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Thread: Did you know? STR's Tips and Tricks for knife care

  1. #21
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    Well not really. I would recommend an oven for that steel. Contact Bob Dozier at his shop and see if he or Dan can do it for you when they heat treat all the rest of their D2 blades. He has done that for me on two occasions and they were quite nice and very good to deal with and also very reasonable price wise. Bob and crew are great folks. http://www.dozierknives.com/

    If they can't help you I'd suggest contacting Texas Knifemake supply and asking them to do it for you and get their instructions for mailing. Shouldn't be too much that way if you use them either and you will have the option of having it cryo treated through them if you want to go for that. Bob doesn't do that if its important to you. 1-888-461-8632

    STR
    STR's Blog & contact info


    I make no apologies for being unable to maintain a monogamous relationship with a folding knife!

  2. #22
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    to prevent rust on 1095, keep a 2" x 2" x 1" thick foam pad in your toolbox, tacklebox or pack and a little bottle of INHIBITOR oil or similar. drip a few drops of oil onto the foam pad and wipe down the blade before and after use.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by STR View Post
    Do you often carry a favorite chisel grind folder from Emerson or one of the other makers doing one this way with the one side grind? If so you probably have run into the same problem sharpening these on the Sharpmaker or other similarly styled sharpeners as some others have.

    Try this method next time you go to maintenance the edge and see if it doesn't help you out a lot.

    First hold the knife against the opposing rod sharpener on your sharpmaker and lay it flat on the rod to get its angle. First stick them in the 30` slots ( picture 1) You may or may not be able to tell I forgot to do that for my demo pics but for the purpose of showing what I mean these still work.

    Then move the knife over to the sharpening rod on the left keeping it at the same angle as the right side rod and sharpen the edge using this angle on your Emerson when using the Sharpmaker or other similar sharpener with ceramic rods. (Picture 2)

    Once sharpened on the grind side pull out the rod and laying the flat surface on the flat of the blade just run the edge back side gently across the hone to remove the burr. Finish up by some hard strops on the back cardboard of a legal pad on a hard surface and you should be good to go.

    STR
    Thanks for this post STR.

    I just bought my first Emerson and this helped me a huge amount to sharpen it on my Spyderco sharpmaker.


  4. #24
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    STR,

    Thank you for sharing. I'd like to add a bit from my recent experience.

    Just stumbled to Ankerson's failed Manix 2 test, I decided to test my Enlan 02 lock. To my dismay, it failed 100% if 'whacked' like Ankerson. So far, the test I did was at most hard tapping against my arm or leg, if it hurts & the lock stays, it passes.

    It came to conclusion that lock spring (any kind) is to keep the lock seated for static load. However, an impact (depend on how sharp & strong), might unseat the lock momentarily. We know impact is force divide by time, thus knocking the spine against a hard surface is different from softer or flexible/yielding surface (the time factor)

    Here, what helps to keep the lock seated is friction of the mating surface. By design, liner lock, frame lock & axis (or it's kind) depend on this. Back lock to some extend & Triad (definitely) do not, as by design, it has less tendency to slip.

    After dismantling the blade & cleaning up the mating surface, it solved the slippage. I didn't want to do that assembled, as the water & soap might get into the spring chamber & causing rust.

    Thus it's a bad idea to lube the mating surface.
    Some might say the lock can get slippery during real use (water, oil, sweat), and that is true.

    As you always stress to us, knowing the limitation & paying more attention, is key to safety during use.

    What do you think of this?
    Last edited by Chris "Anagarika"; 12-28-2011 at 12:56 AM. Reason: spelling

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris "Anagarika" View Post
    STR,

    Thank you for sharing. I'd like to add a bit from my recent experience.

    Just stumbled to Ankerson's failed Manix 2 test, I decided to test my Enlan 02 lock. To my dismay, it failed 100% if 'whacked' like Ankerson. So far, the test I did was at most hard tapping against my arm or leg, if it hurts & the lock stays, it passes.

    It came to conclusion that lock spring (any kind) is to keep the lock seated for static load. However, an impact (depend on how sharp & strong), might unseat the lock momentarily. We know impact is force divide by time, thus knocking the spine against a hard surface is different from softer or flexible/yielding surface (the time factor)

    Here, what helps to keep the lock seated is friction of the mating surface. By design, liner lock, frame lock & axis (or it's kind) depend on this. Back lock to some extend & Triad (definitely) do not, as by design, it has less tendency to slip.

    After dismantling the blade & cleaning up the mating surface, it solved the slippage. I didn't want to do that assembled, as the water & soap might get into the spring chamber & causing rust.

    Thus it's a bad idea to lube the mating surface.
    Some might say the lock can get slippery during real use (water, oil, sweat), and that is true.

    As you always stress to us, knowing the limitation & paying more attention, is key to safety during use.

    What do you think of this?

    An awful lot of them fail simple tests of just pressure alone but the thing about a liner lock is that many of them may fail the tests at first and then go on after that working in becoming harder and harder to defeat as it is pushed over and over again to that point of something having to give. In some this actually has made them work in enough to then become reliable users. I've seen liner locks pass test after test after test only to then fail it for no reason really and then watched as those same knives proceed to go on passing the taps that earlier defeated them and doing so again like always and other testers have reported this also. It appears to be within what we would call the nature of the lock and that inherent unpredictable nature of it is what makes the liner lock one that throws up red flags for many. Personally it doesn't throw up any with me because I think if you are sensible with the way you use any knife you can use it and make it work. Knowing the limitations of each knife and how it tends to behave under certain loads is a plus but many never get to that point of intimacy with their EDC. Sudden shock to the lock contact on any type lock can affect it in ways that make it hard to predict. Having an oily film or wet contact can certainly affect how the lock behaves in this type of set up yes so I'd recommend it being dry. In the end if the lock won't stay put it really doesn't matter how strong it is because its never going to reach the limits of what it can do since it pops off way before that limit is even reached. You might see this old post on my blogger as of interest. http://strsbackyardknifeworks.blogsp...dc-folder.html

    So, to get to your next ? As for lube? I like a dry knife as much as possible. If I dab a little spot of grease on the detent ball I try real hard to keep it from building up. The oils and greases attract lint and grit which just adds things in there to grind against stuff so to me they counter what you really want to avoid. So what happens is that you have this grease in there and people blow the dust out of their knives at times and then blow it right into the grease and oil trap in the pivot and of course pocket lint and the dirts and grind outside get in there and next thing you know when you maintenance it is that the washers appear all scratched up or one is torn.
    STR's Blog & contact info


    I make no apologies for being unable to maintain a monogamous relationship with a folding knife!

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    6° down from equator, GMT +7
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    3,996
    Saw that blog post. It is the same thing that happened to Cliff Stamp's CRKT Point Guard liner lock. If it gets defeated that way, it still protects the user as there's no way the blade will close. You have a very valid point. Other locks, when failed, will be catastrophic. Liner/frame lock done this way, might still prevent further injury.

    After cleaning the Enlan, the lock stays put. No more budging, even with whacking. Contrary to your advice, I still test it that way, to find out if the slippage was caused by overlubricating.
    Last edited by Chris "Anagarika"; 12-31-2011 at 11:53 AM.

  7. #27

    That's just pure genius, thanks.

    Quote Originally Posted by STR View Post
    Do you often carry a favorite chisel grind folder from Emerson or one of the other makers doing one this way with the one side grind? If so you probably have run into the same problem sharpening these on the Sharpmaker or other similarly styled sharpeners as some others have.

    Try this method next time you go to maintenance the edge and see if it doesn't help you out a lot.

    First hold the knife against the opposing rod sharpener on your sharpmaker and lay it flat on the rod to get its angle. First stick them in the 30` slots ( picture 1) You may or may not be able to tell I forgot to do that for my demo pics but for the purpose of showing what I mean these still work.

    Then move the knife over to the sharpening rod on the left keeping it at the same angle as the right side rod and sharpen the edge using this angle on your Emerson when using the Sharpmaker or other similar sharpener with ceramic rods. (Picture 2)

    Once sharpened on the grind side pull out the rod and laying the flat surface on the flat of the blade just run the edge back side gently across the hone to remove the burr. Finish up by some hard strops on the back cardboard of a legal pad on a hard surface and you should be good to go.

    STR
    Even looking at the photos it took me a while to get it, geometry never my strong suit. A brilliantly simple solution, thanks.

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