Page 6 of 23 FirstFirst ... 234567891016 ... LastLast
Results 101 to 120 of 460

Thread: Crosscut Saw Thread

  1. #101
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Pawht-land, Maine
    Posts
    1,043

    Support BladeForums!
    Paid memberships don't see ads!
    Quote Originally Posted by Square_peg View Post
    Just curious, are you wrenching or peening the set? I've heard that wrenching is easier but peening makes the saw cut better. Any truth to that in your experience?
    I hammer set. I used to set with a plunger type set, but that was back when I was a total saw filing boob. I'm sure you could make it work, but hammer setting is easier I think. I cant speak to the difference in performance but my saws cut pretty good.

  2. #102
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    SW Michigan
    Posts
    1,391
    Here is my first crosscut and my first attempt to recondition a saw. No manufacture etch, 36 inches, champion tooth, flat ground. Before:


    The rakers are filed, I'll try sweging later. I made a guage, and used a hammer as an anvil, and a geologist's hammer to set the teeth:


    Took it for a spin last week on some well seasoned black cherry:


    Even though I have never used a crosscut before, I think it should do better. Think I'll try it in some other types of wood before I do anything to it though. Thanks for looking.
    Last edited by rjdankert; 06-17-2012 at 05:16 PM.

  3. #103
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Pawht-land, Maine
    Posts
    1,043
    When I filed a nice 4' disston champion tooth for hardwood I told the guy to cut the wood as green as he could get it. Unless you have surgical precision in filing saws just don't cut very well in seasoned hardwood. That Cherry is pretty hard. Try it out in some green wood, maybe even something softer like Popler or Alder or something. What measurements for the set and raker depth did you use?

  4. #104
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    mountains of montana
    Posts
    1,946
    Quote Originally Posted by rjdankert View Post
    Here is my first crosscut and my first attempt to recondition a saw. No manufacture etch, 36 inches, champion tooth, flat ground. Before:


    The rakers are filed, I'll try sweging later. I made a guage, and used a hammer as an anvil, and a geologist's hammer to set the teeth:


    Took it for a spin last week on some well seasoned black cherry:


    Even though I have never used a crosscut before, I think it should do better. Think I'll try it in some other types of wood before I do anything to it though. Thanks for looking.
    thats a real beauty... turned out very nice

  5. #105
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    20,612
    Damn man. That is beautiful right there.


    Baryonyx Knife Co. ~Trusted specialists in high value, low cost knives and tools.

    "To live at all is miracle enough."
    — Mervyn Peake

  6. #106
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Maple Valley, WA
    Posts
    8,364
    Seasoned cherry is a tough test. Try a green hard wood. If it doesn't cut well then consider re-sharpening the blade.

    The Champion pattern is designed to cut hardwoods. The lance tooth was designed for softer west coast trees. Either pattern will do well on either wood when well sharpened. The difference is subtle but if you consider that men used these saws day in and day out to earn their living then you can understand why they wanted a tool fine-tuned for their particular work.

  7. #107
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Pawht-land, Maine
    Posts
    1,043
    Quote Originally Posted by Square_peg View Post
    Seasoned cherry is a tough test. Try a green hard wood. If it doesn't cut well then consider re-sharpening the blade.

    The Champion pattern is designed to cut hardwoods. The lance tooth was designed for softer west coast trees. Either pattern will do well on either wood when well sharpened. The difference is subtle but if you consider that men used these saws day in and day out to earn their living then you can understand why they wanted a tool fine-tuned for their particular work.
    I had a 2 man perf lance that, before I refiled, had very little set (under 5/1000) and I swedged the crap out of the rakers. That thing cut like mad in green maple, pulling like 2 inch long noodles and cutting quite fast. Of course now I have 12/1000 set for green softwoods so it would not cut so well in hard wood.

  8. #108
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Maple Valley, WA
    Posts
    8,364
    Green maple isn't that hard. At least our Oregon Broadleaf Maple isn't especially hard when green. It's still considered a 'hardwood', though.

  9. #109
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Pawht-land, Maine
    Posts
    1,043
    Quote Originally Posted by Square_peg View Post
    Green maple isn't that hard. At least our Oregon Broadleaf Maple isn't especially hard when green. It's still considered a 'hardwood', though.
    This was Sugar Maple, or as it is known by outside of the syrup regions, Rock Maple. It's pretty darn hard, I make axe handles with it. Not as hard as Hickory, but almost as hard as White Ash.

  10. #110
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    20,612
    Quote Originally Posted by G-pig View Post
    This was Sugar Maple, or as it is known by outside of the syrup regions, Rock Maple. It's pretty darn hard, I make axe handles with it. Not as hard as Hickory, but almost as hard as White Ash.
    Yup! Our maple here is pretty tough stuff.


    Baryonyx Knife Co. ~Trusted specialists in high value, low cost knives and tools.

    "To live at all is miracle enough."
    — Mervyn Peake

  11. #111
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    SW Michigan
    Posts
    1,391
    Quote Originally Posted by G-pig View Post
    What measurements for the set and raker depth did you use?
    Set for the cutters is 0.012 inchs. The rakers are 0.007 inches below the cutters.

  12. #112
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    SW Michigan
    Posts
    1,391
    Quote Originally Posted by bearhunter View Post
    thats a real beauty... turned out very nice
    Thanks!

  13. #113
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    SW Michigan
    Posts
    1,391
    Quote Originally Posted by FortyTwoBlades View Post
    Damn man. That is beautiful right there.
    Thanks!

  14. #114
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    SW Michigan
    Posts
    1,391
    Quote Originally Posted by Square_peg View Post
    Seasoned cherry is a tough test. Try a green hard wood. If it doesn't cut well then consider re-sharpening the blade.

    The Champion pattern is designed to cut hardwoods. The lance tooth was designed for softer west coast trees. Either pattern will do well on either wood when well sharpened. The difference is subtle but if you consider that men used these saws day in and day out to earn their living then you can understand why they wanted a tool fine-tuned for their particular work.
    Thanks for the reply and suggestions.

  15. #115
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Pawht-land, Maine
    Posts
    1,043
    Quote Originally Posted by rjdankert View Post
    Set for the cutters is 0.012 inchs. The rakers are 0.007 inches below the cutters.
    Yeah, that would probably cut green poplar or alder quite well. 12/1000 is quite a bit, I use that much for my green softwood saws. You might try it in green conifer too and see how it works for that, I have a Simonds tuttle tooth that works great for pine, that saw is 10/1000 for both rakers and cutter set.

  16. #116
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    SW Michigan
    Posts
    1,391
    Quote Originally Posted by G-pig View Post
    Yeah, that would probably cut green poplar or alder quite well. 12/1000 is quite a bit, I use that much for my green softwood saws. You might try it in green conifer too and see how it works for that, I have a Simonds tuttle tooth that works great for pine, that saw is 10/1000 for both rakers and cutter set.
    Thanks, I'll have to find some poplar. Right now I have some kind of red pine that came down in a storm in February. I thought I might give that a try.

  17. #117
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Pawht-land, Maine
    Posts
    1,043
    I saw a video the other day of a 4 year old kid cutting a log with one of the saws I filed. Pretty cool the saw was doing work being run by someone who probably couldn't lift the 4 foot saw out of the kerf without help =)

  18. #118
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Maple Valley, WA
    Posts
    8,364
    What fun for a kid! That's the nice thing about a 48" single buck. The weight of the saw is enough that you don't need to bear down on it. Just move it back and forth and it will cut.

  19. #119
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    334
    So... I found a saw today in good shape, and bought it for 10. A simonds number 6 crosscut saw, about 6 feet long, with standard teeth just like a hardware store saw. Needs a healthy bit of derusting, and has some small pits, but I couldn't resist. Been wanting one for a while. Not sure what to do know though at all. I did find though that the teeth are offset to the side maybe a 3/16'' either direction. Is that a bit much or is it just me?

    And does anyone have restoration advice? So far I've been hitting it with steel wool and pb blaster. Taking a while.

  20. #120
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    CO
    Posts
    196
    I had to take some big pine trees down this week (beetle kill). About half way through cutting them up with a more modern saw (Stihl), my FIL (70yro) mentions that he should have brought his two man saw. Turns out the saw was his Grandfather's. Now my interest is piqued.

    I will get pics my next trip to his place.

Page 6 of 23 FirstFirst ... 234567891016 ... LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •