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Thread: Four Knots contest

  1. #21
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    Maybe someone can fix the pictures for me, having some trouble getting it to work.
    Website www.RobertCarterKnives.com
    Instagram @robertcarterknives

  2. #22
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    Here you go.

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Carter View Post
    This is a inline eye splice I use as a winching point or tie off when securing barrels to hand rails or crash rail on my vessel.

    Double sheet bend for joining 2 pieces of rope

    Double bowline use for harnessing. Fully adjustable and it won't slip

    Standard eye splice. We use this mostly for 2 inch nylon ropes for mooring lines.

    Sail makers whipping. Used for securing the left over tails of the eye splice. We usually use 3/8 inch manilla rope for lashing the splice tails on 2 inch mooring lines.
    Last edited by Munky88; 09-06-2012 at 05:24 AM.

  3. #23
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    Waynesboro, TN
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    I'm in on this. Have been playing around with knots recently. Here's some for ya.

    2012-09-06 08.39.11.jpg
    Double Sheet Bend is better when the there is a bigger size difference in the two ropes.
    Prusik is used in climbing, I have one on my tree stand safety harness to dampen any fall.

    2012-09-06 08.43.50.jpg
    Bowline is used alot when a loop is needed.
    Timber Hitch is used to drag timber out. It is easy to tie and comes off easy when done.

    That Turley knife is gorgeous. Good Luck to everyone. Thanks for the GAW.

    Pat

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by mewolf1 View Post
    Good stuff right there Doc!!
    Thanks mewolf.

    Quote Originally Posted by dantzk8 View Post
    I hope so! Great video Doc. We had talked about those knots some months ago and i've played with them since. The marlin spike hitch and the toggled trucker's hitch are among the most useful knots i know. What a brain can make of a small piece of wood is amazing.

    dantzk.
    Thanks dantzk8. I'm glad you enjoyed them. When using the Trucker's Hitch, usually it is left tied for a time, so I would suggest the use of a hook stick as mentioned in the video.

    Doc

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
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    Thanks munky88 for the pics. Good luck to everyone. And thanks to. Rotte for the contest.
    Website www.RobertCarterKnives.com
    Instagram @robertcarterknives

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    Okay let me first apologise for using Camo coloured Paracord but I only decided to enter this while hiking today so used what was in my pocket !!!

    Right off the bat I'll tell you I suck at knots, I used to be pretty good and knew quite a few but over the years beer has killed off some brain cells and they must have been the ones remembering the knots !!!!


    With that said I like to keep my most used knots very simple.

    First up is the fig 8, very easy to tie and also easy to undo ~



    I use this one when making a lot of my traps.



    Second up is probably the most well know knot ever, the humble Reef knot, this knot does have it's downsides such as jamming up pretty easily but it's still a good knot to know.~



    Keep getting distracted by the views today !



    Another super simple knot but one that is very usefull is the Canadian Jam Knot, this has many uses such as cinching down a sleeping bag, down jacket etc to starting a lashing off on shelter poles and stuff.~





    And my Fourth Knot is the always popular round turn and two half hitches.~





    As I continued my hike I figured I should also mention being a fan of the Bowline as I've used it on Maisy's leash for about 10 years now !



    And a final simple one I like is the Timber Hitch.~



    Thanks for another awesome contest Rotte, it's made me realise I'm better at drinking my pee than I am at tying knots !!!

  7. #27
    Great contest idea!

    First time trying to import photos, so we'll see what happens...

    First one is a self-equalizing two-loop figure 8. Each loop will expand or contract with force so the main line stays centered. It's the only knot which will reliably self adjust.


    The second knot is a variation on the bowline. Bowline knots will slip and fail under adverse conditions, so this variation uses two loops instead of one, and the tail of the rope is passed down through the final loop in what is called a "Yosemite tie off".


    The third picture shows two knots. A triple-wrapped Prusik knot (named after Dr. Prusik, so technically it should be capitalized) connects the cordage to the main line. Each cord is tied in a grapevine knot. This particular set up is a secondary safety on a commercial rappelling station in Thailand. Tandem triple-wrapped Prusik's are the only system which is proven to capture a falling weight without damaging the main line.


    The Prusik loop is about the handiest device I know of because it allows you to easily and securely move an attachment point on a line without knotting or damaging the line. As an example, this is my hammock tie system. It's a 4mm Prusik loop on a 7mm main line. It doesn't look like much but it will easily hold two adults and their beverages without slipping, and that's with the vector force of the hammock! Once the load is released it can be adjusted anywhere on the line.

    Last edited by sutured; 09-07-2012 at 12:39 PM. Reason: link repair

  8. #28
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    sutured,

    could you show another angle of the double loop Bowline? I know that using two bights increases knot strength, and I've seen guys tie off the bitter end with a half-hitch, and I've seen double Bowlines, but I don't think I've seen the two-loop variation before. How does it work? How does one tie it? Thanks.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rotte View Post
    sutured,

    could you show another angle of the double loop Bowline? I know that using two bights increases knot strength, and I've seen guys tie off the bitter end with a half-hitch, and I've seen double Bowlines, but I don't think I've seen the two-loop variation before. How does it work? How does one tie it? Thanks.
    http://www.ropeworks.biz/reader/bowbight.pdf

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tziEo1bf9ok

  10. #30
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    Good links Pit. But I think sutured has a different knot there. He ends up with a single loop.

    Here is my 'double bowline':





    Tied this way the bowline in much stronger, i.e. less likely to snap.

    Standard with a half hitch:



    (tightened & flipped over)



    I thought maybe this was sutured's knot:





    But I'm 'knot' sure.... (sorry 'bout the bad pun, it was just sitting there...) I kinda like this one better.
    Last edited by Rotte; 09-08-2012 at 01:32 PM. Reason: spellin'

  11. #31
    Ok Rotte, here's some better pictures::

    This is a standard bowline. The knife tip is pointing at the section of knot which is "doubled":


    Here is the "doubled" loop version of the knot. It's identical to the first image in your post above:


    Notice the tail sticking up into the loop in the above photo? The Yosemite Tie-off simply takes this tail and passes it down through the bottom loop of the knot. This not only secures the tail, but it increases the radius of the final bend in the knot, thereby increasing its' strength.


    I'm very fond of this knot. It uses less rope than a figure-8, but it's much more secure than a simple bowline. Bowline's are a staple knot, but most people don't appreciate how easily they can pull through and fail.

    On another note, here is another fun knot. It goes by a variety of names, but my favorite is the Zeppelin Bend. It was so named because it was the only knot approved for attaching dirigibles to land anchors in the US Army Air Force. It's easy to untie regardless of how much force is placed on the line.

  12. #32
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    Sutured, I think we were posting the same knot at the same moment. I love the "Yosemite tie-off". Thanks.

  13. #33
    Cool contest Rotte, thanks for holding it... I am not an expert with knots but here is my entry...

    This is a monkey fist that I used to tie tow different colors of paracord together. I use this as a decorative knot on various lanyards. I think in the ole days sailors tie them on the ends of rope so they could throw them to other people.



    This is a bow knot, I tie two everyday to keep my shoes on my feet.



    I am not sure if this is a hangman's noose or a revee knot. I use these to make lanyards or loops that make need to be adjusted like a slip knot.



    Last is the bowline, my wife's grandpa would not let me on his boat until I learned to tie one. I rarely use this not...


  14. #34
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    Dec 2010
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    Thank you for the opportunity. Here's what I've got on me at the moment...

    1)first up is my keys. On them are tied a prussic knot & a weavers knot.
    The prussic I use for my ridgeline on my rainfly for my hammock. It'll slide & keep the fly taught.
    The weavers knot my mother tried to teach me for almost 30 years before i finally got it. It's downright awesom for connecting to lines together. When you buy a pair of jeans & it looks like theres a tiny knot in the thread somewhere in the material, that's a weavers knot. They ran out of thread when they made the denim & a weavers knot is used to start new thread.

    3) Bowline.
    I tied this one on a makeshift shoulder strap I made for my waterbottle. Makes a great terminal loop on any cord. I also use 'em for the stake outs on my rain fly.

    4) Surgeon's knot.
    Way back when it took skills to sew up a wound & sutures weren't absorbable, surgeons would terminate with this knot. I know i've got a lace lock on there behind it, but the lock is moot. The knot will hold better than a double knot & comes out with just a tug. I tie all my laces this way.

    5&6) boatswain whistle knot & daisy chain.
    Everybody has a paracord bracelet, but that cobra stitch they make it with won't untie easily & well, they all just look like everybody elses. I terminate my bracelets with the whistle knot. They make excellent buttons & basically are like stormdrane's celtic button knots with 2 strands. I use a daisy chain for the body of the bracelet. Same link used by electricians to wrangle their extension cords.

    7) Peter Atwood knot.
    Simple & pretty this knot is pretty self explanatory. It just looks good on a simple lanyard.
    edited to add:
    8) Oh, I forgot the Lark's head. I use it to attach lanyards to my knife apparently. LOL

    As I said, these are just the ones I've got on me, but I use 'em all regularly! Thanks again for the opportunity!

    Oh, & I don't have this one on me, but I modified a knute hitch to become my own knot. I call it a Bowman hitch. I did a thread on it a while back. It's awesome for blades with tube fasteners.

    Last edited by Bowman1911; 09-08-2012 at 08:27 PM.

  15. #35
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    I am IN on this one for sure. I loves me some Rotte contests.

    Will edit this post when done with knots and pics.

    TF

  16. #36
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    If it's still open I'm in. A not neat knot need not be tied. Give me a day. Thanks.
    This is a great idea thanks Rotte.
    I thought I might have a knot not many have seen with the zeppelin bend but Sutured beat me to it.

    The Munter hitch is what I first went rappelling with back in the Marines.

    The bowline is one of the first knots I learned and one I use alot.

    The munter hitch is good for going down. But the Prusik will get you back up( going up is a lot more work) Note: my Prusik is short by one turn it should have three

    Going up or down the figure eight follow through with a stopper knot is useful.

    The taut line hitch is one I use offten to tie gear down in my truck.

    with so many knots and some of them having more then one name it can get confusing for people to learn.
    Sorry for the poor quality photos. They looked better on my camera.
    Last edited by LG&M; 09-09-2012 at 03:09 PM. Reason: add knots

  17. #37
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    Entries accepted until 18 Sep 12. Post up 4 knots of your own efforts and you will be entered!

  18. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smokinape View Post
    This is a bow knot, I tie two everyday to keep my shoes on my feet.

    I hope you'll be able to find humour in this. You tied that knot wrong, and likely have been doing it wrong your entire life.

    http://www.ted.com/talks/terry_moore...our_shoes.html

  19. #39
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    It's the difference between a reef knot and a granny knot.

    But there is a third way.....

  20. #40
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