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Thread: Goat Packing

  1. #21
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    Sep 2003
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    This is the pioneer of goat packing by the way:

    http://www.goatpacking.com/

  2. #22
    We saw some folks using goats in the Beartooths in MT a couple years ago. That's the one and only time I've ever seen it.
    B. Stark


    "I'm not sure I'm smart enough to work cold fusion... On the other hand I could shovel kittens into a furnace all day long." --Anonymous

  3. #23
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    Feb 2007
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    Fraser Lake, BC Canada
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    When I hear "goat packing" it reminds me of a few years ago packing this guy out 11km....



    I don't think using pack goats would go over to well here in BC for fear of transmitting disease to our wild sheep & goats - otherwise they would be awesome for hunting.

  4. #24
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    Mar 2002
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    VA
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    I read about it in Hobby Farms magazine. Would love to hear more first hand experiences.

  5. #25
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    Nov 2009
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    Sierra foothills
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    Hello Hollowdweller,

    Some good points you mentioned!

    Yes, my area is stock full of goat and sheep farms.

    I most recently worked out in Bodega, for an Artisan Goat Cheese Ranch, had 70+ goats.
    As well as helping out and purchasing goats from the large Redwood Hills Goat Cheese Ranch.


    There was an outbreak in the area of Q Fever the winter before this. This affects the mother's in birthing. Limits the production of fluids necessary to dilate during labor. Going through the birthing season was rough. Had to keep an eye and ear alert at all hours of the night.
    Too many mothers with babies half-sticking out in pain. Many deaths and aborted babies!
    A goat will have 2-3 babies, and the young, infected goats were having as many as the old mother's. Those lucky enough with 3 babies were more than happy to offer one up to a mother with an extra udder.



    So, to add, a healthy closed herd is a very good thing! Limits and helps to control what maladies or defects that can occur. And they can be numerous.


    Another thing worth mentioning is poison oak. They do eat it, stick and all, which is good! But they also like rubbing up against it. If you take them out, beware of getting it on you, or your belongings!





    As for taking them to a place like Yosemite, again, I personally would worry about enticing predators. Especially if without horns. Yosemite is a nice condensed area of wildlife. Mountain Lion country. Closest thing to my birthplace of Alaska that I've seen here in California in terms of wildlife diversity. Minus the moose and grizz of course....

    I'm moving up that way in the Sierra's for the year to manage a farm/ranch. Should be good in high country. Good air, good fishing and hunting too. The Yuba River is a plus!

    Getting soft here by the coast!

  6. #26
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    Nov 2007
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    yakima wa
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    Great idea. Goats are nimble capable mountain critters.

    You will need the means to keep them together at night. And a means to protect them from predators. Plus if times became desperate you have emergency rations with you.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by paleojoe View Post
    Hello Hollowdweller,

    Some good points you mentioned!

    Yes, my area is stock full of goat and sheep farms.

    I most recently worked out in Bodega, for an Artisan Goat Cheese Ranch, had 70+ goats.
    As well as helping out and purchasing goats from the large Redwood Hills Goat Cheese Ranch.

    Joe,

    I bought a buck last year from Steven Considine who works at Redwood Hills(shipped by air as a kid to WV) also have another doe who is an AI daughter of a Redwood Hills Buck but carried the herd name of the late Steven Shack (Companeros)

    I've never met Jennifer Bice in person but I met Steven Shack at the National Show in Harrisburg PA years ago. Sad he died too soon.

    Never had Q fever but I know it is zoonotic. Back in the days when people drunk a lot of raw milk pregnant women would unwittingly drink milk from Q fever goats and have abortions. Toxoplasmosis can do that too.

    PS my favorite Redwood Hills Cheese is the ripened Camillia(sp?) I had that at the ADGA Wine and Cheese Reception a few times also I really love Cypress Groves Humboldt Fog. I like it when it's really ripe and strong!

  8. #28
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    Sep 2003
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    PS on the subject of horns.

    I always remove them but I have heard the pack goat people say that they leave them on- not for protection but somehow they help the swiss breeds from becoming overheated.

    The Nubians of course being more heat tolerant.

  9. #29
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    Nov 2009
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    Sierra foothills
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    Interesting about the overheating Hollowdweller!



    And it seems it's a small goat world after all!


    Mmm...I like your taste! Cypress Grove is probably my favorite all around goat cheese maker right now.

    Vella makes awesome old-world style goat cheeses also. They make the best darn Jack out there too.

    Sorry, wandering OT! Must be getting hungry!

  10. #30
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    Sep 2003
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    appalachia
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    One last off topic.

    I made this one and been chowing down on it last few weeks


  11. #31
    Down here we just pack them on the bus.
    I'M KIDDING !

  12. #32
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    Nov 2009
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    Sierra foothills
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    Hollowdweller!

    Drool, Drool...


    My all time favorite is Pecorino. There's just something about dry cheeses!

  13. #33
    nice round hollowdweller!

    ive raised goats for meat and milk and used a couple for packing.

    add a little of african boer genetics to an alpine saanen and you get one strong goat.
    i had 2 that i could saddle up and ride the kiddos on.

    great animals, enjoy your project.

  14. #34
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    Mar 2007
    Location
    Revelstoke BC
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    580
    Great idea if you have the property and time commitment involved in keeping goats.
    Myself I head into the mountains with a dog carrying a pack.I make it carry its own food.
    These days more and more parks are limiting access to dogs,some parks do not allow any at all.Thats Ok because there is lots of places with trails or not where you can wander with them

    Shes at the far end of the tarn getting a drink

    A different trip with my brother and son

  15. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by edgemaster View Post
    nice round hollowdweller!

    ive raised goats for meat and milk and used a couple for packing.

    add a little of african boer genetics to an alpine saanen and you get one strong goat.
    i had 2 that i could saddle up and ride the kiddos on.

    great animals, enjoy your project.
    I've seen some monster Boer bucks

  16. #36
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    Dec 2008
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    Vancouver(Cloverdale)
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    I ran into a couple on a weeklong hike with a pack goat in the early 90`s, was a neutered male carrying about 45lbs. Really cool idea, my lab was carrying 25lb saddlebags but over half was his own food.
    It would be great to bring one and a dog to protect it and buddy up. 2 people would only have to carry 15 or 20lbs for one to two week`s and the dog could just carry it`s own food.
    I have damage to both knee`s and still hike but 20 years from now I know they will suck.
    Hopefully when we retire up north to the property I can play around with pack goats and an Alpaca.

    My great uncle had a goat that was inseparable from a springer spaniel. It was a kid and she adopted and mothered him. Was very cute.



    Hey dbors, my lab`s pack is the identical one, same colour too. Outward Hound brand I believe, good pack and it has a 3 buckle vest with lots of velcro. The pack is detatchable so it can come off for breaks or a quick swim without dealing with the harness and the horse like belly bloating my lab spot is known for.
    Last edited by Brad "the butcher"; 02-12-2010 at 03:33 PM.

  17. #37
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    Aug 2007
    Location
    san diego area
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    goats sound a little complicated to me.

    i think i will stick to dogs for now.

    vec

  18. #38
    my sister used to have some on her farm, not sure of the breed, but man they were as dumb as a box of rocks...

  19. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by remmmm View Post
    my sister used to have some on her farm, not sure of the breed, but man they were as dumb as a box of rocks...
    Weird. My family raises goats, so I've been around them all my life...they are some of the smartest animals I've ever managed. This makes them hard to handle sometimes (they escape from the most well-made pens) but I wouldn't say they were dumb.

  20. #40
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    Nov 2006
    Location
    indiana
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    361
    Have had goats most of my life, yes horns need to be left on to keep them cool, make sure the hooves are black, have never had trouble with a goat with black hooves, as long as they are kept trimed, have also had most common breeds, nubians, alpine, sanaan,lamacha,boer,pigmy,the hardiest would be kiko but not sure if thier temperment would be suitable.

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