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Thread: Favorite Fixed Blade for Skinning?

  1. #21
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    OK. I just checked eBay for old Sharpfingers. They have some with USA blades & China handles. Are these legit?

  2. #22
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    Not as far as collectors are concerned. Small brass rivets are a giveaway. Pallets of blade blanks have been shipped offshore for finishing. Some of them plopped into original boxes (or box copies) and claimed as legit. I just bought a new in the box sharpfinger for $36.99.



    It is an original special factory order for True Value Hardware circa 1989-91. These Sharpfinger knives were made in great quantities for many years (1974-2004), so finding a very good used or even new example isn't hard if you pay attention.
    "A knife in a mans hand is as precious as a diamond necklace on a womans neck" Felix Mirando

    As the great Andrew Martin once said "One is glad to be of service".

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by K Williams View Post
    OK. I just checked eBay for old Sharpfingers. They have some with USA blades & China handles. Are these legit?
    :Edit:
    Codger beat me to it. Thanks Mike.

  4. #24
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    This thread will help familiarize you with the many variants of Sharpfingers which are legit.
    http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/sh...OT-Sharpfinger

    But really, for a user, don't get too hung up on finding a new example. Thousands of perfectly good used ones cross the 'bay each year. Patina does not affect usability. Watch for ones that are tipped or excessively sharpened. Look at the tang markings and the handle rivet style. They were made exclusively in 1095hc steel for many years. Then in the early 2000's, they switched to stainless and a hollow grind. The 152UH, Uncle Henry variant with stag-like molded Delrin handles are always stainless.

    The imported Taylor Brands knives are easy to detect if you learn what the real ones look like. Likewise the ones made from old factory blanks.
    "A knife in a mans hand is as precious as a diamond necklace on a womans neck" Felix Mirando

    As the great Andrew Martin once said "One is glad to be of service".

  5. #25
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    If you do get an older Sharpfinger I hope to hear what you think of it. Their 1095 is an absolute dream to get and to keep sharp.

  6. #26
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    Curse you, Codger. Now I have YET ANOTHER knife to buy. **sigh**

  7. #27
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    Yeah, but it will be the best bang for the buck that you have gotten in a handy knife in a long time.

    Here is another one I found NIB a little while back. About the early 1970's on this one. Still way under $100.



    "A knife in a mans hand is as precious as a diamond necklace on a womans neck" Felix Mirando

    As the great Andrew Martin once said "One is glad to be of service".

  8. #28
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    I know, I know. And I know you're right. I've put this one off for a long time. About 20 years ago, a hunter here in CO was shot by accident, and his belt knife deflected the bullet and saved his life. It broke in two, but hey, that's pretty good all things considered. At the time, I thought it sure was a funny looking knife, now I know it was one of these. Bulletproof!

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by sodak View Post
    I know, I know. And I know you're right. I've put this one off for a long time. About 20 years ago, a hunter here in CO was shot by accident, and his belt knife deflected the bullet and saved his life. It broke in two, but hey, that's pretty good all things considered. At the time, I thought it sure was a funny looking knife, now I know it was one of these. Bulletproof!
    They do seem a little different looking at first. Once you hold one in hand, and use it, that will change.
    ______________

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    Looking for an Early Benchmade Mini Grip HG 440C Plain edge...

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by 338375 View Post
    They do seem a little different looking at first. Once you hold one in hand, and use it, that will change.
    Codger is not doing any of us favors by posting those pics of his. Mine isn't nearly as pretty as them.
    Sharpfinger is the right name for them. They feel like an extension of my hand.

  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by protourist View Post
    Codger is not doing any of us favors by posting those pics of his. Mine isn't nearly as pretty as them.
    Sharpfinger is the right name for them. They feel like an extension of my hand.
    Mama always said, "pretty is as pretty does". I assure you that my 38 year old Sharpfinger doesn't look like those new in the box examples. They are shelf queens, research material for the pattern. My original Sharpfinger is still going strong, though it is actually a little worse for wear than yours. In fact, it gutted, scaled and beheaded a nice stringer of goggleeyes and smallmouths this past weekend. Heck, for large squirrels and small elephants, in thirty years you can give it to your grandson!



  12. #32
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    I'm afraid we've drifted this thread quite a bit but, I have to ask. Why is Schrade's 1095 so user friendly? Is it the heat treat? Is the hardness why they are so easy to get laser sharp? What is it?

  13. #33
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    You know... I could have bought a few of these Sharpfingers 20 years ago, but I was more into survival and military knives at the time. Now I'm kicking myself...

  14. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by protourist View Post
    I'm afraid we've drifted this thread quite a bit but, I have to ask. Why is Schrade's 1095 so user friendly? Is it the heat treat? Is the hardness why they are so easy to get laser sharp? What is it?
    From what I have been able to gleen, it is the heat treat plus an additional step. Cryo-treatment. "Freezing" them with liquid nitrogen to even out the uneven stress in the steel. I might be wrong, but that is my best guess based upon the files.

    Quote Originally Posted by K Williams View Post
    You know... I could have bought a few of these Sharpfingers 20 years ago, but I was more into survival and military knives at the time. Now I'm kicking myself...
    You can still buy them and, considering inflation, for pretty much the same money that they cost 20 years ago.

  15. #35
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    Thanks again Mike.

  16. #36
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    It turns out that Bark River Knife & Tool did make a copy of the Sharpfinger. It's called the Fingerling.

    Wow, this thread really did seem to turn into a Sharpfinger thread. LOL

  17. #37
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    I use a Kershaw Echo. It's just about the right size, easy to clean, with a comfortable handle. In short, a great design. The AUS8 steel doesn't hold up incredibly well, but I think that may be because I use it for gutting, skinning, and boning. I think running the blade along the backbone while cutting the backstraps out chews the edge up or something. Nonetheless, I might try something in a carbon steel soon and see if it holds its edge better.

  18. #38
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    Here's my sharp finger. Along with a case and a Model 19


  19. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by protourist View Post
    Codger is not doing any of us favors by posting those pics of his. Mine isn't nearly as pretty as them.
    Sharpfinger is the right name for them. They feel like an extension of my hand.
    Yep. He has lots of cool Schrade goodies
    ______________

    Mike

    Looking for an Early Benchmade Mini Grip HG 440C Plain edge...

  20. #40
    I had Iz Turley make this knife up for me, and it works pretty well for skinning. (the leather sheath was made by cricketdave)


    However more often than not for skinning deer I actually use an Izula or Izula II to be honest. Doesn't take a ton of cutting to skin a deer out so a little knife like that works just fine.
    B. Stark


    "I'm not sure I'm smart enough to work cold fusion... On the other hand I could shovel kittens into a furnace all day long." --Anonymous

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