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Thread: Something different: The Barong

  1. #1
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    Something different: The Barong


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    Some of my friends are from the Philippines and recommended the Barong for camping and self-defense.
    I wonder if they are bias? Anyway, here's a quick video review:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yq8wv...lYi9Auk0hB7fE=

  2. #2
    Hey there sweetcostarica, nice vid. :-)

    I happen to have a barong (not sure how old it is). It used to belong to my late dad.

    I haven't used it except to 'paper cut' and 'leg hair shave' test. Crazy sharp! Hehe.

    Here are some pics:



























    Cheers!

    nepki
    Last edited by nepki; 04-06-2012 at 07:42 AM.

  3. I have a couple, one a traditional knife, and a CS barong machete. In agriculture, they function similarly to a machete, but with a pointy tip. I just used my CS version to cut down a bunch of last year's fennel stalks in the yard. The stalks were hard enough that I used them for garden stakes, pounding them into the ground with a 3 lb sledge. The CS barong went through them easily.

    In the self defence arena, the barong can slash like a machete, but thrust with the point as well. It, like many dual-use tools/weapons, has minimal hand protection for the user. For such weapons, be they barongs or khukuris, the holder is more vulnerable to having his hand sniped at, and he does not have the parrying options available that even a minimal guard makes feasable.
    Howard Wallace
    *************

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by sweetcostarica View Post
    Some of my friends are from the Philippines and recommended the Barong for camping and self-defense.
    I wonder if they are bias? [/URL]
    SCR,

    I'm sure they are biased, but probably with good reason. I'm fascinated by the array of ethnic blades I've seen. We all have favorites, but common sense tells me that a tool/weapon design lasting decades or centuries has something going for it. Otherwise it wouldn't have endured. It looks like a useful blade for the reasons Howard mentioned. It's certainly designed to not slip from your grasp while swinging! I enjoy seeing these different types of knives. Often it seems the local favored blade is/was the most basic tool for existence of the populace, at least in the past or in less industrialized areas. These original "survival" tools really make me wonder about what it was/is like to live in the exotic lands from where they came. My only complaint with this wide range of styles is that I want them all Thanks for posting.

  5. #5
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    Truly, your father's Barong is a work of Art that inspires amazement. Handmade, created by a master no doubt, the scabbard and blade are perfect examples of what I see especially in Philippine weaponry. Which is functional pieces of art.
    Thanks nepi
    Last edited by sweetcostarica; 04-07-2012 at 12:36 AM.

  6. #6
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    Howard Wallace said:
    In the self defence arena, the barong can slash like a machete, but thrust with the point as well. It, like many dual-use tools/weapons, has minimal hand protection for the user. For such weapons, be they barongs or khukuris, the holder is more vulnerable to having his hand sniped at, and he does not have the parrying options available that even a minimal guard makes feasible.
    Good point Howard but I think the people of Southeast Asia fought in a diffident way when they used guard-less weapons. Most of these tools are design for slashing/chopping. Their training with them must have had techniques that minimized the clear risk of cutting their fingers off while thrusting (if they did trust at all with them). But this my opinion.

    jdk1 said:
    We all have favorites, but common sense tells me that a tool/weapon design lasting decades or centuries has something going for it. Otherwise it wouldn't have endured. It looks like a useful blade for the reasons Howard mentioned. It's certainly designed to not slip from your grasp while swinging! I enjoy seeing these different types of knives.
    Oh yeah, the Philippine people especially have a wide array of weapons to use on the farm or on the battlefield. Part of the reason for this is that in the past many nations tried (some succeeded) to conquer this country. Like the Spanish conquering explorer Magellan in 1521, who lost his life in a battle while attempting to make a landing in Punta Engano. Punta Engano is the north-eastern corner of Mactan Island.
    Chief Lapu Lapu.jpgferdinand magellan.jpg
    Death of Magellan.jpg
    Ferdinand Magellan was killed with one of these Filipino weapons by Chief Lapu-Lapu. If I did not like the Kukri so much I would use one of the Philippine weapons like this Barong or maybe a Pira. Below link is a Pira in action.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zfGx4wkjJbY

  7. Quote Originally Posted by sweetcostarica View Post
    ...Good point Howard but I think the people of Southeast Asia fought in a diffident way when they used guard-less weapons. Most of these tools are design for slashing/chopping. Their training with them must have had techniques that minimized the clear risk of cutting their fingers off while thrusting (if they did trust at all with them). But this my opinion.
    ...
    Indeed they did fight in a different way. You'll note the current techniques of escrima (from the Spanish word for fencing) emphasise close fighting in the inside ranges. It is mandatory to get into this range if confronting a fencer with a weapon with superior parying ability. Otherwise you will be pecked to death slowly from the long range. Another difference was the use of makeshift protection. This came in the form of binding the weapon to the hand (arnis de mano or harness of the hand), or binding the areas for protection from sniping attacks.

    The major danger to the hand is not that it will slip forward during a thrust. Rather, the opponent will intentionally cut the hand.
    Howard Wallace
    *************

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    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Wallace View Post
    The major danger to the hand is not that it will slip forward during a thrust. Rather, the opponent will intentionally cut the hand.
    Touché.

    It is ironic that this move, the cut to the hand was in Star Wars: Episode V - The Empire Strikes Back and everyone who has seen the movie remembers that part.
    hand cut.jpg

  9. Bob Anderson, a master fencer, choreographed many (all?) the Star Wars lightsabre scenes. He recently passed away.

    see http://articles.nydailynews.com/2012...luke-skywalker

    He really knew what he was doing.
    Howard Wallace
    *************

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    I wasn't sure who the choreographer was, thanks. Somehow I get the feeling Howard Wallace is or was a fencer.
    fencing 1.jpg
    Picture is of the "cut to the hand" technique

  11. #11
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    the barong was used to deadly effect during the moro insurrection against the US Army in 1899-1913 (and against the spanish earlier). there were instances where a jurementado attacking an american soldier cut him in two at the waist with one before he was cut down. this was the main reason the front line troops asked their families to send them .45 colts to replace the puny .38's that were army bean counter issue, and which led to the .45acp.

    things haven't changed much, we're fighting islamic terrorists with .38's again.
    CAVE CANEM RADIX LECTI ET SEMPER PARATUS
    Dic, hospes Spartae nos te hic vidisse iacentes,
    Dum sanctis patriae legibus obsequimur


    My goal in life is to be as good of a person my dog already thinks I am.

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    That's right kronckew. This is a good historic point to bring up and shows how effective Philippine weapon are.
    You are also correct in that we haven't learned a thing from history in the hand gun department.
    Current British Army Issue pistol: Browning L9A1 9mm
    Current United States Army pistol: Beretta 92 9mm

    Below is an excellent article in PDF on this very topic:
    http://www.morolandhistory.com/Relat...0Colt%2045.pdf

    Of note: I believe only Special Forces can use larger caliber pistols like the 1911 45ACP.

  13. #13
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    Barong are awesome slashers, like a khukuri. Beautiful too.

    Steve






  14. #14
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    steve ferguson, my much younger twin brother, is the king of gunongs, and his barong/kris are also to die for. he owns ALL the good ones.

    except one.

    this one is mine, mine i say. mine. no you can't have it. mine.
    CAVE CANEM RADIX LECTI ET SEMPER PARATUS
    Dic, hospes Spartae nos te hic vidisse iacentes,
    Dum sanctis patriae legibus obsequimur


    My goal in life is to be as good of a person my dog already thinks I am.

  15. #15
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    The craftsmanship on the handle of Nepki and your Barong is outstanding. It also seems that the scabbards (like Nepki's) are carved just as nicely. This is one of the attractions for me to the tool/weapons of SE Asia.
    Moro Barong.JPGmoro weapons, island of mindanao.jpgphilippines.jpg
    My other attraction is, like a woman, they are beautiful yet deadly.
    As we have talked about their history, here's a list of the blade types:
    the Kris, Barong, Pira,
    Panabas, Kampilan,
    Bangkon, Banyan,
    Gayang, Laring, Lahot,
    Utak, Susuwat, Janap,
    Kambantuli, Binakuko,
    and Pinsawali.
    These numerous blades are just from the Moro of southern Philippines. There are other Northern Philippine Blades, Visayan Blades, Sansibar Swords of Leyte, there are Knives & Daggers, Impact Weapons, and Igorot Tribal Weapons (The Igorot are Head Hunters ).

    So if you want to know who the Mother of all cold steel culture is? It is the Philippines, period.

  16. #16
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    ...and ginunting, pinute, talibong (garab), etc. etc.
    CAVE CANEM RADIX LECTI ET SEMPER PARATUS
    Dic, hospes Spartae nos te hic vidisse iacentes,
    Dum sanctis patriae legibus obsequimur


    My goal in life is to be as good of a person my dog already thinks I am.

  17. #17
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    Hey kronckew you have an interesting avatar. What is it's meaning? That is if you don't mind me asking.
    I see you're from the UK is it a popular cartoon there?
    question.jpg

  18. #18
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    i drew the avatar picture myself. i had two greyhounds, my male, Blue (he was a blue brindle), passed away about a year and a half ago, his friend, millie (white with dark brindle patches) is still with me, she's 12 now. i added the wings to blue after he passed over the bridge with the valkyries. here's a silly pajama picture of them in better days.


    ...and in their undress doggie costumes


    'cave canem radix lecti' is latin for 'beware the couch potato dogs'. greyhounds are often referred to as 45mph couch potatoes. the 'semper paratus' is the USCG motto, 'always ready'. i was a USCG officer for 5 yrs active, 7 years active reserve, and on inactive standby reserve since (since i got too old to go shoot stuff). family is from alabama (hence the CSA Consulate ref), i've lived here in the UK last 20 years or so after leaving saudi. wife (now ex) was english.
    Last edited by kronckew; 04-09-2012 at 04:14 AM.
    CAVE CANEM RADIX LECTI ET SEMPER PARATUS
    Dic, hospes Spartae nos te hic vidisse iacentes,
    Dum sanctis patriae legibus obsequimur


    My goal in life is to be as good of a person my dog already thinks I am.

  19. Beautiful dogs. Thanks for the insight into your avatar and motto you have given us all.
    Howard Wallace
    *************

  20. #20
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    thanks. millie is a retired racer (professional name was balto millenium) with a distinguished career, placed in the money on over 2/3 of her 80 races. Blue i got as a pup, he never raced, he was picked up by the Reading police & turned over to the shelter. they suspect he was a traveller's (gypsy's) rabbit dog in training & escaped. he sure liked chasing rabits, fox, deer, etc.

    the small print

    Dic, hospes Spartae nos te hic vidisse iacentes,
    Dum sanctis patriae legibus obsequimur

    are sort of my main motto. for those who do not know, they are the latin translation of the words inscribed on the tomb of the greeks at thermopylae:

    944_Simonides_monument_to_Spartans[1].jpg

    ὦ ξεῖν᾿, ἀγγέλλειν Λακεδαιμονίοις ὅτι τῇδε
    κείμεθα τοῖς κείνων πειθόμενοι νομίμοις.

    oh, traveller passing by,
    go tell the spartans that here we lie
    obedient to our orders.

    or in the words of another who shall not fade away - duty, honour, country.

    the coast guard's unwritten motto is 'you have to go out, you don't have to come back'.
    CAVE CANEM RADIX LECTI ET SEMPER PARATUS
    Dic, hospes Spartae nos te hic vidisse iacentes,
    Dum sanctis patriae legibus obsequimur


    My goal in life is to be as good of a person my dog already thinks I am.

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