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Thread: Fox Parang Bushcraft, bamboo fire and friction pot hanger

  1. #1

    Fox Parang Bushcraft, bamboo fire and friction pot hanger


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    Today I want to try my Parang Bushcraft in two different skills, my purpose is to learn more on using this big knife for fine jobs.


    First of all, a bamboo fire: I need two pieces of bamboo, one roughly 10” long, the other one 15” long or more. Making the first piece:








    Now, it’s time for some bamboo tinder, I will use the remaining part of the first piece




    Now, I want two lean stakes, they will help me to stuck the tinder firmly in the first piece of bamboo



    Working now on the second piece of bamboo


    one of the side should be sharpen




    Now, working the tinder, to make it fluffy



    It’s time to making coal


    it’s matter to quickly move up and down the first piece of bamboo whit the tinder, against the sharpen edge of the second piece of bamboo…

    …until you had hot coal…

    …and if you breathe on it gently, you will had this finally




    ....to be continued

  2. #2
    Some walking…


    … and I’m ready for my second skill. I want to make a friction pot hanger:







    Let’s try it




    This way, you may set your pot at the highness that you need above the fire




    And you may also rotate at right or left side the pot, as you like



    The Fox Parang Bushcraft is a knife for heavy jobs, as batoning and cutting big woods, and fine jobs are not his cup of tea. Anyway is still possible to perform fine tasks, using it properly.
    Regards,
    Alfredo

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Great review, good pics and excellent pot holder tip! thanks

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    Good pics. I've been seeing the Fox Parangs more and more, recently.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    British Columbia-BH #95
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    Never seen a pot hanger like that, very cool! Nice post

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 1999
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    So Cal
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    Great pics and skills practice I've always liked the look of those Fox parangs, looks like a useful tool.
    /Users/tnc4evr/Desktop/thumbnail.aspx.jpg

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Great pics man, and great blade use! Nice post!

    That said...my god that blade looks chipped all to hell, what have you been chopping on, and what steel/hardness is that?
    History is a gallery of pictures in which there are few originals and many copies. ~Alexis de Tocqueville


    B.H. #27

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    Thanks for the photos and story. Always liked Fox knives.

    Quote Originally Posted by mistwalker View Post
    Great pics man, and great blade use! Nice post!

    That said...my god that blade looks chipped all to hell, what have you been chopping on, and what steel/hardness is that?
    First thing I noticed. I wind up wind small dings sometimes, though those are some serious chips. Maybe just reprofile to a more obtuse angle?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by riz_aaroni View Post
    Thanks for the photos and story. Always liked Fox knives.



    First thing I noticed. I wind up wind small dings sometimes, though those are some serious chips. Maybe just reprofile to a more obtuse angle?
    My thinking too, maybe convex the edge.
    History is a gallery of pictures in which there are few originals and many copies. ~Alexis de Tocqueville


    B.H. #27

  10. #10
    Many thanks to all of you.
    About the Fox Parang, the steel is the Bohler N690Co, HRC 58 - 60.
    I'm testing that knife (I'm the designer, so I'm interested to discover his limit and problems) since 2.5 years for all kind of jobs, including splitting an old 15 gallons metal box to do a fire reflector, as per follows. This and similar tasks are the reason for the chipping points.


























    Last edited by martineden; 06-24-2012 at 02:16 AM.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2010
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    In the forests of sweden
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    i really enjoy these posts, my local blade shop just got this in... the only thing keeping me from buying it is the lack of piercing capability, did you also design the fox trakker?

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by celebornen View Post
    i really enjoy these posts, my local blade shop just got this in... the only thing keeping me from buying it is the lack of piercing capability, did you also design the fox trakker?
    Thanks mate.
    No.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    yakima wa
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    Great review! Thanks.

    Celebornen. Piercing tasks could be performed with a smaller companion blade. Though the tip of this one appears sharp enough to open game. It's design accentuates heavier tasks.

  14. #14
    Join Date
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    Great post! That pot holder idea is slick. I also like how you ripped that can open to use as a fire reflector.
    Becker Head #94



    *Formally B.G. Leatherworks.

    Quote Originally Posted by tradewater View Post
    Zebra tested and Beckerhead approved.

  15. #15
    Love your photos and reviews

    EXCELLENT!!!!
    Siegle Knife Expert----
    If you have one you want to buy,sell or trade--contact me

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by martineden View Post
    Many thanks to all of you.
    About the Fox Parang, the steel is the Bohler N690Co, HRC 58 - 60.
    I'm testing that knife (I'm the designer, so I'm interested to discover his limit and problems) since 2.5 years for all kind of jobs, including splitting an old 15 gallons metal box to do a fire reflector, as per follows. This and similar tasks are the reason for the chipping points.
    Ah yes, now I remember this and your first post on it as well on another forum. I understand the damage now, not bad at all for all it has been through.
    History is a gallery of pictures in which there are few originals and many copies. ~Alexis de Tocqueville


    B.H. #27

  17. #17
    I have owned/used my Fox Parang for about a year and a half and find that it works very functional. Unfortunately I rarely have the opportunity to use it as my ten year old daughter has claimed it as her favourite bushcraft blade and she pairs it with my Helle Temangani.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    Ne
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    Pretty cool.
    I love the bamboo friction fire.


    I have used the type of pot hanger before also they work great.




    Bryan

  19. #19
    I have never used bamboo for a friction fire. Thanks for the photos.

  20. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by bubba5603 View Post
    I have owned/used my Fox Parang for about a year and a half and find that it works very functional. Unfortunately I rarely have the opportunity to use it as my ten year old daughter has claimed it as her favourite bushcraft blade and she pairs it with my Helle Temangani.

    Hi. A pic of your daughter with trhe knife should be welcome! :-) Enjoy!

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