyard in a rotating fashion, and the knife will hover just below your palm without tipping or twisting. It doesn't interfere with chopping or using the knife, and it gives more control than a rear-mounted lanyard does. The balance of the knife is great for this. Best prime-rib and pork roast slicer I ever used, too.

    The BK7 and BK9, while not the best choppers BK offers, are just plain great knives.

    BK20 would be really hot, but might push the envelope on the price depending on where you get one.

    Another option. Get a BK2. They chop well and feel like a big knife, but are small enough to be used for more than just hack and slash. I just stripped and reprofiled two. Put a 20 deg. edge on one and a 25 deg. on the other. I plan on trying them in the woods this weekend and see which angle I prefer. Probably my favorite knife. Inexpensive, rugged as hell, and great personality.

    My suggestion would be to get both a Browning Crowell Barker, and a Becker BK2 or BK7. Should be doable for $250.

    Good luck.

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