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Thread: hair popping edge ?

  1. #1

    hair popping edge ?


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    Maybe it has been asked on here already, and I just dont know how to properly use the search function. I see folks talking about when they get down to the stroping, you have to becareful not to put to much preasure or youll roll the edge. I usually see this when folks are talking about hair popping or tree topping sharp. My question is... when you put all that work into a blade and get it that sharp, then have to becareful not to roll the edge when stropping, what happens when you get ready to cut a piece of rope or something like that? Maybe because I havent ever had a knife that sharp, Im dumb to the fact that it wouldnt take much preasure to cut the rope? This is a question Ive had on my mind for the last couple of days, and I just now have got the chance to ask it. Thanks for any input.

  2. #2
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    "Rolling" in the context of stropping is different. That's when, as you draw the blade, edge trailing, across the strop, if you put too much downward force you compress the leather and as the edge comes off of it it pops back up, rubs against the edge, and effectively puts an obtuse microbevel on the blade. The softer the leather the worse the effect.

    Edge rolling in the context of use is when the edge literally folds over sideways along the length of the edge in small places. Depending on the type of steel, this can often be corrected with the use of a steel or some sort of non-abrasive burnishing tool to stand that edge back up.

    Two different animals. You're pretty much only going to see the use of the term rolling over in the context of stropping in this sub-forum. Just about everywhere else on Bladeforums, folks will be talking about edge rolling as described in my second paragraph above.

  3. #3
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    By 'rolling the edge' on the strop, that's usually meant as a reference to 'rounding' or 'blunting' the edge, with repeated passes on the strop at the wrong angle, or with too much pressure applied. It's not so much about 'bending' a thin edge which, if it's thin enough to bend on the strop, it needs to come off anyway, as it won't be durable under use. In other words, one needs to minimize abrading at the wrong angle, or with too much pressure, which will produce an edge that's rounded off or blunt. Same philosophy as sharpening on the hones, but at a smaller scale.

    If finished properly on the stones and on the strop, and the thin (wire) edges have been removed, a truly sharp and cleanly-apexed edge will be much more durable than an edge which is thin enough to 'roll' (bend).

    Keep in mind, any knife's edge will gradually be dulled by use, including rope-cutting. But if the edge is in excellent shape when first starting, without the burrs & wires which can make an edge prematurely 'dull', the edge should perform well for a good while longer.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Obsessed with Edges View Post
    By 'rolling the edge' on the strop, that's usually meant as a reference to 'rounding' or 'blunting' the edge, with repeated passes on the strop at the wrong angle, or with too much pressure applied. It's not so much about 'bending' a thin edge which, if it's thin enough to bend on the strop, it needs to come off anyway, as it won't be durable under use. In other words, one needs to minimize abrading at the wrong angle, or with too much pressure, which will produce an edge that's rounded off or blunt. Same philosophy as sharpening on the hones, but at a smaller scale.

    If finished properly on the stones and on the strop, and the thin (wire) edges have been removed, a truly sharp and cleanly-apexed edge will be much more durable than an edge which is thin enough to 'roll' (bend).

    Keep in mind, any knife's edge will gradually be dulled by use, including rope-cutting. But if the edge is in excellent shape when first starting, without the burrs & wires which can make an edge prematurely 'dull', the edge should perform well for a good while longer.
    +1 He actually articulated what I was trying to say.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by HoosierQ View Post
    +1 He actually articulated what I was trying to say.
    Actually, I think your explanation said it quite well.

  6. #6
    I think both of yall put it quite well! Thank you for clearing this up for me.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    Detroit Metro Area, MI
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    There is a sticky in this forum with good pictures that cleared all questions I had about stropping right up.

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