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Thread: "Made in Sheffield" 1830-1930, A golden age ?

  1. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yaro5 View Post
    Nice Mick,
    Another fine example of the 19c cutlers craftmanship.
    Here is what I guess you'd call a baby jack knife. The knife is two inches closed with two blades a pen and quill. Both blades are stamped " Thomas Turner & Co Suffolk Works". Integral iron liners and bolsters. Looks to be pretty early c.1840-1850.

    Joe

    Hi Joe, that's an interesting small(ish) jack knife, early too, never seen that "Suffolk Works" marking on anything else..thanks for showing

    There's a picture of the late Victorian Suffolk Works on Mr Levine's "A visit to Sheffield in 1829" thread.

    http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/sh...47&postcount=5

    Mick

  2. #122
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    When a son of a Sheffield cutler reached the age of 21, it was a tradition that his father would make and give him a special knife, an apprentice piece, to be kept.

    I would like to show this knife.

    Marked "ENCORE" THOMAS TURNER & CO, SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND this all-metal sportsman's knife was made by the well known (great) cutler ERNEST MILLS, as his own apprentice piece, the 4" closed knife is engraved on the markside scale "EHM Oct 1918".

    On reaching the age of 18 Ernest was called up serve in the British Army (WW1), he decided to make this apprentice piece prior to being enlisted (the war actually ended 10 days before he was due to go to France).

    This knife was never used and was kept by Ernest throughout his life (d 1992). The knife is shown alongside an original W Mills & Son pattern book (Willis & Ernest, father & son, both left Thomas Turner & Co in 1922 and started up in business on their own)



    Mick
    Last edited by wellington; 12-28-2009 at 03:27 PM.

  3. #123
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    Amazing knives in this thread. That last one is quite a snapshot of history, Mick.

    Not mine but here's what the owner said:

    "The marking is "V(crown)R / R. Bunting / & Sons / Sheffield", about 6-5/8" closed, 12-1/8" open. My date estimate is c.1837-1840s."

    Lot of long stag here:


  4. #124
    Quote Originally Posted by wellington View Post
    When a son of a Sheffield cutler reached the age of 21, it was a tradition that his father would make and give him a special knife, an apprentice piece, to be kept.

    I would like to show this knife.

    Marked "ENCORE" THOMAS TURNER & CO, SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND this all-metal sportsman's knife was made by the well known (great) cutler ERNEST MILLS, as his own apprentice piece, the 4" closed knife is engraved on the markside scale "EHM Oct 1918".

    On reaching the age of 18 Ernest was called up serve in the British Army (WW1), he decided to make this apprentice piece prior to being enlisted (the war actually ended 10 days before he was due to go to France).

    This knife was never used and was kept by Ernest throughout his life (d 1992). The knife is shown alongside an original W Mills & Son pattern book (Willis & Ernest, father & son, both left Thomas Turner & Co in 1922 and started up in business on their own)



    Mick
    You are truly privileged to own this "One of a Kind" knife with fantastic provenance. This is "Museum Quality Stuff! Thanks for sharing, Barry

  5. #125
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    Thanks for the comments on the Mills piece, Mike and Barry

    Mike..I just about fell out of my chair when I first saw that Robert Bunting lockback dirk..an absolutely magnificent thing !!

    Robert Bunting and Sons were listed (Pigot & Co, Sheffield 1837) as fine spring, dirk, lock and sneck, and American hunting knife makers. (36 Regent St).

    Made my day..thanks again ..Mick

  6. #126
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    Mick, you've had the rest of us falling out of our chairs for days now. Glad you liked the dirk.

  7. #127
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    Mike, that dirk is incredible.

    Thanks for keeping this thread going Mick, every knife you post is an amazing piece of history.

  8. #128
    What a show.Thanks for sharing.

  9. #129
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    Mick - that pearl nautilus is stunning!
    Die Entropie der Welt strebt einem Maximum zu - R.J.E. Clausius

  10. #130
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    Here's a small sportsman's knife I've been intending to show for a while, marked FORD & MEDLEY, SHEFFIELD C 1890s-1900 ? 3 1/2" closed, ivory scales. The knife is pristine.





    Thanks for looking..Mick

  11. #131
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    That,is Perfect!
    Very nice indeed!
    Mick,Thanks!
    -Vince
    Please visit my website :
    http://www.vcmcustomknives.com

  12. #132
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    Mick, your knives have re-defined the word "mint" for me. i did not know that knives of 100 or more years ago, were that shiny and so perfectly finished, even when just completed by the cutlers.
    the ivory Ford & Medley above is simply beyond words. "Breathtaking" is as close as i can get, but still does not impart fully my astonishment.
    i'm quite sure that never in my life will i ever even have the opportunity to own a knife even close to what you are showing us.
    but, from the examples you have shown, my standards and expectations have risen considerably, and in time, my collection will benefit from this.
    my humble and sincere thanks for bringing us to the very door of the vintage Sheffield cutlers.
    roland

  13. #133
    Quote Originally Posted by rprocter View Post
    Mick, your knives have re-defined the word "mint" for me. i did not know that knives of 100 or more years ago, were that shiny and so perfectly finished, even when just completed by the cutlers.
    the ivory Ford & Medley above is simply beyond words. "Breathtaking" is as close as i can get, but still does not impart fully my astonishment.
    i'm quite sure that never in my life will i ever even have the opportunity to own a knife even close to what you are showing us.
    but, from the examples you have shown, my standards and expectations have risen considerably, and in time, my collection will benefit from this.
    my humble and sincere thanks for bringing us to the very door of the vintage Sheffield cutlers.
    roland
    Roland,

    As an ex-Sheffielder, I find your comments above to be most appropriate. The very skilled cutlers that made the knives that Mick is showing, were, in he main, grossly underpaid and underappreciated.

    The mere fact that they produced these items to a level of perfection that has never been equalled, all without the benefit of electrical power is a lesson to us all.

    The cutlers of today (Yes, every one of them!) would do well to consider what the wizards of the past achieved on a daily basis and for very little reward.

    I, for one, am VERY proud of them!

    Jim Taylor.

  14. #134
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    Here's one from the opposite end of the spectrum when compared to Mick's beauties.

    Not mine but here's a description: Large IXL congress (4-1/8" closed), "Congress Knife" on one sheepfoot and "Tobacco Blade" on the other. Pickbone handles, no England stamp (pre 1891), iron mounted.




  15. #135
    Anyone know why congress knives are deemed tobacco knives? What is the association with sheepsfoot and tobacco?

  16. #136
    Quote Originally Posted by navihawk View Post
    Anyone know why congress knives are deemed tobacco knives? What is the association with sheepsfoot and tobacco?
    The fellows down south used them to cut their plug chewing tobacco. Back in the day Case sold most of their congress knives south of the Ohio river and east of the Mississippi, tobacco country.

  17. #137
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    Roland, delighted you have enjoyed seeing the few knives, that I, and others have posted on this thread, some of which have been in "as made" condition, all the knives shown have been good quality, standard knives, the sort of thing commonly produced by the Sheffield firms of yesteryear.

    Jim, I wholeheartedly agree with your comments, It's amazing just what the old time cutlers, and all the other associated workers, produced, especially considering the working conditions of the time. I was reading an article only the other day that suggested working conditions in and around Sheffield fell dramatically from the 1830s onwards..12 hour days been replaced by 18 hrs, in many instances .

    Mike, another knife I especially like . it has a lot going for it..G Wostenholm..all original..age...size 4 1/8" !..twin sheepfoot blades..lovely curved pen blades, a great example. Thanks for showing.

    I think ? George Wostenholm is credited with being the first to produce the "Congress" pattern knife. He was always on the look out for a sales advantage "Congress" " Tobacco" markings would help sell. (Congress pattern knives have/or should have a sheepfoot masterblade)

    Mick
    Last edited by wellington; 12-29-2009 at 01:44 PM. Reason: Typo

  18. #138
    Mick, another couple of knives to die for. If I had to pick a knife that typified what this thread is about, I'd have to pick the Ford & Medley, an absolute corker!

    Mike, a great looking IXL Congress,a fine example from one of the great Sheffield Companies of that golden era.

    I am a keen collector of Wostenholm's and Rodger's knives of this period, here is a IXL six blade lobster. It has an unusual short rounded pipe reamer and all the blades have an exaggerated or square kick. The main blade is stamped "IXL George Wostenholm Sheffield England". It has milled liners which I think are nickel silver and the scan does not do the mop scales justice. I would guess the age to be 1900-1920.

    Joe




  19. #139
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    Very nice Yaro5. That pearl is in great shape and I know it's hard to find that pattern with the spring in the scissors still intact. I like your jack knife as well.

  20. #140
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Robuck View Post
    Very nice Yaro5. That pearl is in great shape and I know it's hard to find that pattern with the spring in the scissors still intact. I like your jack knife as well.
    The short pipe reamer is great,too,on that one
    -Vince
    Please visit my website :
    http://www.vcmcustomknives.com

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