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Thread: finishing a saddle stitch

  1. #1

    finishing a saddle stitch


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    I can sew free hand pretty good now except in my finishing knot. I make an UGLY timberhitch/waterknot that ends up exposed. How do you finish yours so it's neat looking.

  2. #2
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    I just back stich two or three stiches and cut it flush. If you are still not sure of it then when you cut it flush put a drop of Super Glue.

  3. #3
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    In addition to back stitching WadeH mentioned, there will be one thread that ends up on the outer face of the holster or sheath. I will take this one stitch further so that both threads end up on the back side of your project. Makes for a clean presentation. In my experience, two or three good backstitches and those threads are locked.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by R Lewis View Post
    In addition to back stitching WadeH mentioned, there will be one thread that ends up on the outer face of the holster or sheath. I will take this one stitch further so that both threads end up on the back side of your project. Makes for a clean presentation. In my experience, two or three good backstitches and those threads are locked.
    Yep I forgot to mention that.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by R Lewis View Post
    In addition to back stitching WadeH mentioned, there will be one thread that ends up on the outer face of the holster or sheath. I will take this one stitch further so that both threads end up on the back side of your project. Makes for a clean presentation. In my experience, two or three good backstitches and those threads are locked.
    So these 2 ends on the backside, you tie them off in a knot?

  6. #6
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    No just back stich a couple of time with both threads sticking out the back side of the sheath. Cut the threads of flush with the leather. They will not come undone. The wax holds it in place, but if you are worried then drop a drop of super glue on the end of the thread in the stich hole. That is the way I was taught and the Chuck Borrows does it too. There is no need to tie any knots.

  7. #7
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    Jpvjr, both these guys gave you the very best solution I know of. It works every time and besides they are both Texans so you can take what they say to the bank.

    Paul
    Instructional DVDs now available at http://chriscrawfordknives.com/ ***New third DVD is now available at the same web site***

    Paul Long------108 Briarwood Ln. W------Kerrville, TX---78028-9311----830 367 5536 pfl@cebridge.net

  8. #8
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    It seems like it would not work - but with the friction of being back stitched and the friction of being CRAMMED in that small hole - they wont move.

    Run your overstitcher over it and tap them down flush and you will have no issues.

    Remember, with today's contact cement - the stitching is darn near for looks. The glue is VERY strong - the stitching is gravy!

    TF

  9. #9
    What I do involves a little bit of extra work, but it makes for a really presentable sheath:
    I put a needle on each end of a long piece of heavy waxed nylon thread. I cut a short length of the same thread and tie it into a loop, and lay the loop around the very bottom predrilled hole in the sheath, between the layers, before I glue the pieces. I finish all of my stitching before the glue can set up, so it works great. I start stitching on one side of the sheath, and I work only one side at a time. Starting at the mouth of the sheath, I stitch through the top hole and split the difference in length from front to back. Each end, threaded on it's own needle, I sew through the next hole to the opposite side and pull tightly. Lather, rinse, repeat, all the way down to the very bottom, middle hole, where I stitch through from both sides. I then repeat the very same process down the other side of the sheath, also stitching THOSE two ends through the bottom center hole. Once that is done, and everything is pulled as tightly as I could, I grab the end of that loop I tied, and pull, and as I do so, it pulls all four ends of the two threads I used back through the holes and out, between the layers of leather. I am then able to pull those stitches tight, and reinforce it with a bit more glue, and once it dries, I just clip the ends off flush with the edge of the leather and you can't see it.


    Troy

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Talfuchre View Post

    Remember, with today's contact cement - the stitching is darn near for looks. The glue is VERY strong - the stitching is gravy!

    TF
    You should be careful saying such things...someone may come along and believe it....

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by rayban View Post
    You should be careful saying such things...someone may come along and believe it....
    I know Ray. I forget which sheath maker a read about on WSS that only used glue on one of his personal sheaths for a year and had no failures.

    TF

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by sheathmaker View Post
    Jpvjr, both these guys gave you the very best solution I know of. It works every time and besides they are both Texans so you can take what they say to the bank.

    Paul
    TEXAS? I'm from PA, what planet is Texas in?

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Talfuchre View Post
    It seems like it would not work - but with the friction of being back stitched and the friction of being CRAMMED in that small hole - they wont move.

    Run your overstitcher over it and tap them down flush and you will have no issues.

    Remember, with today's contact cement - the stitching is darn near for looks. The glue is VERY strong - the stitching is gravy!

    TF
    You know what, I never thought of using glue.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by jpvjr View Post
    You know what, I never thought of using glue.
    Seems like I never stitch anything anymore without gluing it first, best way to hold things together while stitching.

  15. #15
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    The stitches keep the leather from delaminating.
    Glue and stitches work together as a team.

    I back stitch as mentioned above, ending with both ends on the back (hopefully).
    Lacking an overstitch wheel I tap the stitches in place with a rubber mallet.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by jpvjr View Post
    TEXAS? I'm from PA, what planet is Texas in?
    Texas is actually right here on earth, but I can understand your confusion because Texas is as big as a planet.

    Paul
    Instructional DVDs now available at http://chriscrawfordknives.com/ ***New third DVD is now available at the same web site***

    Paul Long------108 Briarwood Ln. W------Kerrville, TX---78028-9311----830 367 5536 pfl@cebridge.net

  17. #17
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    Paul he is a prime example of the old saying, "There are 3 types of people in this world, those who are from Texas, those who wish they were from Texas, and those that just do not know any better.". Just kidding, well kind of anyway

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by WadeH View Post
    Paul he is a prime example of the old saying, "There are 3 types of people in this world, those who are from Texas, those who wish they were from Texas, and those that just do not know any better.". Just kidding, well kind of anyway
    oh yeah? well in PA we have our OWN native born foriegners (Amish). They make delicious and nutritious scrapple and shoofly pie.
    your foriegners (criminals) invented toxic fart foods no normal human can actually eat. like chili

  19. #19
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    You are probably right about the chili, but it sure is good. I was around some Amish several years ago and they made the best Ginger Snaps, man I could eat my weight in those.

  20. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by WadeH View Post
    You are probably right about the chili, but it sure is good. I was around some Amish several years ago and they made the best Ginger Snaps, man I could eat my weight in those.
    Here's something to try next time, elderberry pie, shoofly pie, and peanut butter pie for lunch. As dessert you can have peanut butter cookies.
    I like peanut butter.

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