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Thread: What are Teddy Kardin knives worth?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    Louisiana
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    What are Teddy Kardin knives worth?


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    i got a few custom knives from him made for me back in the 90's.
    he is real popular in Indonesia. Anyone in the U.S. heard of him? How does he rate?

  2. #2
    I am familiar with the guy, I actually visited his shop when I went to Indonesia 3 years ago. He makes good looking knives, the engraving is pretty nice. I think he's a pretty nice guy (I had to talk to him using a translator).

    You can see some of his pieces on ebay from time to time, but they never sold.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Connecticut
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    <---- Here's one!

    The knife used in my avatar is a Kardin knife I have. Actually I ordered and purchased five of his knives last summer. This particular one is called the 'Punan hunter' and I STILL think the lines are wonderful.

    They were very accomodating and helpful, and sent me computer-generated pictures of the knives I wanted with the handle materials I chose. At least THIS part was very high tech...

    I say they, because although his name is used, he employs a small entourage of apprentices to help make these.

    Upon arrival, they weren't packed very carefully (...at all) and one of the buttcaps was completely broken off from shipping. An email and pics from my end got them to remake and resend another right away.

    My only comment (and it's a big one) is that these knives now have enough shrinkage in the handles to have gaps in them at the spacers. They are just about a year and a half old. Not very pretty now. The woods they used at the time must not have been dried up enough. They finish their knives with a laquer coating and it may not be the best finish for handles. Not my choice, but I was new at this then.

    I guess I could make a fuss, and if it was an American maker, I would. I think I'll just stay away from them now and concentrate on even better quality. Live and learn...



    Coop
    Jim Cooper - Capturing the Artistry and Significance of Handmade Knives. • Makers: Read Post 815 AND Post 891 •
    • 2014 Website - Below • SBC on Facebook •

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Florida
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    holy Sh!t! i dont believe it...there awwwwwwsome

  5. #5
    Wow, I never knew that part of the story. I saw and handled some of his pieces at his shop, and I tought they were well-built and worth the money. I guess time is the best way to get to know with something.

  6. #6
    Hmmm... Will'em,

    Which part is awwwwwsome ? The broken butt cap or the shrinking handle ?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    Louisiana
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    i am sorry to hear about your misfortune, i went with bone handles so i didn't run the risk of shrinkage. any idea on value?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2000
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    Canada
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    Rigger, bone shrinks. If the bone is not properly dried it may shrink quite a bit. Even when dried for years it may move a little.

  9. #9
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    Somewhere near Gondor, Lake district, Cumbria, Middle Earth.
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    What's a knife worth??

    Hello,

    Nothing, if you don't like or want it!!, though in the ultimate analysis, how much you desire it, and whatever, and how much you are prepared to pay for it, determines it's value to you.

    It's very objective. A knife that you would 'kill' for, may be the object of anothers loathing. That's why there are always good bargains to be had on the Exchange.

    Regards,

    Doug

  10. #10
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    FYI: At the time I purchased five TK knives. Four of which I resold on eBay for a small profit. I kept the broken buttcap model (above) nd sanded and glued the cap back on. You can't tell it was unattached by handling, but it doesn't have the strength of the original. For a 'presentation' knife it is perfectly usable. My ethics won't allow me to sell this knife with defects undisclosed so I kept it. I sold the replacement, though! These two are the one's I have left.

    They now accept credit cards. I had to wire transfer to a bank account from my bank for these purchases then. (You can only imagine the queries I had to face wanting to buy *knives* from a relatively unknown source in Indonesia!) They were very inexpensive: Damascus was $150, 'Engraved' was $135. The engraving is done by etching.

    The material shrinking is my ONLY gripe with this transaction. These guys were very, very polite and accomodating, and I still feel these are some of the nicest looking knives in my collection--from a style-only standpoint. I was allowed to choose the handle materials and they delivered exactly as I wanted. It's for that reason I still like them and keep them. You may do quite well with the stag version, and I'd love to see the finished knife.

    http://www.javaknives.com/

    Coop
    Jim Cooper - Capturing the Artistry and Significance of Handmade Knives. • Makers: Read Post 815 AND Post 891 •
    • 2014 Website - Below • SBC on Facebook •

  11. #11
    I own 5 of Kardins and luckily I never face a shrinkage. maybe because i just hang them on the wall ?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
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    fullerton, ca
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    My only comment (and it's a big one) is that these knives now have enough shrinkage in the handles to have gaps in them at the spacers. They are just about a year and a half old. Not very pretty now. The woods they used at the time must not have been dried up enough. They finish their knives with a laquer coating and it may not be the best finish for handles. Not my choice, but I was new at this then.
    The shrinkage is probably due to the fact that Indonesia is a VERY humid country. The wood is probably "dried" in 80% humidity air. Some shrinkage is bound to happen when it is stored in the USA. If the knife is kept in a similar climate e.g. Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore it will probably be fine.

  13. #13
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    New York
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    That sounds about right, and it's actually probably around 90% humidity in the summer

  14. #14
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  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    nomaden in this planet at the moment bushwalking down under
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    Quote Originally Posted by kamkazmoto View Post
    The shrinkage is probably due to the fact that Indonesia is a VERY humid country. The wood is probably "dried" in 80% humidity air. Some shrinkage is bound to happen when it is stored in the USA. If the knife is kept in a similar climate e.g. Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore it will probably be fine.
    And also on that time (2002) they might be not use any PEG to stabilize the wood. If they thinking about to have a good worldwide market, they should consider and prepare for that.

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