Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 23

Thread: Best stones to surround a fire pit?

  1. #1

    Best stones to surround a fire pit?


    ADVERTISEMENT
    Hey guys. I'm clearing out a small area on my property for a place to have fires for when friends come over. I don't need to dig and actual fire pit. I just want to mark the area with a circle of stones and lay down a layer of sand so that the fire will be less apt to spread or escape. I've tried bricks and concrete blocks and both just fall apart in short order. Was wondering what's the best type of stones to surround a fire pit with. I'd like them to be heavy and roundish is possible. Thanks.
    "If you can't take a little bloody nose maybe you ought to go back home and crawl under your bed. It's not safe out here. It's wondrous, with treasures to satiate desires both subtle and gross, but it's not for the timid."

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 1998
    Location
    Louisville, Kentucky
    Posts
    12,230
    Blog Entries
    1
    River Rock. Most landscaping centers will have it in big wire barrels.
    Kevin Jon Schlossberg | Owner, BladeForums.com (Deal with it, reddit)
    Site FAQ | How to get your Username changed

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Location
    vegas
    Posts
    1,646
    used brake drum from a semi truck. you can probably score one free from the scrap metal dumpster at a local truck dealer that does a bunch of service work.


    do NOT use rocks "fresh" from the river... they need time to dry out or things can happen!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Southeast Idaho
    Posts
    32,975
    I second Fixer's suggestion for property you own. Old semi split rims work well too. Also I second his caution about some types of stones. Some absorb and trap water inside and become steam powered grenades when heated. I've even had this happen with rocks that had not been in a stream in years, just exposed to the weather.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    4,229
    I fussed around with rock surrounds but settled on a section of culvert. This one has been in use for ten years.



    Jeff
    Proud Supporter of JK Knives

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    michigan
    Posts
    1,670
    I would also say go for a section of culvert or a large rim also some washer/ dryer tubs can be used they even come in stainless .You can put rocks around it then I have heard of problems with just rocks and steam.

  7. #7
    To piggy back on what thebrain contributed; be careful with any rocks from streams or rivers that are saturated with moisture. Upon reaching the ideal temp these rocks can and will explode sending jagged shards and rock splinters everywhere.

    Don't ask me how I know.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Southeast Idaho
    Posts
    32,975
    A good local stonemason who does fireplaces can direct you to the right stone if you have your heart set on that. They know their rock, and where to find it. Might even have a large enough pile left over from a job to fill your needs.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Signal Mountain
    Posts
    12,602
    Cool, I'm glad this post popped up. I just built my daughter's swingset/fort thing out back and now I have to relocate my fire pit. I was just going to clear more area and then move the mountain stone pit. This has given me cause to pause and think if I want to use the same stones I've used for the last decade or so or...if I want to take a different approach and do something completely new.
    History is a gallery of pictures in which there are few originals and many copies. ~Alexis de Tocqueville


    B.H. #27

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    yonkers
    Posts
    500
    Quote Originally Posted by jds1 View Post
    I fussed around with rock surrounds but settled on a section of culvert. This one has been in use for ten years.



    Jeff
    sweet set up,too bad they don't allow that in my coop apts.

  11. #11
    I'll try to do pics tonight,but the truck wheel idea is great. I found mine in a scrap yard. The big bonus is that the top is flat , so grates ( old wire fridge shelves make great grates) fit on top , perfect for roasting stuff. I surrounded mine with small stones so the grass doesn't catch fire. I even made a cover for it when I'm not using it ,so it stays dry ,ready for the next fire.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Auburn, AL
    Posts
    77
    An old 55-gallon drum will work if you are somewhat skilled with a recip saw...

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Dogpatch
    Posts
    46,348
    In an area of Lime and Sand stone and seeing first hand, stones exploding by a campfire, I like the looks of stone but I have been using Cinder Blocks for years now. I can go to the block plant and get blocks for free from their dump. They are whole blocks that are seconds or defects. My pit I built which has lasted years is roughly 4 X 8 with one end open to feed in the large stuff.
    The best part is what blocks that do fail, I can recycle and reuse them by working the pieces into my road base.

    Only if I could Find a REAL, Becker Necker at these prices.
    Last edited by 555; 08-18-2010 at 12:20 PM. Reason: add word Find
    Allen Saunders: Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans.

  14. #14
    Thanks guys. Lots of good ideas here. I didn't know rocks would explode. I know concrete will though LOL.
    "If you can't take a little bloody nose maybe you ought to go back home and crawl under your bed. It's not safe out here. It's wondrous, with treasures to satiate desires both subtle and gross, but it's not for the timid."

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Katy, TX
    Posts
    6,961
    Let me throw out one last thing.

    Rocks and fire rings are nearly worthless when stopping the spread of fire. It is rising and traveling sparks that do the most damage in fire spreading. So - use rocks if you want (dry ones like said above) - but just know that they are simply demarcating the spot to have fire - as opposed to providing protection. Clear the ground - be sure you have no underground roots or peat that can catch fire and light it up.

    TF

  16. #16
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    West of the river!
    Posts
    12,601
    Blog Entries
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by 555 View Post
    In an area of Lime and Sand stone and seeing first hand, stones exploding by a campfire, I like the looks of stone but I have been using Cinder Blocks for years now. I can go to the block plant and get blocks for free from their dump. They are whole blocks that are seconds or defects. My pit I built which has lasted years is roughly 4 X 8 with one end open to feed in the large stuff.
    The best part is what blocks that do fail, I can recycle and reuse them by working the pieces into my road base.

    Only if I could Find a REAL, Becker Necker at these prices.
    Yeah, but I'm guessing that failed REAL, Becker Neckers that get worked into your road base will cause you problems. Better just to pay the going rate and then have a REAL, Original Becker Necker with a thing on the end of the Handle that opens all sorts of bottles and that is of really good quality so it won't Fail.

    The money is in the boxcars, right?
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Gurewitch in "Charlie Sheen vs. Ron Burgundy"
    I am a werewolf stampede. I will stomp on your infant minds with my righteous fuzzy toes.
    Quote Originally Posted by Esav Benyamin View Post
    Computers always need more memory.
    Bags always need more capacity.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Dogpatch
    Posts
    46,348
    Quote Originally Posted by bulgron View Post
    Yeah, but I'm guessing that failed REAL, Becker Neckers that get worked into your road base will cause you problems. Better just to pay the going rate and then have a REAL, Original Becker Necker with a thing on the end of the Handle that opens all sorts of bottles and that is of really good quality so it won't Fail.

    The money is in the boxcars, right?
    On the other hand, if I could find enough (you'll ship to me) FREE REAL, Original Becker Neckers with a thing on the end of the Handle that opens all sorts of bottles.
    I could Weld them together to make a Fire Ring and they already have air holes in them to boot. It's a win, win.

    (555: Waiting by the roadside, for the UPS Truck. )
    Allen Saunders: Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    4,229
    Quote Originally Posted by siskaholic View Post
    sweet set up,too bad they don't allow that in my coop apts.
    Thanks. I spend a LOT of time back there. Sitting in front of a fire for a few hours is like taking a short vacation.



    Jeff
    Proud Supporter of JK Knives

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Central Brazil
    Posts
    2,338
    I've seen rocks explode twice in campfires. The first time was as a kid and we didn't know any better. The rock was taken from a stream side and it blew up like a freakin' grenade, scattered the fire everywhere. The second was high on a hill and there was no reason to think it would have retained that much water. Mac

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Chicago Area
    Posts
    4,812
    Quote Originally Posted by Talfuchre View Post
    Rocks and fire rings are nearly worthless when stopping the spread of fire. It is rising and traveling sparks that do the most damage in fire spreading.
    And make sure there are no overhead branches. Generally, a fire is three times taller than the flames you see. In other words, if you have three-foot-high flames, the fire is capable of starting branches on fire only nine-feet above you. And that of course assumes you don't have still-burning material rising up on the heat. Folks who burn paper and leaves (and you can do this, don't worry) must realize that rising embers can catch on tree branches quite a distance up above your fire. If you're doing this (and I repeat you can), make sure your firepit is in a clearing where nothing overhead (or as Talfuchre says, nothing below!) will catch fire.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •