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Thread: DIY Heat treat furnace

  1. #21
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    Taylor, Michigan
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  2. #22
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    WA
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    Tom, those Sugar Creek kilns are a great price, but the description on their site, along with their price, pretty much ensures they are not programmable. You can certainly use a non-programmable controller for heat treating, but it can limit your options. Another thing that I would find unacceptable is the top-hinged door. You would need to hold the door with one hand while working with hot steel in the other. When I am working with 2000 F steel, I like to have both hands free.

  3. #23
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    Jun 2001
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    Brownville Maine
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fox
    Tom, those Sugar Creek kilns are a great price, but the description on their site, along with their price, pretty much ensures they are not programmable. You can certainly use a non-programmable controller for heat treating, but it can limit your options. Another thing that I would find unacceptable is the top-hinged door. You would need to hold the door with one hand while working with hot steel in the other. When I am working with 2000 F steel, I like to have both hands free.
    I think you have a point there, the word infinite switch bothers me..
    you'll need two hands and that hot door coming down on you would just plain suck..I know at 2K deg's I don't want to stand there too long messing with it either..the even-heat I think you can order it left or right hand door too.

  4. #24
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    judt flip it on the side.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sweany
    judt flip it on the side.
    there you go

  6. #26
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    Sep 2003
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    Fox and Dan

    It doesn't say on the sugar creek site but they have a programable control that they can fit, about $350 if I remember right, It's been a long time since I talked to them. The home made kiln doesn't have a controller either so what ever you use for one you can use for the other. I was just pointing out that if you want you can pay another $50 or $100 to have someone build it for you. They seemed to be nice people when I talked to them a few months back and maybe it was just my impression but I think they would put the door anyway you wanted it. BTW the door is meant to flip over and lay on the top.

    Tom

  7. #27
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    Aug 2004
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    If any of you guys are thinking of building a big HT oven,here is an idea...
    I used to cast at a professional setup.The oven chamber was about 12X24X24,and the door was a vertical lift.It swung out about three inches to unseat the wedge shaped door from the front of the oven,and then moved straight up until it was clear of the chamber.The action was controlled by a foot pedal.Sort of like a little giant hammer control.Step down - door up.Hands free to hold flask tongs.Seems like a good system for a HT oven.
    Stacy E.Apelt
    It is better to die fighting evil than to live under it.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Abingdon, VA
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    551
    Hello All
    It has been a few years since I have posted on Blade Forums but thought I would jump in on this thread.

    I built an oven based on the plans you are dicussing. I did add a 1in. thick layer of inswool around the sides and top, between the brick and the sheet metal.
    The oven semms to work very well. It will get too 2000 deg. F in about 20 min. and the controller i used will hold the temp. within 10 deg.
    The outside of the oven stay cool, but I have not run it for hours on end.
    I would like to thank Andy for making these plans avalible it was a fun project
    to work on.

    Thank you all your sharing of knowledge on this forum.

  9. #29
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    Aug 2005
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    Southern Alberta
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    Hey guys. Maybe I asked a stupid question or maybe I should have started a new thread but could someone post a simple drawing of the electrical from the plug in the wall to the elements. It would sure give me a little piece of mind to have a description of the wiring from someone that has done this. Thanks. Dave

  10. #30
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    an exotic third world locale :)
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    ive found a good place to get the heating elements. http://www.kanthal.com/ im quite sure they can make them to any lenght/wattage you want. also thermocouple wires

  11. #31
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    Sand Springs OK
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  12. #32
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    Here is some more information on building your own oven that might be useful.
    Regards,
    Greg

  13. #33
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    Dec 2002
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    You know this would a great project for a hammer-in type workshop.
    ever body get together buy in bulk ,split the costs and divy up the labor over a weekend and go home with an oven.

  14. #34

    In this Forum Much fear in building home made oven I sense

    Afraid be not

    Seriously, it is very simple to do. With Ebay, you can get contolling electornics for dirt cheap: SSR, Controller, K-thermocouple and then
    all you need is to mortar few grooved bricks together. Bricks are so
    soft you can literally grove then with your nails.

    See the link to my DYI oven in one of prev posts in this thread.

    I strongly recommend top-load ovens.

    About fear of shorting of spirals with your blades - won't happen, unless
    you're doing it while under influence. Yes, the temp inside of the oven will rage in 2000F+ range but on the outside, you will be able to touch the exterior with your bare hands. Also, the spirals, when properly tucked in,
    won't stick outta groves.

    The oven won't explode or anything like that so you're 100% safe.

    When firing, I do keep an eye on it - which is a common-sense-thing-to-do. Heat-treating your own steel is so much fun - you'll love it.

    YOu will be able to heat treat ANY steel.

    Again, don't go with ovens large than what you need to HT knifes.

    4x4x18 is about ideal and with 240V circuit you will be able to have
    excellent thermodynamics - reaching 1200F in about 1 minute, 1500F
    in 2-3 mins and 1900F in about 10m, much faster is you pre-heat the oven.

    It is a good idea to preheat to about 1000F for 10m or so, to drive any
    moisture out of oven, before you start heat treating. The firebrick is very
    porous.

  15. #35
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    Sand Springs OK
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    Thanks Rashid

    Why the top load oven? Just easier to handle the steel or what?

  16. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sweany
    Thanks Rashid

    Why the top load oven? Just easier to handle the steel or what?
    for retaining hair and heat I'd go with a bottom loading unit

  17. #37
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    Dec 2002
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    Sand Springs OK
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    I got mine done this afternoon


  18. #38
    Got a pic of your tongs, Mike?

  19. #39
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    Brownville Maine
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sweany
    I got mine done this afternoon

    here's mine it works best if you give it the bird a few times a week

  20. #40
    About top loading: one day I am hoping to run argon into the thing.
    As long as the oven is enclosed into tin or steel frame and it is rather
    air-tight (aluminum foil tape from HD is all you need), argon, being heavier than air, will stay in it when you lift the top.

    At least one well known maker does it this way - apparently with great
    reasults. I think he visits here every now and then and may be will comment on it.

    Inert atmosphere will make heat treating tool and stainless steels easier,
    as one won't need to mess with stainless foil (I cut my fingers more times
    than I care to admit ... that thing is sharp and cuts deep , gloves are an
    absolute must.

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