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Thread: What is THE American Traditional knife to you

  1. #61
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    Growing up in England as a kid in the early 60s
    The only American knife I knew about was the Bowie
    Davy Crockett and the Bowie knife
    Neeman

  2. #62
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    Stockman came first to mind--Buck, Old Timer, Case, GEC

  3. #63
    Barlow knife was my first thought.

  4. #64
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    Well, the first knives that came to my mind have followed pretty much along the lines of what's been mentioned. Which is to say that I think there are multiples!!!

    Perhaps it's better to think of A single knife for a given time frame or style.

    The Buck 110 was the very first knife that jumped to my mind. Like most things American, I think it's a design born out of a melting pot. Place an older Bowie-style hunting knife and a French/Spanish locking folder into a blender and you get the Buck 110. But as others have noted, it is more of a recent thing as far as history goes - rather recent. One reason why I think the 110 is so important is that it legitimized the locking folder. It's impossible for me to think about the existence of today's tactical folders without drawing a line back through the Buck 110. It also has achieved icon status in the world of customization and modifications. Sort of like the Chevy small block v8 of knives. Big, bold, mass produced and destined to be modified and hot-rodded.

    In terms of fixed blade knives, the Bowie style hunter and the Kabar fighting knives (one big family) are easily THE American fixed blade.

    I have a harder time accepting any single slip joint as being THE American pocket knife though as I see them to be more regionally focused. I grew up in the Northeast and grew up seeing more 4 blade campers of various sorts than any others. Stockmen, Congress styles and Barlows all have their place in our history as well. (And all borrowed and deriving from earlier European designs and influences).

    In terms of today, I think the case that was made for the Leatherman is very strong. I would add to that the Spyderco folding tactical, which I think is the first folder to use the thumb opener hole and pocket clip.
    Last edited by pinnah; 12-20-2011 at 11:30 AM.

  5. #65
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    Buck 110 - folder

    Bowie knife - fixed

  6. #66
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    Old Timer stockman, hands down. The 34OT was the most popular Schrade knife, and therefore (perhaps) the most popular American knife ever. Their other stockman models like the 8OT and 108OT were also sold for many years in very high quantities. Not only were they affordable to almost everyone, they were sold at practically every hardware and sporting goods store in the country.

    Yes, I would agree that the Buck 110 is an American icon. But really, there aren't many people, either now or past, who wear sheath knives on their belts.

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by GLDNDomer View Post
    Buck 110 - folder

    Bowie knife - fixed
    My choices as well, although when I was young (before the 110 came out) most men I knew carried some sort of traditional knife. The stockman was a pretty popular choice.

  8. #68
    My first two thoughts were Bowie, and Buck 110. When I was growing up, the Buck 110 was the knife country people carried, it seemed. Isn't the Marine Kabar basically a Bowie?

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug S View Post
    Isn't the Marine Kabar basically a Bowie?
    That's my understanding. The Bowie morphed into hunting knives such as those by Marbles and Western. During the beginning of the WWII, soldiers bought hunting knives. According to the wikipedia entry on Kabar knives, the Western L77 was sold that the San Diego PX. After that, the Marines worked with Camillus to create the Mark II, which became the Ka-Bar.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ka-Bar#World_War_II

  10. #70
    Pinnah,

    Thanks for the response and info.

  11. #71
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    Nowadays, I am starting to think, the classic American knife comes out of Golden

    But the real answer is the 4 1/4" stockman

    (or maybe a clip point jack )

  12. #72
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    Another vote for the 110. It was the first knife that I thought of followed closely by the stockman.
    Jim
    "If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they go."
    -Will Rogers

    R.I.P. Sadie
    May 4,2004 - March 25,2008

  13. #73
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    The trapper? I would say Buck 110, but to the world, it would have to be the bowie.

  14. #74
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    Buck 110 and a classic Bowie, let's say the Ka-Bar 1217 USMC.
    Either of those names conjure up images of the Stars and Stripes, fireworks, eagles soaring over the mountains, and moonshine.
    Gear wise- the Zippo, hands down.

  15. #75
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    Fixed blade: Bowie style

    Locking folder: Buck 110

    Slipjoint: Stockman, any brand

    (My opinions, of course. )

    ~Chris
    I'm on an indefinite hiatus from forums participation. Other life priorities right now. I can be contacted through my profile.
    http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/sh...om-bladeforums

  16. #76
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob W View Post
    Old Timer stockman, hands down. The 34OT was the most popular Schrade knife, and therefore (perhaps) the most popular American knife ever. Their other stockman models like the 8OT and 108OT were also sold for many years in very high quantities. Not only were they affordable to almost everyone, they were sold at practically every hardware and sporting goods store in the country.
    Good call . The Schrade 34OT is my personal all time favorite slip joint.

  17. #77
    buck 110

  18. #78
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    The Mameluke is a great looking sword! USMC Officers use these bad boys but the sword is originally from Africa.

    I'm going with a bowie knife.



    Quote Originally Posted by Rupestris View Post
    I'd have to vote ka-Bar and 110 as well, but, I still think this is a fine representation of a traditional "American" edged weapon.

    "We'll take two chicken pot pies"
    ~Randy

  19. #79
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    In my youth it was the Boy Scout knife/camp knife or stockman. being New York it probly made by Camillus or Schrade, fixed was eather skinning pattern. or Bowie pattern knife wich would include the USMC Combat / Utility knife
    Common sense isn't all that common.

  20. #80
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    The Bowie and Buck 110 come to mind.

    The Bowie brings up thoughts of of the great Wild west, and the 110 as the all favorite working knife hanging from people's belts everywhere.

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