Page 3 of 61 FirstFirst 12345671353 ... LastLast
Results 41 to 60 of 1204

Thread: Who else uses a scythe?

  1. #41

    ADVERTISEMENT
    Here we go--pics as promised. The setup varies from piece to piece, but on mine you can see the typical ring bolt used to affix the blade to the snath. The hafting angle can be adjusted quickly by loosening the bolt and moving the lug of the tang into the other slot in the face place, or further adjustment can be made by loosening the lower bolt and moving the face plate, which is held in place by interlocking teeth on the base plate, underneath.

    Photo on 2011-09-22 at 15.11.jpgPhoto on 2011-09-22 at 15.11 #3.jpgPhoto on 2011-09-22 at 15.11 #4.jpg


    Baryonyx Knife Co. ~Condors, Moras, Deluxe Tramontinas, and More!

    "To live at all is miracle enough."
    — Mervyn Peake

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Hog Lot
    Posts
    5,685
    Oh man - those bring back some memories. I used one to hedge under apple trees during the summer to earn extra money - They didn't have weed wackers then or I would have been using one for sure.

    I'll take a Stihl FS250 anyday of the week
    What's Next?

  3. #43
    Good technique goes a LONG way with them. Until you "get it" then performance is sub-par at best. Much like straight-razor shaving, it's not for everyone!


    Baryonyx Knife Co. ~Condors, Moras, Deluxe Tramontinas, and More!

    "To live at all is miracle enough."
    — Mervyn Peake

  4. #44
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Nova Scotia
    Posts
    105
    I just started using a scythe to serve my mowing needs this summer. Once I got the technique down, I found it yet another one of the olde ways that slow ya down and put you in the moment, and on top of that, with my hilly yard, it's actually more physically efficient and saver than using a gas powered lawn mower.

    Early in my research before buying my first scythe, I found this entertaining YouTube video that describes a mowing race between a "strapping lad" with a gas powered weed trimmer and a "barefoot maiden" with a scythe in which the latter easily won.

    There's also an article on my website called Musings of an Apprentice Mower that includes another video containing Nova Scotia Hand Mowing Champion Perry Veinot (pronounced "VEE no") who is over 90. Be warned that if you have no experience with the south shore Nova Scotian accent, you WILL need an interpreter.

    Let's never forget, scythe matters.

  5. #45
    I've watched that video of Mr. Veinot about a hundred times and it never gets old. He makes it look like the grass is already cut and he's just sweeping it out of his way.


    Baryonyx Knife Co. ~Condors, Moras, Deluxe Tramontinas, and More!

    "To live at all is miracle enough."
    — Mervyn Peake

  6. #46
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Nova Scotia
    Posts
    105
    Quote Originally Posted by FortyTwoBlades View Post
    I've watched that video of Mr. Veinot about a hundred times and it never gets old. He makes it look like the grass is already cut and he's just sweeping it out of his way.
    I only started scything at the tender young age of 54, and I will forever stand in awe of such men as Mr. Veinot! He can call me "kid" at any time.

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Colorado Springs, CO
    Posts
    592
    Mr. Veinot reminds me of my great grandfather with a scythe in his hands. Although Mr. Veinot does not have a southern accent. lol. Great skill is in the practice.

    Howard

  8. #48
    It's an old man's sport--all about patience, not overreaching yourself, and caring for yourself and your equipment. All hard lessons to learn, so maybe that's why so many old timers tried to have their kids/grand kids do it to teach them some valuable life skills while clearing the back 40.


    Baryonyx Knife Co. ~Condors, Moras, Deluxe Tramontinas, and More!

    "To live at all is miracle enough."
    — Mervyn Peake

  9. #49
    Hi 42. I recently recieved from my grandfather via an aunt an Al handled scythe. Now I know what to properly call the snath! Anyway he also had a railroad pick and other cool tools, some like the scyth were not new when he used them but now are getting up there in age. I think it is a seymour but the paper lable is mostly worn off and I cant be sure.I can make out "..tools since 1872..." or the like and "..american made...". I willtry to google them if they are still in buisness.
    The blade is attached just as your pictures and is definately high carbon judging by the rust. Dont know what condition its in but I'll clean it this winter and well see. Mostly got light use if the rest of his stuff is any indication and although I would like to check it out I wont likely give up my power tools to maintain my emense 1/4 acre spread. A side note, I really like the blue svords at your site-now on my short list thanks. Cool thread.Rodney

  10. #50
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Nova Scotia
    Posts
    105
    Quote Originally Posted by FortyTwoBlades View Post
    It's an old man's sport--all about patience, not overreaching yourself, and caring for yourself and your equipment. All hard lessons to learn, so maybe that's why so many old timers tried to have their kids/grand kids do it to teach them some valuable life skills while clearing the back 40.
    I will, without reservation, drink to THAT - but only after the mowing's done. That blade is SHARP!

  11. #51
    Quote Originally Posted by sharpguytoo View Post
    Hi 42. I recently recieved from my grandfather via an aunt an Al handled scythe. Now I know what to properly call the snath! Anyway he also had a railroad pick and other cool tools, some like the scyth were not new when he used them but now are getting up there in age. I think it is a seymour but the paper lable is mostly worn off and I cant be sure.I can make out "..tools since 1872..." or the like and "..american made...". I willtry to google them if they are still in buisness.
    The blade is attached just as your pictures and is definately high carbon judging by the rust. Dont know what condition its in but I'll clean it this winter and well see. Mostly got light use if the rest of his stuff is any indication and although I would like to check it out I wont likely give up my power tools to maintain my emense 1/4 acre spread. A side note, I really like the blue svords at your site-now on my short list thanks. Cool thread.Rodney
    Yup! Sounds like a Seymour. Make sure you pay good attention to that video Whynacht posted, and read the article I posted to get an idea for the technique. You'll be bumbling around with it for a while as you learn how to set it up for your dimensions (with the scythe standing on its head the lower nib should be at hip socket level, the distance between the lower and upper nibs should be the length from your elbow to your fingertips) and figure the rhythm and technique out, but you'll "get it" probably after a couple of hours to a couple of days. And keep it sharp!

    I'll likely get some of the Seymour scythes in the web store at some point here. They're too fun not to share.

    Quote Originally Posted by Whynacht View Post
    I will, without reservation, drink to THAT - but only after the mowing's done. That blade is SHARP!
    Bwahaha I can't even begin to imagine scything while tipsy! That's a recipe for disaster if ever I knew one.


    Baryonyx Knife Co. ~Condors, Moras, Deluxe Tramontinas, and More!

    "To live at all is miracle enough."
    — Mervyn Peake

  12. #52
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    2,259
    Yep, plenty of hours cleaning up around fence lines aorund the farm. Stray strands of wire will ding the edge I do not go for the stoop over and sweep technique. Too old for that

    I inherited mine from my grandfather, building and topping hayricks, he said it was time I had my own tools

    Bill

  13. #53
    Yeah--stooping and sweeping may take out a wide swath, but it's poor form and will kill your back! It's doing that that ends up causing so many people to complain about the American pattern. Work smarter--not harder! Properly adjusting the snath to your build lets you stay nearly upright, though not quite so erect as the European pattern. Let the tool do all the work and just guide it where you want it to go. Swish...swish...swish...


    Baryonyx Knife Co. ~Condors, Moras, Deluxe Tramontinas, and More!

    "To live at all is miracle enough."
    — Mervyn Peake

  14. #54
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Pacific NorthWet, USA
    Posts
    2,635
    A free .pdf of "The Scythe Book" by David Tresemer can be downloaded here:
    http://www.fastonline.org/CD3WD_40/JF/417/06-273.pdf

    This is a previous edition without the addendum by Peter Vido.
    The updated material can be found at Peter's website
    http://www.scytheconnection.com/adp/techn1.html

    Note: the focus of this material is on the European scythe.

  15. #55
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Pacific NorthWet, USA
    Posts
    2,635
    For the American scythe, various methods for attaching the blade to the snath can be found using Google Patents.

    http://www.google.com/patents?id=xPp...page&q&f=false
    http://www.google.com/patents?id=UdF...page&q&f=false
    http://www.google.com/patents?id=b4Z...page&q&f=false
    http://www.google.com/patents?id=f2E...page&q&f=false

    These are a few of the many results from using the search terms "scythe attach".

  16. #56
    Thanks to all for the links and to 42 blades for the initial set points form the "handles".

  17. #57
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    2,259
    Hard to explain but I just kind of shifted my weight from right to left feet. Blade went out when right foot was down and came across as I shifted to left foot. After a little bit, it was just natural and could maintain it for quite awhile, just rocking side to side and a half step forward.
    Bill

  18. #58
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,970
    Does this count, or is this a sickle?

    Axes4Life

  19. #59
    As wonderful a resource as "The Scythe Book" is for folk wanting to learn the use of the European scythe, David Tressemer can be credited with doing tremendous detriment to the culture of American scythe fanciers. His confusion with the design and use of the American scythe (and the fact that his book is given away free by most retailers with the purchase of an European scythe) has done much to dissuade folk from taking the time to learn the right technique as when they do an online search for a resource, they inevitably come across either his work, or comments from people who have taken his word as gospel.


    Baryonyx Knife Co. ~Condors, Moras, Deluxe Tramontinas, and More!

    "To live at all is miracle enough."
    — Mervyn Peake

  20. #60
    Quote Originally Posted by Operator1975 View Post
    Does this count, or is this a sickle?

    That's what's known as a "scythe-bladed sickle"

    Edit: or more properly, a "grass hook, scythe type."
    Last edited by FortyTwoBlades; 07-04-2013 at 02:11 PM.


    Baryonyx Knife Co. ~Condors, Moras, Deluxe Tramontinas, and More!

    "To live at all is miracle enough."
    — Mervyn Peake

Page 3 of 61 FirstFirst 12345671353 ... LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •