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Thread: Chef's Knives, What's Yours and Let's See Them!

  1. #1
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    Chef's Knives, What's Yours and Let's See Them!


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    Okay, good to know we've got a Kitchen Cutlery & Tools forum here on BF. Since this is a knife forum overall, why not a thread on Chef's Knives irregardless of specific brand name? Everyone here has to have at the very least one (1) Chef's Knife right? If so, what is it or what are they? How about your favorite go to one when in the kitchen to prepare something?



    My favorite go to and most used Chef's Knife is the Forschner Victorinox Fibrox. Just had to give these others a try to find out which one I like, otherwise how would I know right?

  2. #2
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    I've heard good things about the Victorinox being a great bang for the buck. What do you like most about it, and where might it fall short?

  3. #3
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    My go-to knife is a custom Landi with 1095 steel. I also use a small Menefee paring knife.



    I also have a Becker BK15 that gets used in the kitchen for tough jobs.


  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Nguyen View Post
    I've heard good things about the Victorinox being a great bang for the buck. What do you like most about it, and where might it fall short?
    Like you've heard and stated about the Forschner Victorinox, it is a 'great bang for the buck' to be sure! I've seen some of the videos of known chef's even saying that they still revert back to their first and favorite Forschner Knives, and that's even before they've attained where they are now. Just something about this knife that one has to simply try.

    While it may be "inexpensive" compared to other "high end" "luxury" cutlery knives, this Forschner is also quality built for what it was intended for. It's light, not "flimsy" or "cheap" as what one would find/expect at the Bargain Dollar Store. Fits like it's an extension of my hand. By the way, I do not throw my knives into the kitchen sink or dishwasher but hand wash them straight away after use. Even though it's light and compact (to me that), its ease of use with cutting, slicing, dicing, and the like through meat, vegetables, bread, sandwiches makes it a pleasure to use. No fish or poultry with this knife yet. I'm no chef mind you, let alone a cook! Just a single guy having a practical purposeful implement to prepare meals, that's all. As for this particular knife falling short or lacking in something, I've not cross that bridge yet. Maybe others have something to say about it and they're welcome to.

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Here's the weight the knives pictured above in their respective order:

    Global



    Shun



    Friedrich Dick



    Eberhard Schaaf



    Forschner Victorinox



    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Nice going on your kitchen cutlery tomsch!

  5. #5
    I fricken' LOVE my Vic./Forschner chef's knife. I see no reason to ever upgrade to anything else. It's comfortable, easy to clean, just the right blades shape, and it's THIN. Plus the edge retention balances it nicely between holding an edge well enough for repeated kitchen cutting but with great ease and rapidity of sharpening. It's a very "balanced" knife in its characteristics.


    Baryonyx Knife Co. ~Condors, Moras, Deluxe Tramontinas, and More!

    "To live at all is miracle enough."
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  6. #6
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    We use this everyday along with a Shun classic paring knife. Bjorgman Twist damasteel, Randy Jr. twist carbon damascus bolsters, rosewood burl handle. Just sharpened it on an Escher stone and it is razor sharp.

    Attached Images Attached Images
    Kris

  7. #7
    MT Damascus: That's a beauty, who is HHH?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by MT Damascus View Post
    We use this everyday along with a Shun classic paring knife. Bjorgman Twist damasteel, Randy Jr. twist carbon damascus bolsters, rosewood burl handle. Just sharpened it on an Escher stone and it is razor sharp.

    That's quite a knife you have there! Very nice.

    Quote Originally Posted by EIDO View Post
    MT Damascus: That's a beauty, who is HHH?
    I believe Randy Haas said that it stands for: "Hand Made, Heavy Duty, Hunting Knives."

  9. #9
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    My kitchen stuff is in storage (I'm moving), but I just found this K Sabatier that's going to get cleaned up and put to work.

    Looking for Irish/Congress Jacks, especially a Remington.

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    Thank you, it is a real joy to use, and thanks for answering the question, I belive you are right.

    Quote Originally Posted by Blunt Forged Edge View Post
    That's quite a knife you have there! Very nice.



    I believe Randy Haas said that it stands for: "Hand Made, Heavy Duty, Hunting Knives."

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by MT Damascus View Post
    That is sweet ! My wife and I would ruin that in the kitchen in 10 minutes !

    We use and abuse a Tichbourne and Haslinger pair, 440c and S30v, so far we haven't been able to break them.


  12. #12
    That fat one resembles a Swiss cleaver/"trimming knife." I love those things.


    Baryonyx Knife Co. ~Condors, Moras, Deluxe Tramontinas, and More!

    "To live at all is miracle enough."
    — Mervyn Peake

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    Nice pair gak! How's that Ticbourne working out for you?

  14. #14
    My only kitchen knife up until this week was a simple stainless Kiwi knife I bought in Thailand last year. It can take a great edge, but doesn't hold it long. This all changed on Friday when I decided to finally buy myself a Hong Kong-made chef's knife from a small store I've walked by dozens of times. Everyone knows of Chan Chi Kee thanks to Anthony Bourdain, but this firm's knives are nowhere near as well known: all they make is knives. Up until I decided to walk in and check them out, I had no idea their chef's knives and cleavers were made right in the neighborhood.

    This slicer is 1/8" thin with a distal taper and it is excellent quality forged carbon steel that is hand honed to a very keen edge. I've ignored the local knife culture a little too long.



    While I originally bought this one for myself, I may just carry the firm's entire line of knives (including budding knives) if there is interest in them!

  15. #15
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    Shun Kaji Santoku, Yanagiba ( I don't know the brand ), Tamahagane Pairing Knife, Masamoto Virgin Carbon Gyutou.



    Close up of my pairing knife.



    My wife's knives. The square knife is a Nikiri that my wife bought in a town close to where she if from in Japan. It is handmade using steel that is obtained locally, costs about $40 and is the sharpest knife I have ever held in my hand.

  16. #16
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    Cutlery from the Land of the Rising Sun. How does wielding that Masamoto work for you?

  17. #17
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    While I don't have much to offer here (I just use a Chicago Cutlery chef's knife - Nothing too special), I was wondering if you guys have any experience with ceramic blades? My brother is a chef and he LOVES them. He has a really nice set of them and that's all he uses. As a knife guy, I'm in love with steel, but I have to admit that my brother has piqued my interest in the subject.

    On top of that, what you would you guys recommend for a cheaper chef's knife? From the posts above it seems the Forschner Victorinox Fibrox has a lot of praise, but would the Santoku be a good too? I've always loved the more Japanese inspired kitchen knives!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blunt Forged Edge View Post
    Cutlery from the Land of the Rising Sun. How does wielding that Masamoto work for you?
    Its amazing! Super sharp, feels like cutting with a laser. I'm not used to how light it is so I still use my Shun for cutting carrots, potatoes and more robust things. It is also not stainless so I have to be careful after using it. I bought it at the Masamoto Sonhonton store in Tokyo in February along with a Yanagiba for the Chef of the restaurant that I work in. ( I work front of the house so i'm not using my knives professionally)

    I was wondering if you guys have any experience with ceramic blades?
    I've had a couple of ceramic knives and they're okay. You never have to sharpen them which is cool but they are just sharp not really really sharp like I like my knives.

    recommend for a cheaper chef's knife?
    what kind of price range were you thinking ?

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shawn7656 View Post
    While I don't have much to offer here (I just use a Chicago Cutlery chef's knife - Nothing too special), I was wondering if you guys have any experience with ceramic blades? My brother is a chef and he LOVES them. He has a really nice set of them and that's all he uses. As a knife guy, I'm in love with steel, but I have to admit that my brother has piqued my interest in the subject.

    On top of that, what you would you guys recommend for a cheaper chef's knife? From the posts above it seems the Forschner Victorinox Fibrox has a lot of praise, but would the Santoku be a good too? I've always loved the more Japanese inspired kitchen knives!
    While I have no experience with ceramic material knives, these sort of look interesting. I did happen to see one in a Damascus pattern that was at one of my local store. If you're into the Japanese style of knives and possibly in ceramic, take a look at the Kyocera Ceramics.

    Being no expert here, but in regards to the Santoku knives, they seem to be more suited for general purpose kitchen knives as opposed to the Chef's knives. Santoku has a leaning for a much straighter edge than the Chef's knife which gives it more of a "rocking" motion of cutting. Think slicing than chopping.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blunt Forged Edge View Post
    That's quite a knife you have there! Very nice.



    I believe Randy Haas said that it stands for: "Hand Made, Heavy Duty, Hunting Knives."
    Hey Im happy to hear this one is preforming well for ya! HHH Knives Is also the initials of my youngest son, who was almost 1 years old when I made my first knife. Also H being the first initial of my last name and I have 2 sons, so HHH just sorta evolved.. The Hand made Heavy duty Hunting knives fit the bill and I thought sounded pretty cool at the time when most of the knives I made were just that!

    Again thanks guys for the kind words and comments. and Thanks Kris for the update on that beautiful blade!

    I would show you my kitchen knife but its kinda embarrassing compared to some of the knives you guys are using! lol
    Last edited by HHH Knives; 06-16-2012 at 10:58 PM.
    HHH Knives, Inspired by God, Forged by Fire, Tempered by Water, Grounded by Earth & Guided by the spirit



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