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Thread: M. Klein & Sons Knives

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    M. Klein & Sons Knives


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    Hi all,

    A little over a week ago, my company decided to send me to Las Vegas for a couple days on business. If you're not so much the gambling type, and the wife can't get off work to join you, Vegas is pretty dull when you're all by your lonesome. So I do some wandering.

    On day number one, I had about four hours between the time my plane landed and my first appointment, and decided to check out the local Bass Pro Shop. It was fun for about an hour, and I did fondle the offerings of Case, Hen and Rooster, and Boker. I discovered how large the normal Sodbuster truly is, and how its size belies its weight. However, the store is nigh identical to the one in San Bernardino, which is closest to my home, so it was nothing new to write home about.

    Fast forward to that evening. I decided to peruse an antique mall that I had seen driving up LV Blvd, about 3 miles south of the Strip (I was staying at South Point, which is about as far south in Vegas you can get and still call it Vegas). The parking lot was absolutely empty, and I thought the place was closed. Fortunately, it wasn't

    As I wandered through the aisles and stalls, I couldn't help be surprised at what some people call antiques. Star Wars toys from episode two, which is circa 2002. Half-melted VHS cassettes. Dr. Seuss book reproductions from the nineties. People were willing to sell anything, it seems.

    I notice several stalls with knife paraphernalia: a Boker peanut, not unlike the one that was offered as a giveaway not too long ago, a Buck Prince, various specialty cigar knives, and company sponsored SAKs. And lots and lots of no-name crap.

    Toward the end of my counterclockwise tour, I struck up a conversation with a very nice gentleman named Don. He asked what I was looking at and what I collect, and I mentioned antique pocket knives. He came back with a box full of stuff. Some was junk, although there was a Leatherman PST II w/ sheathe in great condition that I'm kicking myself for not picking up. There were also a bunch of SAK knock offs, and some Imperials with more sideways play than back and forth motion, and other random stuff. One that really caught my attention was an M Klein & Sons coping blade, which I originally mistook for a sheepsfoot.



    He's an old feller, but in great condition. Great walk and talk, a very handsome patina, well worn wooden handle, a bail (which I absolutely adore), and no corrosion to speak of whatsoever. Whoever owned this one obviously took good care of it. The tang reads "M Klein & Sons", over "Chicago", over "Made in USA".

    I had never heard of this cutler, so I employed a little Google-fu on my part. I found out that the company itself was founded in 1857, and is now Klein tools. These types of knives are still available on their website, along with a couple others. There was an equally aged hawkbill, but I opted against it. I don't think the wife would have liked me bringing home more knives than I need to

    All in all, it's a nice knife that has already seen some pocket time since it's light, with a blade style that is unique among my other pocket knives. I like it a lot

    Here it is next to my Case large stockman (sheepsfoot extended) and GEC 3" Barlow for comparison:


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    Freiburg i. B., Germany
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    I have one that is exactly like yours. Very useful when doing some electrical work.



    Peter

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    Las Vegas
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    If you know and don't mind telling me, what was he asking the the hawkbill. If the price is right I might head up there after work and take a look at it.

  4. #4
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    I don't know off hand, but it can't be more than $25. The coping blade was originally $20, but he lowered down to $10. His booth was on the far left when you first enter, where the glass cases were. I think the name of the place was America's Antique Mall, or something similar. It looked to be in pretty good condition, although I didn't handle it thoroughly.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    Las Vegas
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    Thank you, Getahl. I appreciate the info.

  6. #6
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    Dec 2007
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    No sweat. It was an interesting store

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    San Diego, CA
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    Klein Tools is the tool manufacturer for electricians.

    Nice find!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    Northern Galilee Hills, Israel
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    Quote Originally Posted by knarfeng View Post
    Klein Tools is the tool manufacturer for electricians.

    Nice find!
    Klein for hand tools and safety Linemans belts.
    Ideal makes electrical testers and then went in to copies of Klien hand tools.
    Channellock also moved from Channel Lock pliers to electrical hand tools.

    Klein and Ideal sold work knives.
    I do not know, but I doubt they manufactured them.

    Colonial, Camillus, and Queen all made electricians knives.

  9. #9
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    Jul 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by neeman View Post
    Klein for hand tools and safety Linemans belts.
    Ideal makes electrical testers and then went in to copies of Klien hand tools.
    Channellock also moved from Channel Lock pliers to electrical hand tools.

    Klein and Ideal sold work knives.
    I do not know, but I doubt they manufactured them.

    Colonial, Camillus, and Queen all made electricians knives.
    Well of course you are right on all points.

    Funny thing is today the church asked me to do a small electrical fix-it. In taking out my tool belt I happened to notice that I still have an old Klein electrician's knife in my pouch. My boss gave it to me on my first day of electrical work in about 1978. He looked at what tools I had brought, then dug around in his used tool bin and added a couple. One of them was this knife, which was pretty old even then. We did home remodels and we used a hawkbill blade to open up the old style romex that was wrapped in fiber reinforced cardboard type insulation. I had brought a knife, but it wasn't a hawkbill.

    Now that I finished the job at church, Here are pics of my old Klein knife.
    (the brass sticking up is a liner lock for the screwdriver blade.)

    BTW, electricians (or at least this one) like electricians knives with a bale because even when you store it with the blade open, when it is in your pouch it is short compared to everything else and the bale lets you grab it more easily.





  10. #10
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    Here is mine

    I think the handle is some form of "particle" wood?
    I don't think it is plastic

  11. #11
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    I've been toying with the notion of picking up an electrician's knife. Maybe one with a clip point and the screwdriver.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    In a state of indifference.
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    I know how great yellow handled Klein tools are, and enjoy using them. I bought an older Klein & Sons Chicago electricians knife with the screwdriver listed above for under 10 on ebay, probably around 12 with shipping, which is fine, for effortless shopping. It is a great durable beater that I do not mind going ape with. I used it to cut drywall for a room partition I did. It is a gorilla beater if you need it to be. Strongly recommend it!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Northern Galilee Hills, Israel
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    Quote Originally Posted by knarfeng View Post
    Well of course you are right on all points.

    Funny thing is today the church asked me to do a small electrical fix-it. In taking out my tool belt I happened to notice that I still have an old Klein electrician's knife in my pouch. My boss gave it to me on my first day of electrical work in about 1978. He looked at what tools I had brought, then dug around in his used tool bin and added a couple. One of them was this knife, which was pretty old even then. We did home remodels and we used a hawkbill blade to open up the old style romex that was wrapped in fiber reinforced cardboard type insulation. I had brought a knife, but it wasn't a hawkbill.

    Now that I finished the job at church, Here are pics of my old Klein knife.
    (the brass sticking up is a liner lock for the screwdriver blade.)

    BTW, electricians (or at least this one) like electricians knives with a bale because even when you store it with the blade open, when it is in your pouch it is short compared to everything else and the bale lets you grab it more easily.

    As a union electrician in NYC we had to have an Electricians tool pouch.
    The knife was clipped on to the clip on the outside of the pouch.

    I still have the Colonial two blade knife.
    The supply houses in NYC only sold Colonial.

    The material here in Israel is different so I no longer used the knife for work.
    I used a plastic locking knife with the long disposable blades.


    I still have my Klien 9NE Linesman pliers from 1973.
    It still will cut 10 penny nails!

    It is too loose to use as my main plier, but I used it for rebar work when I was laying pipe before concrete pours.

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