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Thread: Puukko?

  1. #1

    Puukko?


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    I first heard of this knife on a Russian TRPG game but never seen or heard of them anywhere in America. I got it from a guy in Finland who showed pics of his in a knive thread and offered to sell me a few. Anyone heard of them?









    The blade appears to be similar to a Mora but has a longer tang, the handle is kinda crude though...

  2. #2
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    There's a bunch of those knives in the shop class in my school. They're decent.

  3. #3
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    The Finman puukko is made by finnish company Laurin Metalli Oy (Lauri's Metal, www.laurinmetalli.fi).
    It's a Mora-like puukko with stainless steel blade that has a more acute grind (puukko grind) compared to Moras. The hardness should be at about 57 - 58 HRc. It is an excellent cheap allaround knife. I have two for work around the house. The handle is quite neutral in shape, various grips are easy.

    The sheath is nothing super but does give you carry options by positioning the clip down or up. It's possible to rig it as a necker but personally I wouldn't trust the retention of the sheath if the handle is facing down. But overall...If you like Moras you should like this one aswell

    I do recommend them to any cheap scandi fans.
    Last edited by PatriotDan; 08-26-2011 at 10:56 AM.

  4. #4
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    PatriotDan, you sure know your Finnish knives.

  5. #5
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    Puukko is a name now used to describe a type of knife used in several Scandinavian countries including Finland, Norway and Sweden. Because of its range the Puukko comes in a wide variety of handle materials and some variation of blade shape. Having been to Finland I picked up a wooden handled version made by Marttiini. Still seen as an essential piece of kit in northern parts of these countries, you could go into any supermarket and buy a cheap plastic handled version by the same company.

    With a Scandi grind it is a popular choice amongst bushcrafters over here in the UK.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puukko

    As always you can spend as little or as much as you wish! Here are a few companies worth a look. Roselli, Helle, Marttiini, Kellam and Brisa.

    Hope this helps!

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    (the reply was probably not relevant to the original question. I removed it to clarify the thread.)
    Last edited by PatriotDan; 08-28-2011 at 11:11 PM. Reason: added some info.

  7. #7
    Thanks for explaning that.

  8. #8
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    Ragweed Forge has some great info on puukkos. A member here gave me some knife books, and one of those was a history of knives of Finland. Lots of information, and pictures! Puukkos are addictive.

  9. #9
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    Someone else (a Finn, obviously -- sorry, I forget who) posted this on puukkos some time back:

    ‘Puukko’ is a Finnish term. It’s a derivative of ‘puu’ which means wood. A puukko is, first and foremost, a wood carving tool (we have a special term for that, ‘vuoleminen’, the root verb being ‘vuolla’, which comes close to whittling or wood carving, but denotes specifically the use of the blade for push-cuts, not slicing or slashing). Other ‘necessary’ uses of a puukko have to do with fishing and hunting, i.e., scaling, skinning, filleting, and other such tasks in preparing fish and game. Skilled users do about everything with a puukko, though. Once it was thought that a boy really doesn’t need other purchased toys; after he gets a puukko, he’ll make everything else with it. This is no joke! In the 50’s, schoolboys were (at some places) forbidden to use the puukko during wood-carving lessons, because they wouldn’t otherwise learn to use other tools, like planes, saws and chisels. Now the situation is, of course, quite different. Many Finns do not learn to use the puukko properly, though some kind of renaissance may be discernable here (there’s even a special ‘vuolukirja’, whittling book, by Joel Nokelainen 1996, but I think, only in Finnish).

    The puukko has developed to remarkable functional simplicity during generations of hard, straightforward use by ordinary people. It is a compromise, a multi-tool, if you like, with nothing inessential. That explains some of its characteristic features. The blade, for instance, is typically only a hand width in length, or a bit less. A longer blade would hamper its performance in whittling, etc. control is better with a shorter one (for fine work, such as countersinking a hole, the puukko is grasped by the blade and the thumb may be used as a ‘backstop’). But because it is not a ‘pure’ wood carving tool, too short won’t do. Similar explanations could be given for the relatively pointy point (remember the hole?), the (usually) straight back (with absolutely no false-edge or swedge), the wedgelike grind, the relatively thin blade, the smooth guardless handle (often called the head), made traditionally of wood, mostly birch, or of birch bark, etc. There are, of course, exceptions, and specialization is taking place here, too. But most of the recent developments in puukko may be more market-driven than purely function. For instance, the recent proliferation of finger-guards comes solely from legislative (consumer protective) demands of USA. A traditional puukko does not need them, as it is not meant for stabbing (though they were used for that too by the ‘puukkojunkkarit’, a group of Finnish outlaws at the Kauhava region quite a few decades ago).

    The carry system, in Finnish ‘tuppi’, is traditionally great. It’s not a quick-draw or concealment item or anything like that, but protects the puukko (and its owner) well, keeps it securely in place, does not hamper sitting, etc., and is aesthetically pleasing (the puukko is often called ‘tuppiroska’, sheath-litter, as it were and that could, I guess, reflect the high esteem that traditional makers have had for the sheath). But everyone does not know anymore how to make a proper tuppi (or does not have the time/financial means for that). About the grind. Not every puukko has a high saber grind (or ‘wide flat Scandinavian grind’, as somebody said), and not every puukko lacks a secondary bevel, though typically they do. Sharpening the whole flat sides every time would wear the blade down quickly (this actually happens – there are many puukkos around that resemble only faintly what they were as new), though for ‘vuoleminen’ you do need a very acute angle (about 15/30 degrees). In addition, there are (new) puukkos with a secondary grind as well as some with a convex grind (notably, the Lapinleuku, the traditional tool of reindeer-owners). About the thickness, yes, puukko blades tend to be relatively thin (and not very wide, either, and they do not have a full tang, which I have often grumbled myself). This relates again to its primary functions. It’s not convenient to ‘vuolla’ or to fillet with a thick blade, and you do not, typically, chop or pry with a puukko (for chopping we use the axe and for prying the other guy’s tools).

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    (the reply was probably not relevant to the original question. I removed it to clarify the thread.)
    Last edited by PatriotDan; 08-28-2011 at 11:11 PM.

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    (the reply was probably not relevant to the original question. I removed it to clarify the thread.)
    Last edited by PatriotDan; 08-28-2011 at 11:11 PM.

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    (the reply was probably not relevant to the original question. I removed it to clarify the thread.)
    Last edited by PatriotDan; 08-28-2011 at 11:11 PM.

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    (the reply was probably not relevant to the original question. I removed it to clarify the thread.)
    Last edited by PatriotDan; 08-28-2011 at 11:11 PM.

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