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Thread: What are the best insoles to use while standing on concrete for long hours?

  1. #21
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    Another vote for Superfeet, solved my plantar faciitis and got me back on the job.

  2. #22
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    it can also help if you stand on something slightly(couple of inchs)higher on one side then switch to the other. it helped when i would pull 10hr shifts lifegaurding on the tile deck.

  3. #23
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    Cool

    I really appreciate your guy's help.
    My friend got a new pair of the walk fit insoles you see on tv.
    They come with a low, medium, and high insert.
    He never used them so he gave them to me today
    So I'm gonna give em a try.

  4. #24
    I learned a great trick when I was a teenager... Support socks for old people! You would be amazed as how much of a difference you will feel at the end of the day! You do need good shoes, and insoles make a big difference too, but add in a pair of support socks and you'll be in heaven!

    Stitchawl

  5. #25
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    The Dalles Oregon
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    I've done some long shifts (up to 20 plus hours some times) out on the boats. Which all have steel decks of course. But the longest day I ever worked was a 14 hour day at our shop, with concrete floors. I'll take steel over concrete any day of the week. If I were you I'd go ahead and buy a mat. A lot of our pipe welders have them for those days when they have to stand over a pipe vise and weld all day.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackknife View Post
    Spenco's.

    I worked as a machinist for 25 years, and I used Spenco foam inserts. Great padding as well as arch support.
    +1 on the Spenco idea. I pound concrete floors all day at work and the Spenco inserts really help.
    Two wrongs don't make a right, but three rights make a left.

  7. #27
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    Oct 2006
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    Get good supportive boots, dont skimp they will last years and that an important first step.

  8. #28
    I've done my share of standing or tile and concrete. I've used both Superfeet and Spenco and both are awesome. I personally prefer the Superfeet because it is a bit firmer, but if you want soft, I'd go Spenco, one thing I haven't seen mentioned is that you have to match the thickness of the replacement of the new insole to the one that came out of the shoe, so that it will still fit, if you get an insole too thick you may not be able to get you feet in the shoe. For most hiking/work boots the green superfeet will match.

    Someone has already said, don't skimp on the shoes, I like Red Wing and Vasque.

  9. #29
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    Research suggests that NO shoes benefit us most. Protective vibram layers for our soft feet is more than adequate. These are all the rage: http://www.rei.com/product/754675

  10. #30
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    ^My buddy has a pair of those things. He swears by em'. Looks kind of silly walking down the street, though.

  11. #31
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    I have never used expensive insole but I weigh #300+ and I work construction I have had wonderful luck with magnum desert side zips and matterhorn mach tactical boots and I managed to get them at a good price .

  12. #32

    sole footbeds

    As far as shoes or insoles, you want support for standing around vs. something cushy for walking around. I recommend sole footbeds.

    http://www.yoursole.com/products/foo...ture/viesturs/

    The blue ones seem to be the best for me. Stick them in the oven for a couple of minutes and then put them in your shoes and stand in them until they cool. It's the cheapest custom orthotic I have found and they worked pretty well for me. Lasted half a year with me walking around in them quite a bit, then I stuck them in the oven again and got another 6 months out of them (they get flat).

  13. #33
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    A good industrial rubber mat as mentioned. My knee's and lower back would ache on the line without one.
    I use the superfeet insoles and they are really good.

  14. #34
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    Nike sneakers are extremely comfortable. If you can find an outlet store, try some on. I haven't tried many of the options that others have mentioned though.

  15. #35
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    Get a mat.
    I've worked in a few woodshops and the ones with plywood over concrete are noticeably more user friendly than just concrete. I always have a mat to stand on, it's even better on plywood floors.
    Running or cross training shoes seem to do me pretty good when I have lots of stand up work to do.
    Lots of cushion in high impact shoes.
    Hiking shoes are okay (I'm a lifelong hiker) but I find that running shoes and cross trainers seem to do me the best.
    Many swear by superfeet. Mine only caused me grief - this is unusual. I tried 'em for about 3 months and put at least 300 miles on 'em and they only caused me grief. My feet have problems, though.
    Old injuries.

  16. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frostyfingers View Post
    When I worked in a warehouse, I was told that it helps to alternate your shoes. Wear one pair one day, and another the next. I don't know why it helps, but it does.
    This is often repeated by many people. Your feet sweat so, letting your shoes fully dry lets them recover. We're not talking about noticeably wet here either. This also helps if you fight anything moisture related on your feet.

    You will notice a difference with really dry shoes. I saw the light with breathable "sneakers" when I started putting on clean dry socks during the lunch hour.

    Good thick work socks also make a big difference over the standard Wally-word tube socks most folks wear.

  17. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeepin View Post
    I just found out they do have rubber mats to stand on.
    And on the shoe thing I can wear sneakers, workboots, whatever.

    I will go look into those suggestions.
    Thanks very much for the help
    Congrats on a new job in this economy!

    What will you be doing?

    I found Timberland work boots work very well. Their insoles need to be replaced every few months but, for walking on concrete these things are tops. I looked at Red Wing and everything else and I'm glad I went with Timberland (half the cost of Red Wings ).

    The boots I have are specifically OSHA crush compliant (not "steel toe" but, some sort of high impact polymer stuff), electrical rated, and puncture resistant (Canadian standard test) with 8" tops. These offer very good protection and are very comfortable. On-line I see them running ~$100 and ~$135 locally at the safety shoe place.
    Last edited by Sid Post; 05-29-2010 at 03:34 AM. Reason: typo

  18. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iboschi View Post
    Research suggests that NO shoes benefit us most. Protective vibram layers for our soft feet is more than adequate. These are all the rage: http://www.rei.com/product/754675
    I'd be interested to see that research. My doctor told me I developed PF because I spent too much time barefoot after my daughter was born, and needed to support my arches.

    One caveat; I am overweight and put on an additional 20+ lbs during the same period.

  19. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by stjames View Post
    I'd be interested to see that research. My doctor told me I developed PF because I spent too much time barefoot after my daughter was born, and needed to support my arches.

    One caveat; I am overweight and put on an additional 20+ lbs during the same period.
    It's not mainstream but it's getting there. Googling "barefoot running" will help find a lot of info (not just running, but shoes in general).

    Here's a story:
    http://nymag.com/health/features/46213/

    To the person who mentioned switching shoes every other day, the article above mentions that.

  20. #40
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    West Australia
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeepin View Post
    I might be starting a new job soon that will require me standing on concrete pretty much stationary for many hours a day.
    I need help desperately to find some really good insoles that will help.
    I can't afford the $200.00 plus custom fit insoles right now.
    Hopefully down the road.

    Thanks in advance.
    Hey do you have a fella? Hey aint he a lucky guy.
    but as one who spent a lot of hours standing/concrete etc but a few pairs of insoles to rotate them put inside quality footwear. So many womens "shoes" are anything but and give no support.
    At the end of the shift put your shoes where they can get the sun into them of where they can air out. I had a Podiatrist advise me to use a few pair of working shoes to give the shoes and your feet a change.

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