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Thread: "Made in Sheffield" 1830-1930, A golden age ?

  1. #41
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    Hmm..Is there room in this thread for another pruner?

    Wostenholm....






  2. #42
    Wellington that is a fantastic Stag Pocket Knife! Here' another from my collection. Although It doesn't have a place of origin in the stampings it certainly must be of British Origin. It's stamped on all 3 blades HART & SONS FINE CUTLERY. Also deeply struck into the face of the master blade is CONGRESS KNIFE. I wonder how old it is?

  3. #43
    Todd, beautiful Pruner there! Lend me it next spring when the apple trees need attention...

    Mick, the Sportsman leaves me gobsmacked. The intricacy of the workmanship is humbling to our modern techno times, that stag must have been stalking some huge forest back in the 1850s but his spirit lives on and on.Beautiful.

  4. #44

    old sheffield

    wellington that nicholson sportsman master blade gives a decent look at crocus polish. my friend mark cruse inherited a ton of knives when his grand dad passed. he had a ton of old bruuckmans. [ last co. to do black [crocus] polish.one was a5 in. sportsman knife all crocus, even the twezzers & toothpick were crocus polished. guess whom bought that knife.

  5. #45
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    Thanks for the positive comments on the sportsman's guys.

    Todd, great to see your fine old Wosty pruner, nice size, obvious quality, cheers !

    1fartsmella, another Congress whittler !, not seen those markings before ?. There is a "Hart & Sons V (crown) R" listed in Goin's. Interesting example, thanks for showing.

    Dennis, your friend Mark was a lucky guy to inherit such a lot of good stuff, the 5" sports must have looked a picture.

    Here's another pruner T. Turner & Co, Cutlers To His Majesty (Sheffield England on rev)



    Mick

  6. #46
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    This is a real treat. Thanks for sharing those fantastic knives guys. This is another Thomas Turner to keep things going.



  7. #47
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    Hi s-k, great to see your 2 bld jack, thanks for showing.

    Here are a couple of pages taken from a 1902 Thos Turner & Co catalogue, I think my knife(shown above) is on one page, s-k's example on the other ? (not sure).


    Mick

  8. #48
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    Excellent catalogue excerpt Mick. Thanks very much for posting it. It does look like my knife on the very left of pg 144. My pruner blade is somewhat worn though. Cheers.

  9. #49
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    Amazing knife! (post 38)

  10. #50
    'Encore' indeed

    This thread only gets better. The 'bark' on that pruner looks like an ancient oak-tree Any dimensions Mick please?

    s-k the other side of your 2 blader is an interesting buttery colour, akin to grilled fat on a tasty lamb-chop!

  11. #51
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    Hi willgoy, pleased you like the pruner, it's only a tiddler though I'm afraid measuring 3 1/2" closed, it's the second knife from the top on pg 142 of the TT catalogue pg. Agree, really nice looking stag.

    Here's another ropey old knife made by the same firm T. Turner & Co, Sheffield 5" closed rope knife, iron pins, liners and bolsters, copper shackel, guessing 1880s-1900 in date, seen a hard life, the pin has been replaced and the blade been sharpened. Nice stag scales though.


    Mick

  12. #52
    Only 3.5" ??

    That's just right for pocket carry!

  13. #53
    Some fantastic knives posted in this thread.

    Thanks for starting this thread up Mick, as always, its a pleasure to take a peak at your collection. The Nicholson knife is absolutely stunning. Incredible craftmanship.

    Also very fond of the scratted bone handled JR pruner, what a lovely piece of decoration.

    Andy

  14. #54
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    Hi Andy

    Great to see you on board, thanks for the compliment on the Nicholson .

    Agree waynorth's scratted bone handled pruner is a beauty.

    Mick

  15. #55
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    Wellington, these pictures just keep getting better. Thanks for the thread.

  16. #56
    While we're on the subject of hawkbills here's one I've not seen another example of. It's stamped W.G. WHITING 6 MARKET ST. MANCHESTER Probably a retailer & possibly made in Sheffield. It has a folding Ivory budding blade and some nice Stag Handles. It's 4 1/4" closed.

  17. #57
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    Fartsmella, that is a nice one!

    And I thought S-K's pruner with a pen blade was unusual, first one I have seen. But that Thomas Turner catalog, in addition to several pruners with a pen blade, has a rase with a lambsfoot. Now that would be something to find at a flea market!
    Die Entropie der Welt strebt einem Maximum zu - R.J.E. Clausius

  18. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1fartsmella View Post
    It has a folding Ivory budding blade and some nice Stag Handles.
    Not into horticultural so I have no clue as to why the budding blade would be ivory and how its used? Fascinating stuff here. Hopefully someone could explain the proper use of the budding blade?

    Ken

  19. #59
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    When bud grafting you cut into a stem diagonally through the bark to the wood, and then insert a small bit of a stem with a bud on it, from the desired plant stock of the same species. the ivory budding blade is used to hold the diagonal cut open while you insert the grafting stem.
    an example is an apple tree which has had multiple varieties grafted onto it.
    roland

  20. #60
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    A very attractive pruning/grafting knife 1fartsmella . Almost certainly Sheffield made and sold by the Manchester retailer W G Whiting.

    Can't add anything more to Roland's excellent description of how the ivory blade was used.

    "Whiting W.G. Cutler, 6 Mrk St (Slater's Manchester...1911 Directory)"

    Mick
    Last edited by wellington; 12-19-2009 at 08:19 AM. Reason: Typo

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