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Thread: Best Outdoor/Survival knife

  1. #21

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    I found this knife recommended by The Woodmaster

    It is a Becker made Hoodlum Knife

    sorry do not know how to add picture so i will add link

    http://images.knifecenter.com/knifec...U0060BKSBH.jpg

    Specifications

    * Blade: 10.0" (25.5 cm), survival straight clip, 5160 steel with a powder coat finish for corrosion resistance
    * Thickness: 0.220"
    * Length: 15 1/2" (39.4 cm) overall
    * Weight: 14.6 oz. (414.0 g), 22.0 oz. (624 g) carry weight
    * Handle: Removable Black Linen Micarta® handle scales
    * Sheath: Heavy-duty nylon, M.O.L.L.E. compatible with leg strap cord and front storage carry pouch
    * Features: Handle SMS system, large forward finger choil, blade groove, hammer and lanyard hole
    * Pro Level
    * Made in USA


    That knife has 10'blade and 414 g.

    If i will go into outdoors i think i will need a smaller blade like ESEE-6 for most activities.

    If i will take this knife, I might as well take a Axe or a machete.

    Any opinions on this?

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    Ontario, Canada
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    Saintalex,

    That is a very long debate. You will get some folks like TheGame and WilliamM who prefer large blades for the activities they do. Whether an axe or machete does better than a chopper-sized knife has a lot to do with what is being chopped and where. I'm for example told that in certain desert scrub environments the combination of thorns on branches and very dense wood makes a thick chopper knife the preferred tool. Others seem to prefer a machete. Where I have compared machete and chopper knife performance in my preferred environment the machete seems to win and the axe trumps them all.

    Since we don't know where you are from, what environment you hike in and what kinds of things you do while you are in the outdoors it is impossible for us to recommend a good knife to meet your needs. I encourage to read some of the earlier threads on chopper knives, mid-sized knives and bushcrafter knives. Use these terms as keywords in your search. You will find interesting debates and conflicting opinions for each category of blade length.

    Personally, I like the ESEE-6 quite a bit. But like I said earlier, when I bring the ESEE-6 it spends most of its time attached to my pack and I have a 3.5" Bruce Culberson knife that does the majority of fine blade work. In fact, most people here will recommend a combination of tools rather than a single edged tool. It is always the best configuration for versatility and efficiency of outdoor tasks with the only compromise being weight and packing volume.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Vancouver Island
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    12,056
    How about this one from TOPS Knives...

    http://www.topsknives.com/product_in...roducts_id=136

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    NW Oregon, USA
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    6,935
    Quote Originally Posted by kgd View Post
    Welcome to our little Outdoors nook and thanks to Esav for directing you to the right place.

    I will say that you are coming in with a very narrow mindset as to what size of knife you want. In fact, if you gage the outdoor community here about the most versatile knife size for outdoor use, the majority of folks will tell you that between 3.75 - 5" blade length is optimal.

    Now, there are folks who prefer mid-sized knives in the category that you state, but more commonly, the folks that do so also carry a small knife which is used in the majority of cutting chores. Small companion knives might be a folding knife like a SAK or other folder or a 3-3.5" fixed blade. The bigger knife is used for camp chores, wood splitting and food prep.

    When you say you want a knife that can take a lot of abuse, this sounds exactly like something an ad-copy would say advertising a knife. The question is, why do you want to abuse your knife? I certainly have my disagreements with my 'survival minded' brethren who like to dream up all kinds of weird fantasy scenarios about how they could use their knives. I even fell into that mindset for a while. But after really using knives in the outdoors, I came to more realistic conclusions about how I use my knives, what tasks are best suited to my type of camping and environment. Worrying about knife breakage is something people get obsessive about for little reason. I've done all the outdoor things I've needed to do, including the dreaded act of batoning thick wood, with 0.1" thick old hickory kitchen knives and have really come to terms with the fact that knife breakage is a rare thing to have happen. Worrying about knife breakage is counterproductive and leads people into choosing knives that aren't really well suited to their actual use patterns.

    I have also found that there was a long journey in finding what I now consider the best knives for me. What I realize now, is that nobody could have told me what my preferred knives are today would be back then. I probably wouldn't have listened, had my own preconceptions or I just wouldn't understand how to translate my style of using a knife in my environment from all the divergent, often conflicting but rarely completely wrong advise that is out there. I had to learn through experimenting with different blade lengths, different blade styles, handle configurations all the while increasing my outdoor skills as I went along. It was actually a fun journey. I also found out that what works best in one environment, isn't necessarily the best in another environment. In short, there is no such thing as a perfect knife. There are good knives and well respected knives that many people like, but nothing considered a universal for all conditions, styles or environments.

    In fact, focussing on the knife is totally the wrong tact and is more likely to lead you astray. Focus on developing your skills. Visit W&SS regularly and test out the kinds of activities and things people are doing and talking about. Use the knife that you have and then figure out what its deficiencies are, what you think might be the best improvements and when you are ready invest in another blade go for an upgrade. Just make sure that your upgrade js based on your learned experiences of what you want in the next knife. Not on others opinions. Of three you selected, I would suggest the buck119, only because it is the cheapest and through nostalgia, that is the very blade that set me onto the path that got me to where I am today. Its a great, robust knife and not as wide as the BK-7.

    I'd also invite you to visit the W&SS forum and check out the bushcrafter knife challenge thread. Not only will you get some great eye candy of fantastic knives for outdoor applications, but you get a good idea through the selected tests designed by the reviewers of what to look for in a great outdoor blade.

    Again, welcome, stick around here and share your learning experience with our community!
    Good post. I started out with a Swamp Rat M6 and a kabar. Through use I've learned the best knife for me is 2 1/2-3 inch blade by 1/8 inch(or less) thick paired with a hatchet/hawk.

  5. #25
    Long knife or short knife. If you plan on batoning or chopping, go with a longer blade, at least 6". A long knife can do whatever a short knife can do and more.

    More free advice. If you pay $300 for a knife will you use it like one that cost you $20. Most will not. So if you are going to display your knife, buy the $300 knife, however that does not mean it is any better than a much cheaper knife, unless it is a Busse.

    For the best $10 you ever spent and one of the toughest knives around today, go to CheaperThanDirt and look at their DBA-445. Read the reviews and go to Knifetests and see the torture test. You need to know how to put an edge, because this knife does not come razor sharp.

    A second option is the Cold Steel Bushman. Look at this video and check out the ones from Kinfetests. You should be able to get this one for $35
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IlSP_...layer_embedded

    Moving up in price to $99 and in toughness, if that is possible, is the Scrap Yard Scrapper 6. What a knife. Want a short one. look at the Dumpster Mutt.

    Want to spend more for very little, then look at the Fallkniven A1 at ~$200 a price that you could buy 20 of the DBA-445.

  6. #26
    I have also found that I really like the combination of a small, relatively skinny (compared to the beefy blades out there nowadays) blade + a hatchet (or in some environs, I would take a machete instead). I need to give my swamp rat more work (still haven't had a chance to use it much), but so far I have tended towards my $14 mora. That being said, I think of a "survival" knife as one that should be built to survive abuse, and for that reason, you will find me carrying the swamp rat.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
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    2,137
    The more I learn about knives and the outdoors in general, the more I feel like anything over four inches is unnecesssary weight.

    I started out with a Recon Scout - great for splitting wood and tough as nails too but I could easily get away with a folding saw and a 4-4.5" blade like a Bravo1 by Bark River or one of their bushcraft knives, like the Aurora. And this is exactly what I do now. I'm even considering down sizing to the Woodland Special which is only 3"!

    +1 on any Fallkniven if you need stainless too. You will not be disappointed with any of the F1, S1 or A1 knives.

    Now you can also get Bark River knives more and more in CPM 3V, some of the toughest steel money can buy. INFI is purportedly tougher but you pay a premium because only one maker produces it, Busse Combat. 3V is super tough though!

    Or if you have your heart set on BIG and TOUGH, get a Scrapyard Dogfather. You can find ones new and unused on this very forum.

  8. #28
    300 on the dot will get you a fehrman, fehrmans are some damn tough knives:

    http://store.fehrmanknives.com/shadowscout.aspx

    You might be able to find a used fehrman fora a bit less.

    Tops makes some great knives, i personally like their alaskan harpoon design.

  9. #29
    I got a question.

    Did anyone ever used a serrated knife?

    is it useful for trap making and outdoors?

    If anyone used a particular good serrated knife please tell me which one.

    thx!

  10. #30
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Esav Benyamin View Post
    I am moving this to our Outdoor Gear, Survival Equipment & More forum.

    The Buck 119 is a classic which has served many outdoorsmen well for many years.
    The Dark Ops knife is a mall ninja fantasy blade.
    Any Becker is a great choice for outdoors.

    We also have Buck and Becker forums here where you can discuss their knives at more length.
    Also check out the ESEE knives.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
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    NH
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    2,590
    Welcome.
    I like Becker knives, they are good hard use knives.
    I've never seen the need for a saw back.( folding pocket saw works good)
    Good luck.

  12. #32
    I live in a temperate North Carolina environment and prefer as a fixed blade knife something in the 3 1/2 inch to 5 inch range. I really haven't found a need for a bigger knife. Sure I have an HI Ang Khola and other large choppers that can go through stuff, but outside of a camp environment, especially when I want to be moving around it is too heavy for my taste. In my opinion you be better off with a shorter blade and a folding saw or axe. I tend to like my Kershaw folding saw for such purposes for cutting wood or a SAK.

    As such I would recommend...

    ESEE 3 or 4
    Fallkniven F1
    Becker BK 7
    Chris Reeve Mountaineer I

    I tend to go with the Fallkniven F1 nowadays.

  13. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by Limeyfellow View Post
    I live in a temperate North Carolina environment and prefer as a fixed blade knife something in the 3 1/2 inch to 5 inch range. I really haven't found a need for a bigger knife. Sure I have an HI Ang Khola and other large choppers that can go through stuff, but outside of a camp environment, especially when I want to be moving around it is too heavy for my taste. In my opinion you be better off with a shorter blade and a folding saw or axe. I tend to like my Kershaw folding saw for such purposes for cutting wood or a SAK.

    As such I would recommend...

    ESEE 3 or 4
    Fallkniven F1
    Becker BK 7
    Chris Reeve Mountaineer I

    I tend to go with the Fallkniven F1 nowadays.
    i understand. those are good knifes.

    but for example you will lose your saw. then you will need a serrated knife.
    so one tool can also perform another tools task.

    So anyone used a good serrated knife? is it worth it?
    If yes then what brands?

  14. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by saintalex View Post
    i understand. those are good knifes.

    but for example you will lose your saw. then you will need a serrated knife.
    so one tool can also perform another tools task.

    So anyone used a good serrated knife? is it worth it?
    If yes then what brands?
    I tend to avoid serrated knives on a survival knife. They are much harder to sharpen in the field, especially if you are without a sharpening rod. A straight edge has many ways to be sharpen in the field which I believe makes it a better choice. It also works better for carving, skinning, making traps and so on, but that is just my opinion.

    I never really had problems cutting through saplings and taking out enough wood so I can break even a decent size branch. I took out a small tree that was 4 inches thick with my Kershaw Leek straight edge just a few weeks ago.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pikeville, Kentucky, United States
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    If you want it now & don't want to wait...go for either the ESEE6 or Ka-Bar/Becker BK9 but if you can wait & want a really nice knife look at some of the custom makers on here. Stomper & Mark Wohlwend make some serious knives & they look great to !
    Plus you will have money left to purchase other gear(pack,firesteel,folding saw...etc)you can get a nice folder (Vict. Swiss Army knife- Hiker or Farmer) & a small backup blade (Condor knife&tool basic bushcrafter or nessie) ! Stay away from the "SawBack knives" & I think Plain edge is alot more useful than a combo edge (just my .02) !

  16. #36
    i settled on the knife. ESEE-6 and an small axe (did not decide which one yet) if anyone has any idea please tell me

    i know i need also multitool or a SAK. Problem is the multitool that i want to get is military and does not have scissors.

    the one i want to get is "Leatherman 850022 MUT Military Multi Tool with Sheath" it is said that it can be used to clean guns and adjust them, but i think it is only for M16,M4 and etc.

    does anyone know if it is actually useful for cleaning other guns?

    Any advice?

  17. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by saintalex View Post
    i settled on the knife. ESEE-6 and an small axe (did not decide which one yet) if anyone has any idea please tell me

    i know i need also multitool or a SAK. Problem is the multitool that i want to get is military and does not have scissors.

    the one i want to get is "Leatherman 850022 MUT Military Multi Tool with Sheath" it is said that it can be used to clean guns and adjust them, but i think it is only for M16,M4 and etc.

    does anyone know if it is actually useful for cleaning other guns?

    Any advice?
    Urgg. Unfamiliar with that particular SAK.

    As to the axe, I much prefer the Gransfors Brux axes. Excellent quality and ergos. I believe they're made in SC ... easily found through google.

    Or, you could just go to the requisite sub-forum here and look for a custom makers. I've had excellent success with quite a few makers here on BF.

  18. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by Shotgun View Post
    Good post. I started out with a Swamp Rat M6 and a kabar. Through use I've learned the best knife for me is 2 1/2-3 inch blade by 1/8 inch(or less) thick paired with a hatchet/hawk.
    Quote Originally Posted by kgd View Post
    Welcome to our little Outdoors nook and thanks to Esav for directing you to the right place.

    I will say that you are coming in with a very narrow mindset as to what size of knife you want. In fact, if you gage the outdoor community here about the most versatile knife size for outdoor use, the majority of folks will tell you that between 3.75 - 5" blade length is optimal.
    Quote Originally Posted by HandofCod View Post
    The more I learn about knives and the outdoors in general, the more I feel like anything over four inches is unnecesssary weight.

    I'm even considering down sizing to the Woodland Special which is only 3"!
    don't think this is simply coincidence; carving, food prep, fish/fowl/game cleaning and most wood prep can easily be accomplished w/ a quality "smaller" knife and often better than a "larger" knife

    a "smaller" knife is simply lighter and easier to carry, yet more than up to the tasks one finds himself in a survival scenario

    the largest knife I own is a Fallkniven F1 and I don't feel handicapped w/ it (or my smaller knives for that matter)

    there clearly is a niche for a larger knife, but in my own personal experience that niche is relatively narrow

    of course like most things in life ymmv

  19. #39
    well if i can not use that leatherman for other guns then not worth buying it.

    I think a multitool is better then a SAK, because it has more functions.

    if i could i would take 20 knifes with me, but you need to take what is useful the most.

    Leatherman Military BLACK SURGE MOLLE sheath 830278.

    I remember Ron was talking about a multitool in his videos, the one that locks accessories of multitool. so the blade or screwdriver does not move. I do not remember which one it was. If anyone can tell me.

    Any advice on multitool?

  20. #40
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    So, you decided on the ESEE 6 and a small axe, along with a multi-tool? As far as axes, I, personally am waiting to see how the new Condors do, as they will be a less expensive alternative to GB, or Wetterlings. As for the multi-tool, take a look at some of the Victorinox multi-tools, or the SOGs. I believe a few of the SOGS lock, the one I am thinking is the Powerlock, but some others may as well.

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