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Thread: Favorite hunting knife?

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrIndianaJones View Post
    A lovely timeless classic collection Codger...
    Thanks. I have quite a few more of those that aren't shown. And I am certainly not averse to trying out new knives and other patterns of older knives from time to time. But I keep returning to these favorite two. Mostly because I have a lot of "muscle memory" of them and know by feel how the cutting is going when I can't see the blade. As with a choice of firearm, to me this is most important. Practice and familiarity with what you choose to use.
    "A knife in a mans hand is as precious as a diamond necklace on a womans neck" Felix Mirando

    As the great Andrew Martin once said "One is glad to be of service".

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Codger_64 View Post
    Thanks. I have quite a few more of those that aren't shown. And I am certainly not averse to trying out new knives and other patterns of older knives from time to time. But I keep returning to these favorite two. Mostly because I have a lot of "muscle memory" of them and know by feel how the cutting is going when I can't see the blade. As with a choice of firearm, to me this is most important. Practice and familiarity with what you choose to use.
    "Muscle memory" Haa ha... I like that! I hear you. I guess one can read all the reviews one wants, but one only ever really gets to know and love a knife by experiencing it!

    While I like the modern blade materials and manufacturing concepts, I find myself becomming more and more interested in knifes with handles made of the traditional classic materials like stacked leather, Cocobola and Black Oak woods, Jigged Bone and even mother of pearl. Its hard to beat the performance, durability and charm offered by natural materials, don't you agree?

    I hope American knife companies never outsource manufacturing to China, like so many countries are doing nowdays. I hope to be able to still have the option of buying a quality American knife, made in America. While Fallkniven's are now made in Japan, the Japanese have always had a very good reputation for producing high quality blades. Added to this Fallkniven knifes are designed in Sweden and quality controlled from Sweden.

    What is you're ideal blade length size for you're favourite belt (sheath knife)? When I'm out camping and hunting, while I like somthing with a 5" to 6" (inch) blade, I prefer somthing 3.8" to 4.3", the latter being ideal. This is because I find this size more compact and better overall as I can use it for cooking and utility tasks in addition to just using it for hunting. I read somewhere recently that there was a tradition in times gone by for American Mountain Men to sport large bowie style knifes with blades up to 10 inches long! Australian Stockmen (Cowboys) used similar large knifes (VF-1 I think it was called and it was utilised in WW2 in the Pacific- Some American soldiers collected these). Here in Australia, particularly when I was young, and what I learn't from my father, was that anything 6" or more was considered a 'serious' knife. I find blade length has become an interesting topic for discussion lately. I don't know if it's my imagination, but the commonly accepted blade length for general purpose belt knifes (sheath knifes) seems to be getting shorter these days. Maybe this is because there has been an increase in backpacking, bush walking, and camping trends and a reduction in the traditional hunters and bushmen like us. I'm all for preserving wildlife, but it is getting ridiculous in some states in Australia. This is one of the reasons I left Sydney and now live in the Northern Territory- Australia's least Policed and most easy going state! They are maximising mining opportunities in some of our last most isolated, untouched and preserved areas like the Kimberley in Western Australia, yet denying people the right to hunt and even become members of knife clubs (like in WA). Maybe we are a dying breed! What is you're view on blade length?
    Last edited by DrIndianaJones; 10-31-2012 at 01:16 PM.

  3. #43
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    I received my Fallkniven F2z last Wednesday and could'nt wait to open the package and see it in the flesh. The knife came with Zytel sheath of course (No leather option on the F2, most likely because of safety reasons due to its penetration ability), Fallkiven stickers and a small placitc stand bearing the Fallkniven name were also included with the courtesy of my supplier- It pays to be a loyal customer. I also really appreciated Fallkniven's comprehensive description and information of the knifes uses written on the unfussed white box packaging common with all mainstream Fallkniven models.

    I will describe the knife for anyone who's interested in using this knife for hunting, fishing, camping, adventure or survival purposes like I intend to do. The handle seems to fit my medium sized hand perfectly. As with most Fallkniven 'F' handles it has a subtle blade safety guard design, however I also noticed the rear of the handle does a very good job of preventing you're hand from slipping off the handle and loosing the knife, while cutting through things, even if the handle is covered in blood and guts! Although I did'nt, one review mentioned sanding down the cremonum handles texture as they found it a little rough on their hands. While I have more office warrior type hands than those of the caliced bricklayer, I personally would'nt recommend doing this believing that the depth of texture is necessary when dressing game can and does get messy and I believe the texture is likely to round smoother with age.

    The blade is perfect at is relatively short (As the company describes) 4.3 inches in length for a belt/ sheath knife. I've mentioned in previous knife reviews I find this the best compromise for such a knife not only when hunting, but for general purpose use about the camp and on all my outdoor adventures. The accepted compromised length range for ultimate survival knifes being between 3.8" inches and 5.1 inches). For example I noticed the F2z's blade was just long enough to cut a loaf of Vienna bread without having to turn it. At 2.5mm thick some may criticise this knife where durability is concerned in field and survival applications, and I am inquisitive in this regard, but more on that later. The geomerty of the F2's blade shape makes this knife born to slice and cut, not to mention penetrate! The first thing I noticed about actually using this knife is that contol is uncanny. Sure Fallkniven states the F2, quote, 'cuts anything quickly and precisely', although what you will come to really appreciate is the concept is so effotless! When sectioning a lamb carcass, because cutting is so quick and effortless, you find yourself nestling the spine of the burried blade against bone, which helps aid you're navigation. I managed to davour a large chicken in minutes and cut up a side of lamb with this knife, cutting through bones joints, tendons and all with ease.

    This is where blade thickness comes into play; and as mentioned earlier is perhaps the only criticism some may level at the F2 as far as considering it for survival knife category. At 2.5mm thick this is a relatively strong blade and with Fallknivens' first, world leading laminate technology, the company states you can expect a further 20% increase in strength than other quality stainless and carbon blades. The blade does flex ever so slightly during moderate to heavier going, however this aids in making your work with the knife so effortless, and I believe could even absorb impacts with bone and other objects during heavier use thus protecting or at least reducing its structure from cracks and its edge from chipping/ bluntening. Consider also the slender and relatively thinness of the F2's blade gives you another plus,considered essential by many adventruers, survivalists, outdoorsmen, campers, hikers and military people and that is lightness. While Fallkniven does not publish the weight of the F2z on its website, I estimate the F2z to be less than half the weight of the F1z Military Pilots Survival Knife, which weighs in at 150 grams and the F1z is the knife considered by many to be the best contemporary, practical, weight-compromising survival knife in the world.

    Tip penetration and progression is first rate and was one of the deciding factors that helped me choose and begin to consider this knife as a general purpose survival knife. The the end of the blade is honed to a very sharp point, and what I found interesting and unlike many similar blade designs even the spine of the knife is contoured to accomodates this sharp point. Fallkniven states while the F2 is primarily designed for 'filliting, cutting and cleaning fish', although it is also categorized on Fallkniven's website and stated by them it can be used as a hunting knife; that it is a knife that, 'need not be put away after outdoor use but can be utilised in the kitchen'. The slender blade allows it when dressing to stab through a large chicken to its backbone and a side of lamb to the hilt with very minimal effort from you're actions. If you're needs include defence and personal security in the wild or elsewhere, I cannot stress enough that this knife is a very, very formidable companion. In fact due to the slenderness and geometry of the blade and its penetration ability I would go as far as saying it could serve as one of the best trench knifes ever! That said be warned it is a very dangerous knife and needs to be treated with respect and safety during use and kept in its factory sheath and out of harms way when not in use. I say this not to out of exaggeration or melodrama, but aside from Fallkniven's world leading extremely stay-sharp VG10 steel laminate metalorology risking cutting injury, if you fell on this knife it would most likely kill you.

    Austhetics. While the blade geometry of the F2 is by no means a new design it is strikingly unique. At first glance you either love it or hate it. However, I ask you to be intrigued by it if not to consider it, using the intelligible Swedish minimalist idom 'form follows function' as you're guiding priority. When studying the knife, you notice that the contours of the blade and the factory honed point exude competence and agressiveness.

    Verdict: Can one even entertain the thought that the Fallkniven F2z is the worlds best survival knife, or is it nothing more than an excellent fishing knife or an ultimate kitchen knife at best? I will discuss this by comparing and contrasting the Fallkniven F1z, which is highly regarded as being the best survival knife in the world today, as far as practicality and purpose is concerned. If we account for the fact that the critical and universally accepted deciding factors of 'purpose' and 'practicality' are best priorities in choosing the ultimate survival knife, it could be argued the F2 becomes a very challenging alternative, to even the Fallkniven F1z. If I were to be completely honest personal human preference is also one of them- although this can sometimes often be categorized in higher proportions with factors like purpose and practicality. A very wise forum member once said somthing I have never forgotten and has became the cricual thesis behind my personal choice of both a belt knife (or sheath knife) and a folding knife (or pocket knife), "The best knife is the one you have with you". The F2z is definetely a knife you can have with you at less than half the weight of even the F1z (F1=150grams), yet with a longer blade (F2z 4.3 inches) than F1z's (3.8 inches) yet F2z is still very compact by survival knife blade standards. Fallkniven categorizes the F2z as a hunting knife, yet as their International Sales Manager Mr. Heitenforgen accentuated, all Fallkniven's are built with strength and durability in mind and with the views that while their history and influences on manufacture are steeped in Scandinavian hunting and fishing, their knifes are designed with the view that a person will use their knifes for many tasks, separate and other to what the knife was categorised to be used for. With this and all the aforementioned information in mind the F2z is a perfect fishing, camping, backpacking, food and general purpose outdoor utility knife. In terms of survival applications the F2z would perform very, very well indeed in terms of dressing small and medium game, cutting, slicing, penetrating and defence, and in light if these needs it is extremely durable while being a relatively strong knife. That said the F2 knife is not suited for prying, battoning or chopping, however the F1 is not only barely capable of these tasks, supporting reviews I have read support that the F1z barely has the blade length to accomplish such tasks and you risk damaging the blades tip in battoning, drop point blade design aside. Added to this reviews further support the F1z is not recommended for battoning as the primary purpose of a knife is cutting, so why risk the only survival tool you have for tasks like building a shelter or raft, when such tasks can be accomplished by hand and careful selection of available materials. It could further be argued that the drop point blade design of the F1z while offering more strength than F2z in prying tasks, it is 99% less effective where the task of penetration is concerned- the latter an important task when dressing game and vital one where self defence is concerned, crucial and sometimes forgotton elements with a combat (fighting knife)/ survival knife. It is for all these reasons I rate the Fallkniven F2z as the worlds best combat/ survival knife and the worlds best hunting belt (sheath knife).
    Last edited by DrIndianaJones; 11-02-2012 at 10:08 AM.

  4. #44
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    Wall of text syndrome.

    I'm afraid my head will explode.





    Big Mike

  5. #45
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    You go doc!!!

  6. #46
    I have a Kershaw Echo (Ken Onion) knife that works great for skinning but I'm primarily using a scalpel for everything now... I suppose a good fillet knife would work well.






    Eli

  7. #47
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    'God Speed Tactical', Never seen one of these. Appears like it would work well, but personally I'm more of a fan of the traditional knife, somthing I can care for and thats an extension of me. Somthing I can use not just for hunting, but for a variety of tasks when I'm camping out, including sub-heavy ones. I don't go in for disposable things and I leave scalpels for surgeons. Just my view and each to their own I guess...
    Last edited by DrIndianaJones; 11-03-2012 at 01:27 AM.

  8. #48
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    Thanks 'Hepclass'. I guess I got a bit carried away While I'm not new to knifes I am pretty new to knife forums. Its like when you catch you're first fish!

    Another consideration is I like to write at least one review on a knife I own because I hope to help others when they are considering a knife I know about. I'm very fussy with my knifes and I know there are others out there like me. I get tired of reading reviews that are'nt comprehensive enough to make an informed decision about a particular knife, hence the mass of text!
    Last edited by DrIndianaJones; 11-03-2012 at 01:34 AM.

  9. #49
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    As mentioned, there is no "the best hunting knife". Or else every maker would be only making one pattern which every knowledgeble user bought and used. As with "survival knives", "kitchen knives", "fishing knives", the "best" is the one which one has in hand and knows how to use.

    But this "truth" does not sell new knife designs. What sells is the illusion that "this knife" is the ultimate for a purpose. Back at the turn of the previous century, people were beginning to find more and more liesure time and a new "fad" came about called "outing". The people were refered to as "outers" and "outing clubs" were formed in most major colleges and universities. "Outing" and Outers" magazines were born. Cutleries responded by making a new pattern of knife to sell to these new outdoorsmen and women called the "Outers Pattern". In short order nearly every maker was making a variation if not an outright copy. Variations continued to evolve until WWII came along. After the war, many outdoorsmen gravitated to military knife designs. Cutleries responded again.

    What works best for me is a pair of knives, one short and one long, first designed and marketed in the mid-sixties to the early seventies, made of pedestrian 1095HC steel, handled with the relatively new-then plastic, DuPont Delrin. They work as well today as they ever did. They are not worn-out globs of rust and pits. Sure, I own other knives (just South of a thousand, some as old as the late 1800's and some new as today), but they are just curiosities and the product of idle hands and a bit of spare cash from time to time. I have used those original knives long enough to be vary familiar with them and I know from experience what I can and cannot expect them to do. We each have to find the "best knife" for ourselves.
    "A knife in a mans hand is as precious as a diamond necklace on a womans neck" Felix Mirando

    As the great Andrew Martin once said "One is glad to be of service".

  10. #50
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    I read one post a while back of a fella who used a filet knife to field dress his first buck. That would not be one of top choices, but it sure beats an Xacto knife. He was looking for the ultimate hunting knife, for under $50 of course.

  11. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by 22-rimfire View Post
    I read one post a while back of a fella who used a filet knife to field dress his first buck. That would not be one of top choices, but it sure beats an Xacto knife. He was looking for the ultimate hunting knife, for under $50 of course.
    I've used, at different times, a pen knife, a stone chip and a piece of broken glass for that before. Field dressing a whitetail deer is, in my experience, the least demanding chore in the process of rendering one into meat.
    "A knife in a mans hand is as precious as a diamond necklace on a womans neck" Felix Mirando

    As the great Andrew Martin once said "One is glad to be of service".

  12. #52
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    Here's my Favorite hunting blade. Made by Mike Mossington of Northbay Ontario. ATS-34 with a big horn mountain ram handle and red liners!






  13. #53
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    I have a bunch of "hunting" knives but seem to like the mora companion or a CS pendeltin light hunter in the field. Both are under 15 bucks come razor sharp, maintain a nice edge, easy to get back to razor sharp, and are light weight in the pack. I might try my BK14 or BK24 this year but can beat a nice cheap fixed blade for field dressing. I prefer fixed blades so blood and gunk is easier to clean off. For processing my dad still uses old hickory kitchen and boning knives. Good fillet knife helps when slicing loin steaks etc.

  14. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Codger_64 View Post
    As mentioned, there is no "the best hunting knife". Or else every maker would be only making one pattern which every knowledgeble user bought and used. As with "survival knives", "kitchen knives", "fishing knives", the "best" is the one which one has in hand and knows how to use.

    But this "truth" does not sell new knife designs. What sells is the illusion that "this knife" is the ultimate for a purpose. Back at the turn of the previous century, people were beginning to find more and more liesure time and a new "fad" came about called "outing". The people were refered to as "outers" and "outing clubs" were formed in most major colleges and universities. "Outing" and Outers" magazines were born. Cutleries responded by making a new pattern of knife to sell to these new outdoorsmen and women called the "Outers Pattern". In short order nearly every maker was making a variation if not an outright copy. Variations continued to evolve until WWII came along. After the war, many outdoorsmen gravitated to military knife designs. Cutleries responded again.

    What works best for me is a pair of knives, one short and one long, first designed and marketed in the mid-sixties to the early seventies, made of pedestrian 1095HC steel, handled with the relatively new-then plastic, DuPont Delrin. They work as well today as they ever did. They are not worn-out globs of rust and pits. Sure, I own other knives (just South of a thousand, some as old as the late 1800's and some new as today), but they are just curiosities and the product of idle hands and a bit of spare cash from time to time. I have used those original knives long enough to be vary familiar with them and I know from experience what I can and cannot expect them to do. We each have to find the "best knife" for ourselves.

    This is brilliant. I guess I have been more of a theorist when it has come to selecting and labelling knifes, and as such this has taught me allot.

    Thanks for you're comments on the theory that two knifes work best. But just to clarify do you mean two fixed blades? What is you're opinion as far as you're smaller knife being a folder (pocket knife)? I usually carry a 3inch pocket knife (Fallkniven U2) when I'm hunting/ out bush in addition to my fixed blade knife.

    As for marketing propaganda I have come to learn, especially on the topic of hunting, camping and survival knifes that many of the new knifes being marketed by so many companies are largely inpractical and purposeless. Why? Mainly this is because they are too big and heavy, but more importantly too the blade widths are too thick, making them clumsy, inaccurate and just plain aweful to use uless you're cutting down a tree, and who really needs to do this with a knife.

    Although I know little about them, I'm looking forward to readng up on knifes from yesteryear. Like most things from the 60's and 70's they were built to last, my car and watch included!

    I found this bit of reading interesting about blade thickness and accurate knife use see;

    http://www.bushcraftuk.com/forum/arc...p/t-29415.html

  15. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by 22-rimfire View Post
    I read one post a while back of a fella who used a filet knife to field dress his first buck. That would not be one of top choices, but it sure beats an Xacto knife. He was looking for the ultimate hunting knife, for under $50 of course.
    Firstly I'm no expert hunter and only kill the odd game when I'm out camping and I don't want to appear like I know allot about dressing game either- I don't. I'm not suggesting the F2 is perfect for field dressing large game like a buck or buffalo and I haven't tried it. It will most likely do the job, but I find it works a treat with small to medium game like birds, sheep, goats, hogs and here downunder kangaroos.

    Also to clarify, the Fallkniven F2 while capable, is not really a 'filleting knife'. Filleting knifes are way more flexible. The F2 was designed as a general purpose field fishing knife, and is categroised as a butchers knife, however it can be described as a boning knife and as such has a blade width of 2.5mm.

    I use to dismiss this type of blade, and you're right in that you can pick this style of blade up cheaply. Try picking one up with a 4.3" blade length and 2.5mm width and try it. You'll be surprised how easy, comfortable and accurate it is to use. You may find yourself pleasantly surprised like I did. Then go out and buy yourself a Fallkniven F2z with the VG10 supersteel like I did!

    In the end, like Codger says, the knife that you feel good with is the right knife I guess!
    Last edited by DrIndianaJones; 11-05-2012 at 07:43 AM. Reason: Typo

  16. #56
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    I don't know that it is "brilliant", but is the best I can express what I have learned and prefer from my experiences in my environment with the particular game I encounter. Had I been born later and just now entered the hunting field, no doubt I would be biased toward one or two of the knives currently in fashion. Many people today would consider my choices to be as "out of style" as bell bottom pants. Two fixed blades, yes. They were in style and readily available when I began hunting seriously in my early twenties. Before that it was fish and small game and I used whatever small folding knife came to hand at the time.

    "A knife in a mans hand is as precious as a diamond necklace on a womans neck" Felix Mirando

    As the great Andrew Martin once said "One is glad to be of service".

  17. #57
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    I was just looking at some of my favorites. I think I'm seeing a pattern here.
    Rest in peace Maniacal Pete. I wish I could have done more.

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  18. #58
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    I have used an old Randall Made #11 more than any other through the years. This year though, I have a new one to try out.
    Rick Menefee did this Loveless style drop point in 154CM steel. Hollow ground, tapered tang, and sharper than my ex wife's tongue.
    Nemo me impune lacaset

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  19. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by black mamba View Post
    This one from David Farmer (differentially H-T'd L6 and bamboo) does a great job for me on big southern Illinois whitetails.

    Just saw this and had to say this is my new favourite.

  20. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by wdr270 View Post
    While I'll still use the rest the Moran will probably be my primary skinner for the forseeable future.
    Drop point or trailing point?

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