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Thread: Golok or Parang?

  1. #1
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    Golok or Parang?


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    I grew using machetes, but never used such models as the Golok or Parang. Which of these beauties would be better suited for general outdoor use? I'm thinking camp area preparation, chopping, batoning, brush clearing, and maybe as a draw knife. I like the lines of the Parang better, but I think the Golok may be a better choice for chopping/batoning. Has anyone here used both and can clarify this for me?

  2. #2
    All I can really tell you Preacher Man is either is very similar as the terms are very general. Edge profiles blade geometry better suited to wood, woody plants-- Just because one manufacturer calls his blade a parang and another golok does not mean their chosen design/shape is what makes it one or the other. (I'm not saying one would be exactly like the other either. Knife or Kniv. could be same or similar tools; different cultures)So perhaps you have some specific models in mind.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Preacher Man View Post
    I grew using machetes, but never used such models as the Golok or Parang. Which of these beauties would be better suited for general outdoor use? I'm thinking camp area preparation, chopping, batoning, brush clearing, and maybe as a draw knife. I like the lines of the Parang better, but I think the Golok may be a better choice for chopping/batoning. Has anyone here used both and can clarify this for me?
    The lines often get a little blurred between the two. Most of the goloks I've seen are typically thicker and shorter, although that isn't always the case. I've also seen more goloks with sheep's foot or almost straight up-curve...basically not much of a point. Parangs I've seen are more often thinner and longer, but again, not always the case and I've often seen more with a distinct point and they are often longer in blade length.

    These are all called goloks and you can see a lot of variations:



    I don't have any pictures of parangs, but Condor's and even Valiant's both show a heavier blade (1/4") with a significant weight-forward balance and pretty long. I've seen some more along the lines of a machete for lighter vegetation.

    The thicker and more weight-forward designs would be better choppers for hard woods...of course they can be a little taxing on using like a regular machete. I think the designs of the golok would make it a more robust blade to baton if needed.

    I would make the assumption that names are just that and actual designs and use are regionally more definitive.

    ROCK6

  4. #4
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    Oops. Maybe I should have clarified that I'm looking at Condor's Golok and Parang specifically.

  5. #5
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    I say go with the Golok. I got to use both last weekend, and Golok seemed better suited for camp work. The Parang is a BEAST. Its thick, and chops real well, so does the Golok, but the Parang is weighted way forward. That Golok sits in the hand well, and the shorter length makes it a little more wieldy(sp?).

    Go with the Golok, you won't be disappointed.

    Moose
    After this, I'm gonna need a Percocet the size of a Hardee's biscuit......-Unknown Millwright

  6. #6
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    I don't have the Parang, but I really like the Golok. I'd take that over the Parang as it was easier to wield than the Parang. Seems like it would make a fine camp blade.

  7. #7
    go with the Golok

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    Both?...just saying....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Preacher Man View Post
    I grew using machetes, but never used such models as the Golok or Parang. Which of these beauties would be better suited for general outdoor use? I'm thinking camp area preparation, chopping, batoning, brush clearing, and maybe as a draw knife. I like the lines of the Parang better, but I think the Golok may be a better choice for chopping/batoning. Has anyone here used both and can clarify this for me?
    I prefer a pointier barong myself, but that's my personal preference.
    History is a gallery of pictures in which there are few originals and many copies. ~Alexis de Tocqueville


    B.H. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by mistwalker View Post
    I prefer a pointier barong myself, but that's my personal preference.


    you don't count as you happen to be one of the lucky few with a FB machete in the 12 inch version, lucky sob

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    Quote Originally Posted by grunt soldier View Post
    you don't count as you happen to be one of the lucky few with a FB machete in the 12 inch version, lucky sob
    Hey...I didn't go there....

    Lol, that was hilarious
    History is a gallery of pictures in which there are few originals and many copies. ~Alexis de Tocqueville


    B.H. #27

  12. #12
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    Thank you for the advise guys. The consensus seems to be for the Golok for a camp knife.

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    Though I don't have a golok, I own a parang and I think the golok would be the better choice. Don't get me wrong, I love my parang but the golok looks like it's better suited for camp tasks outside of hacking brush with a really neat machete. In fact, I'm ordering one for myself for x-mas to take on my spring camping trip.

  14. #14
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    Again, thank you everyone for the advice. I'm going with the Golok. But now I'm curious. What is the Parang better suited for?

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    From the design it looks like the parang would be an absolute beast at clearing small saplings (<2" diameter) or bamboo, anything that you want to cut through with a single swing. It probably is better than the golok for lighter grasses, but the condor eco-survivor would be cheaper and better than either for that task.

  16. #16
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    agreed, these terms are somewhat fuzzy regarding the actual blade shape you get. considering your uses and what condor calls golok and parang, i'd go with the golok unless you're cutting through sugar cane or something. they're both for chopping/clearing, but parang to me is more of a wider pancake-type blade, see the FOX parang for a classic (if somewhat short) parang shape.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Preacher Man View Post
    Again, thank you everyone for the advice. I'm going with the Golok. But now I'm curious. What is the Parang better suited for?
    I know there are more knowledgeable people on this forum and some from the regions where specific designs originated are commonly used, but here are a few of the different designs and uses...I took this from Machete Specialist's website. They are a great resource for machetes and have some good info:

    Barong Machete: These machetes are known for their thick, leaf-shaped blade, which is usually only sharpened on one side. The traditional weapon of certain tribes in the Philippines, the barong was feared by European colonizers for its ability to cut through rifle barrels. T

    his weapon is used in the forms of martial arts known as Kali, Eskrima, or Silat, all of which originate from the Philippines.

    Alternative Names: Barung, moro barong

    Golok Machete (includes the Parang): Goloks tend to have a thicker blade than most other machetes, and have a prominent primary grind that prevents the blade from lodging in green wood.

    Good for cutting thick, green vegetation without lodging in the material.

    Alternative Names: Golok Kembar, Golok Mala, Pedang Batak, Klewang,Talibon, Gununting, Pinuti, Burmese Dha, Golok Bengkulu, Sable

    Bolo Machete: Popular in SE Asia. The distinctive bulge adds heft to the fore-blade for additional chopping power.

    Cane Machete: Cane machetes are heavy, blunt-tipped machetes perfect for hacking corn stalks and sugar cane. Often the blade is hooked to allow the user to pull the chopped cane from the plants still standing. The thin blade allows for easy cutting through cane style vegetation.

    Typically used for cutting sugar cane, rice, and corn stalks. Cleaver variety great for butchering and chopping thick vegetation.

    Alternative Names: Beaver Tail, Cleaver, Corn knife, Cuta, Garab, Machete de suelo, Tunca, Parang Bandol

    Sax Machete: Ancient European blade with a straight edge. The machete of medieval northern europe. Differs from other machetes by having a flat cutting surface which reduces slipping or slicing when cutting.

    Panga Machete: Machete design popular in Africa and the Caribbean. Deep belly provides weight for chopping and curvature for slicing. The upturned point can concentrate force on a small area for piercing.

    chopping moderately thick woody vegetation.

    Alternative Names: burriquito, cutlass machete, daga, liniero, rozador, tapanga.

    Bill Hook Machete: Ancient agricultural implement with a curved blade for chopping around curved objects like tree trunks. Traditionally used for snedding, which is the process of stripping side shoots and buds from a branch. The hooked blade, sharpened on the inner curve, is ideally suited for gripping and cutting vines and brambles. Also used for hedge construction and maintenance, and by charcoal makers for use in coppicing and woodlot management.

    Alternative Names: Bagging Hook, Bill Hook, Billhook, Coa, Reaping Hook, Sheaf hook, Trimming Hook.
    I thought it was interesting that they included parangs with the goloks in the machete category. I think Mistwalker is correct in that the generalized use is pretty similar; however the length is the biggest distinction where the golok is more often shorter and handier for varied applications.

    It's also interesting that they categorize what we often refer to as a "standard" machete as the Bush Machete. Regardless, it's a good collection of information and I like the definitions and typical uses for the different designs. Large chopper (machetes, khukuri, etc) designs have always intrigued me as to their development, uses and specific regions where they originated.

    All said and done, I think you'll be quite pleased with Condor's Golok model as a camp chopper/tool.

    ROCK6

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by mistwalker View Post
    Hey...I didn't go there....

    Lol, that was hilarious


    ohhh and now you laugh at us poor sob's who don't have one. well i'll be

    just messing man, i can't wait for him to get some cranked out. i want a 12 and probably a 14, and maybe a 18,

  19. #19
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    How about the mini golok or mini parang?
    oh wait crap, Joe Shhhh.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joezilla View Post
    How about the mini golok or mini parang?
    oh wait crap, Joe Shhhh.
    OOOOOOOOOOOO!!!! I'm tellin'!!!!!

    Wait, its you I'd have to tell. Can't go tellin' on you to you, that would just be ridiculous.

    Moose
    After this, I'm gonna need a Percocet the size of a Hardee's biscuit......-Unknown Millwright

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