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Thread: The first sharpening

  1. #61

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    While I've enjoyed this thread immensely, I think it is a perfect example of why I think a person who loves knives should know how to sharpen them. The OP mentioned that he spends 8-12 hours sharpening a knife. I imagine that if he charged for his services the cost would be a significant percentage of that Umnumzaan.

  2. #62
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    I learned how to make an maintain an edge when I was a meat cutter. I've enjoyed this thread. It's the tiny details that make all the difference, and I can tell you really know your stuff.

    Personally, I like to hold the blade still and move the stones. Most people do it the other way around. Having 8-12 hours to sharpen one knife at work would have been unimaginable lol but then we only had two stones and two steels, and the benefit of grinding wheels if the edge got bad. By the time I quit I was stoning my knife after about a week of deboning all day and just using steels. A new knife would last about six months.

    I haven't tried sharpening a pocket knife though, just kitchen type knives. Specifically Victorinox Fibrox and Wenger Swibo. I don't know what kind of steel they use, or how it compares to the kinds used in pocket knives. Am I going to find any little surprises?

  3. #63
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    The newer steels in pocket knives will take MUCH longer to sharpen than your kitchen knives, even longer if your sharpening tools are of a softer abrasive. The 8-12 hour thing is because of the steel and all the final polishing that is involved in getting a edge to that level. In total its about a 9-11 step process with 3-5 of that being the polishing, the first 6 is the stones. After that though touch-up only take minutes with a strop or finishing stone.
    The first sharpening
    The Burr
    How to make a strop


    For sharpening inquiries email me at: traditionalsharpening@gmail.com
    Free return shipping on orders over $50

  4. #64
    Quote Originally Posted by knifenut1013 View Post
    Hard to say because I only get to work on them in my free time, probably 8-12 hours.

    All freehand.



    14lbs of steel


    And a strop or two
    Would you be so kind to identify (bottom to top) each stone please? Some are easy to see others, not so easy?? Also are these the DMT 8 x 3's? I'm only finding 5 Dia-Sharp stones and it appears that you have 6 in your stack.

    What do you think of the 6" dual sided? Saves some cash but not as much room.

    A man can be handicapped by the wrong equipment.

  5. #65
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    Its the full set of 8x3 stones XXC-EEF, I had the 6x2 but they were too small.
    The first sharpening
    The Burr
    How to make a strop


    For sharpening inquiries email me at: traditionalsharpening@gmail.com
    Free return shipping on orders over $50

  6. #66
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    Reading about the DMT stones now, and they look interesting. I'm used to stones with deep dips in the middle because we had to share them at work and some people had very, very poor technique. That's why I move the stone, it was easier to correct for all of its angle changes. It would be pretty nice not to have to worry about that anymore.
    I wish I knew what grit our stones were for comparison. All I can say is one was grey and coarse (and I almost never needed it) and the other was orange/brown and finer, and they were water stones.

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShayM View Post
    Reading about the DMT stones now, and they look interesting. I'm used to stones with deep dips in the middle because we had to share them at work and some people had very, very poor technique. That's why I move the stone, it was easier to correct for all of its angle changes. It would be pretty nice not to have to worry about that anymore.
    I wish I knew what grit our stones were for comparison. All I can say is one was grey and coarse (and I almost never needed it) and the other was orange/brown and finer, and they were water stones.

    At best you were using a 600 grit stone, the diamond hones I use go to 8k
    The first sharpening
    The Burr
    How to make a strop


    For sharpening inquiries email me at: traditionalsharpening@gmail.com
    Free return shipping on orders over $50

  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by knifenut1013 View Post
    At best you were using a 600 grit stone, the diamond hones I use go to 8k
    Good to know. If 600 is all it takes to push cut through meat like it's not even there and slice off pieces of bone, then I don't feel a need to go much past that point, and don't have to buy as many stones.

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShayM View Post
    Good to know. If 600 is all it takes to push cut through meat like it's not even there and slice off pieces of bone, then I don't feel a need to go much past that point, and don't have to buy as many stones.

    Its just a guess, I would need to see the stone to make better judgement.



    Sharper is always better
    The first sharpening
    The Burr
    How to make a strop


    For sharpening inquiries email me at: traditionalsharpening@gmail.com
    Free return shipping on orders over $50

  10. #70
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    Sharper is better, but once you can hold up a piece of bacon by one end and cut it in half in midair without a sawing motion, that's not too bad.

  11. #71
    Quote Originally Posted by d.weglarz13 View Post
    So, then you do go both ways on the stone? up until now, i only have been using push strokes going foward, from choil to tip. And, one more question...i think i understand that you don't need to do anything other than use the stone to remove the burr? Like i said before, i have been trying to remove the burr on a piece of wood, but i think you said i should not do that. but, what is the right way? i mean, do you just use lighter pressure to refine the burr? and it should get smaller through grit reduction, right? there are so many different ways people use to sharpen and remove the burr, that it just gets confusing. Do i remove the burr, or don't I? Man, i really wish Knifenut would do a video...i mean, there are many that are good at sharpening, but i would really like to see how someone with such skill does it in motion? its hard for a guy to try to breakdown all the different opinions and ways that are out there, and what works the best, ya know?

    Just read this thread. Seems you need to make a trip into tribeca and go to korin. That guy that sharpens is pretty special. I believe he is is in Tuesday and sat. Just watching him will make you better.

    JC

  12. #72
    Quote Originally Posted by knifenut1013 View Post
    Its the full set of 8x3 stones XXC-EEF, I had the 6x2 but they were too small.
    I can't ever find the 8" xx-fine. Is it continuous or the mesh? Thanks - btw I live a bit South of Toledo and been to your State 100's of times. Nice country up there but not like on the shores of Lake Erie in the Walleye Capitol of the World.

  13. #73
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    I've purchased all my stones from knifecenter.

    Its not bad here but the weather is crazy sometimes.
    The first sharpening
    The Burr
    How to make a strop


    For sharpening inquiries email me at: traditionalsharpening@gmail.com
    Free return shipping on orders over $50

  14. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by knifenut1013 View Post
    The next pressure point or 3 is your thumb and remaining fingers, your thumb will support the back of the blade from dropping and steady your angle so the pressure from your index finger is the only real pressure you are applying. Your thumb and index finger almost create a twisting motion of pressure forcing the edge to stay in position on the sharpening surface.

    Thank you for this tip - I'm not the "knifenut" that you are, knifenut1013 - but I do sharpen freehand and last night I tried holding the knife as you've shown here - it felt awkward at first, but it didn't take long to realize that I had more, and better, control than my old way of holding the knife. Thanks for teaching this old dog a new trick!

  15. #75
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    I'm glad it has helped you.

    When you hold the knife like this you will find that the blade follows its own curve if you keep the choil pressure even and lift the handle at the correct rate of speed. The knife will seem as though its locked into its bevel on the stone and the only pressure you feel yourself applying is the forward and back pressure to move the edge across the stone. So in other words the pressure points you are making is forcing the edge to follow a near perfect angle and angle control on your part is minimal.
    The first sharpening
    The Burr
    How to make a strop


    For sharpening inquiries email me at: traditionalsharpening@gmail.com
    Free return shipping on orders over $50

  16. #76
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    Just noticed, Knifenut-you are left-handed?

  17. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by wongKI View Post
    Just noticed, Knifenut-you are left-handed?

    Yes, one of the gifted ones
    The first sharpening
    The Burr
    How to make a strop


    For sharpening inquiries email me at: traditionalsharpening@gmail.com
    Free return shipping on orders over $50

  18. #78
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    Like me

  19. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by knifenut1013 View Post
    The last and optional one and the one I don't have a pic for is placing your freehand on the blade. You can use a single point of contact like placing your index or middle finger in the belly and applying pressure when the handle starts to lift.... Or spreading you fingers across the blade to control bevel pressure where you want it. I use this method when using benchstones but its not really a option when you are holding both stone and blade.

    A LOT of freehand sharpening is about feel, its the feel of what you are doing that is more of a guide than anything.


    I hope I have done a decent job of explaining this as its not easy to put into words, please ask questions if not understood.

    (guess I just had to break it up)
    Do you do only stropping motion or "forth and back"?
    Thanks and amazing work!

  20. #80
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    I use a forward and back movement, only a back/stropping movement when stropping. I should have taken a picture on the stone but didn't think of it until I was too far along.
    The first sharpening
    The Burr
    How to make a strop


    For sharpening inquiries email me at: traditionalsharpening@gmail.com
    Free return shipping on orders over $50

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