Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Sheath for a TL-29

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    AZ
    Posts
    123

    Sheath for a TL-29


    ADVERTISEMENT
    Does anyone out there know if there is a sheath for a Camillus TL-29 Electricians knife. I found some new nylon sheaths that might fit but I would prefer leather.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Southeast Idaho
    Posts
    32,983
    Some TL-29s originally were supplied to the military in leather sheaths. It was a dual sheath which held a pair of pliars in the rear portion with the knife in a pocket sewn to the front. You can occasionally still find these sheaths on the auction site.

    http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedi...ers-and-sheath

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    AZ
    Posts
    123
    Thanks Codger. I had the pliers, knife and sheath when I was in the service but had to turn them in when I left the communications branch. And I actually climbed telephone poles when they were still wood. I better be careful, I'm dating myself.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Syracuse, NY
    Posts
    152
    Quote Originally Posted by zonaman View Post
    Does anyone out there know if there is a sheath for a Camillus TL-29 Electricians knife. I found some new nylon sheaths that might fit but I would prefer leather.
    As far as I know, the only sheaths produced specifically for the electrician's knife were the sheaths mentioned by Codger. I have found the 4" basket-weave stamped sheath fit the knife nicely. I have a few and would be happy to send you one. PM me if you are interested.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Southeast Idaho
    Posts
    32,983
    My own TL-29 sheath is different from the one in the link I provided. It is more open-fronted with individual keeper straps for each utinsil. I'll see if I can locate a picture of the type.

    Meanwhile, here is a post from Military Knife expert Frank Trzaska:

    Quote Originally Posted by trz View Post
    Hello Codger_64,
    Excellent piece on the wonderful electricians knife. I would like to update you on a few items in the military section of your piece.
    The TL-29 is Tool, Lineman, Item 29 not the date. The first TL-29 designation was dated 5/1/19 as Issue A
    The kit you refer to in the TE33 was first issued in canvas, then leather and later in canvas duck webbing. Initially the TL-29 was issued with the TL-13 pliers. The pliers had a wire stripping function added to the cutters behind the jaws and became the TL-13A edition.
    Yes, they are still a standard item in many versions of different tool kits for the government. The reason they were issued in boxes was for uses by other services and in different size kits. An electrician on a ship in the Navy would not need the TE-33 belt kit.
    I know that Klein Tools marketed two knives they called electricians knives as early as 1904. The two bladed version used the locking system of depressing the main blade to unlock the screwdriver blade. The Cattaraugus liner locking patent, 825,093 was issued in July 3, 1906 so it prevented any other company from using it. Of course if the government wanted knives built with the patent they could have them and not infringe on the patent. All others would have to wait until 1923 when the patent expired to use that device so all early electrician knives use the alternative locking system. I don’t know if that locking device was ever patented? The Klein Tools version of the knife was made by Empire Knife Co.
    In 1929 the military tested a larger version on the TL-29 called the TL-116. If was the size we know today, prior to this the TL-29 was a much smaller knife. The Signal Corps knife was prone to breakage when being used as a screwdriver if a very tight screw was encountered. The torsional force applied would pop out the pins at the blade pivot end and the knife would spread apart. To fix this a larger pin and load bearing surface was required so the knife was enlarged. This knife in the testing (Made by Schrade) used the older locking system of the typical Signal Corps knife not the liner lock. It was not adopted, one of the reasons was when gripping the knife hard for a tight screw the user would unknowingly depress the main blade and unlock the screwdriver allowing it to fold on the operators fingers. A better locking system was required. The next year, 1930 the liner locking system was added and adopted as the new TL-29 Issue B. For some unknown reason they reverted to the old designation of TL-29 but without a revision number like an A1 or A2 as such. It remained and still does through all it’s revisions the TL-29.
    All versions required a lock in the military specifications as was the bail a part of the specs for the military. I have found these knives with wood, bone and plastic handles all with TL-29 markings of some type. The requirement for the marked shield was dropped on 8/5/42 with the TL-29 being impressed into the wood directly. All the various specifications were rewritten into one dated 5/25/1945 falling under Army Signal Corps Specification 71-569, it was now standardized. During the changeover from military to government wide specifications it was redrawn on 5/5/1954 and standardized as the MIL-K-13419 (SigC). At that change among other things they required the impressed TL-29 should be filled with a permanent white filler and varnished on top. This helps to date post war models as being filled with some color, white or gold. The knife companies (mainly Albert Baer) tried to eliminate the TL-29 along with the Engineers 4 blade, the Navy and AAF flyers 3 blade, the Mountain Troops 5 blade, the Quartermaster Stockman 3 blade and every other type of knife in the military standards. He reasoned with the government they could up production making only one knife pattern. He told them they should standardize on one design, the all steel MIL-K818 that he was producing in the Kingston name at the time for the Marine Corps. At the monthly meeting of the Pocket Knife Industry Advisory Board meetings it was a topic of concern for every member. The Army performed two tests on the all metal knife but the Signal Corps shot it down for the simple lack of a locking screwdriver. Most of the other knives were eliminated at that point for the remainder of WWII but the TL-29 continued in production and still does to this day.
    I enjoy your writings and hope to see much more of it.

    All the best
    Frank Trzaska
    Last edited by Codger_64; 01-09-2011 at 01:27 PM.

  6. #6
    I have one of the dual sheaths - I will have to dig it out of the toolbox and take a look at it.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •