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Thread: Neeman Tool owners

  1. #1

    Neeman Tool owners


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    I know some of you guys have John Neeman axes. I would like to see some pics including grain orentation. And do you use them? I have a American Feller on order that should be ready in a couple of weeks. I do plan on using it, im not much on beauty queens. I have expressed that I want the grain running parallel with the bit. I just wanted to see what you guys got/requested. I am so ready to get and use this thing. Admittly, I will be real careful and never let anyone else use it. Pics and reviews are apreciated. Thanks for your time.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Erie, Pa
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    1,958
    Why would you not let anyone else use it?
    Axes4Life

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    3,680
    There are some pictures in this thread that are close to what you want and I talk about the fit of the eye compared to other makers.


    http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/sh...s-past-weekend

  4. #4
    1whobuys, how does the Neeman Feller handle?

  5. #5

    Neeman images

    I'm a long time occasional lurker here (I feel I have more knowledge to gain on knives than I have to share for instance).

    Axes though I'm a bit more familiar with.

    Though I tend to be in the "buy old and restore" camp (mostly due to economics) recently I had some "spare change" that was enough to let me purchase a few axes I've always wanted (over the past 2 years or so purchases, not all at once!). On top of the old Kelly Perfects, Snow and Neally, Sager, Collines, J.W. Warren, competition axe, and several unmarked I know have two Gransfors Bruks (American Felling (AF) and Scandinavian Forest Axe (SFA)), a Council Tool Velvicut, and a few months back ordered three tools from John Neeman Tools, including two axes - their version of the American Felling axe and their Finnish Forest Axe.

    Without a doubt the John Neeman axes are the finest I own - fit and finish was better than any I have purchased new (admittedly just the comp. ax, Gransfors Bruks, Snow and Neally, Council Velvicut, and one of the Collins). I have used the Finnish Forest axe the most (camp fires and making a lean - to) and it has stayed as sharp and polished as when I pulled it out of the box.

    I have posted a number of images and a longer critique (vs. GB mainly) up on the Bushcraft USA forum, same username.

    But to answer your question I took a few images last night, and now that my login is live (I couldn't get it to work yesterday, even after cleaning out my cache and cookies) that shows the grain orientation on my axes, and Gransfors Bruks for comparison. All are fine, and I did not request anything special for any of them.

    I do think we all get hung up on grain orientation far more than we need to. Certainly I have had a fair number of mis-hung axes in my time, and the only handles I've seen broken (or broken myself) with what we call "incorrect" grain orientation have been where they were abused (missing the tree or log and the handle impacting the wood more than the bit many times). In cases where you wish to twist the axe head (like a froe, borders on abuse in some minds) it is actually beneficial to have the grain in this orientation. But, I digress as usual. Since this forum doesn't appear to allow me to attach anything at this point please see one of the threads I've been participating in at Bushcraft USA (a search on my username or John Neeman should quickly find the others with additional images and info)
    http://bushcraftusa.com/forum/showth...hn-Neeman-Axes

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    A little here, and a little there.
    Posts
    578
    Jmh; John Neeman has a great reputation for making quality hand forged tools. I am selective about who I let borrow my tools as well, a lesson I've learned the hard way over the years.

    When your Neeman arrives, please post some pictures and opinions.

    Couch, welcome to Blade Forums. Looks like you have to be a bushcraft member to look at the images. It was a good thread over there though. To post pictures here, most people just upload their pictures on one of the free photohosting websites. I've used tinypic for a few years and have no complaints.

  7. #7
    I'd forgotten that about Bushcraft- sorry! I've been working on a lean to most of the afternoon (with the Finnish Forest axe no less..). I'll try and find a place to host images tomorrow and get them up for all of you.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SaltyLand
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    4,258
    Quote Originally Posted by jwaj View Post
    I am selective about who I let borrow my tools as well, a lesson I've learned the hard way over the years.
    I read a notion somewhere that a how your tools returned from a borrower reveals the true nature of the person, who i judged by the way how he/she received the tool(s) i lent off.
    A bit over-the-top but i do expect those who borrowed the tools respect how it was taken care off.

    I'm waiting for my Goosewing from John and Log, who are both very passionate and great people to deal with. Their new Elmax knife is hard to resist...
    MH370 &MH17, you will be remembered.

  9. #9
    I agree with all the latest posts. The reason I said I "will not let anyone else use it" is because most of my friends have no problem sinking a axe into the ground/rock or whatever. I cringe every time I see them use a axe on our camping trips. After asking John, the axes he shows that have perpendicular grain is for wall hangers not for users. From what I can tell/read Neeman axes are the cats meow. I cant wait.

  10. #10
    My own dad is the worst in the world..Phillip hides when my dads looking to borrow an axe..He splits wood on the ground and every swings sinks to the checks in the dirt..

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Erie, Pa
    Posts
    1,958
    I routinely plow my axe into the ground when splitting, limbing, chopping, etc. that's why I bought it. I then resharpen it, and then do it all over again.
    Axes4Life

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Baton Rouge, LA
    Posts
    1,417
    I've got a carpenters axe from them and couldn't be happier. The fit and Finnish is out of this world. I'll try and post some pics but I'm still rocking a 3G, and it doesn't take the best pics. You will not be dissapointed if you get one!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Appalachia, eastern,Kentucky
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    Quote Originally Posted by Operator1975 View Post
    I routinely plow my axe into the ground when splitting, limbing, chopping, etc. that's why I bought it. I then resharpen it, and then do it all over again.
    You dont resharpen an axe after Lisa's dad gets done with it, you reforge it..

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Idaho
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kentucky View Post
    You dont resharpen an axe after Lisa's dad gets done with it, you reforge it..
    LOL...Good thing you know a thing or two about forging!!!! Now let's just hope Lisa's Dad doesn't have internet...

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Erie, Pa
    Posts
    1,958
    In order to respect and meet the traditions of the axe users that came before me, I don't make the tool more "pretty" than what it is, I use it, abuse it, and expect of it, just like it does me.
    Axes4Life

  16. #16





    Here are a few pictures of the grain on my John Neeman American Felling Axe....

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    2,537
    That handle reminds me of the cheapo handles that Collins uses their POS axes these days. They cut them from super cheap flat stock, and the result is...well...super cheap. No offense intended, just an observation. A "high end" handle should always be "3 dimensional," meaning that the palm swell should swell in all directions in order to avoid hot spots, IMO. Not befitting of the price point.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SaltyLand
    Posts
    4,258
    The toughest-to-split species we used to encounter in these parts was elm; 30 years ago, there were still some of the old ones left standing -- but dying rapidly by then. Many had very tight and twisted grain; most mauls (or wedges) would just bounce back before penetrating- Peter Vido
    http://axeconnected.blogspot.com/

    From the style to selection of handle to finishes, JN co. has really done their homework.
    MH370 &MH17, you will be remembered.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    3,680
    Every one is hand shaped and hand fit to the axe head it is made for.
    Every one of my Neeman's are the best fit of all the axes I own, including my Tautahi's
    I'm pretty sure hand shaved and hand fit with hand tools they made for that job adds value, I know I appreciate it and it makes my Neeman's special to me.

    jmh76...I trimmed a 70' Old Blue Spruce up about 15' this past Sunday, the bottom branches where about 3' in diameter and the small Forest and the Bearded Axe both chopped them off clean with the trunk in two whacks.
    I haven't been able to get the Felling Axe out for a good work out yet but if it does as well as the others I'll be Very Happy.

    Quote Originally Posted by M3mphis View Post
    That handle reminds me of the cheapo handles that Collins uses their POS axes these days. They cut them from super cheap flat stock, and the result is...well...super cheap. No offense intended, just an observation. A "high end" handle should always be "3 dimensional," meaning that the palm swell should swell in all directions in order to avoid hot spots, IMO. Not befitting of the price point.

  20. #20
    I dont know about the elm that there use over there, traditional axe handle material, but I have tried to split Chineese elm. Damn, almost unsplitable.

    Well at least we can all agree that a good, well made tool just feels right in the hand and gives us the warm and fuzzies in the heart. (All personal preferance) I work with my hands everyday as a carpenter, trying my best to produce something that someone would be proud to own. And having nice tools certianly is a bonus. Seeing the passion that John and Jacob put in their products, that is what I appreciate. It seems these days people have gotten away from their passion in life. Understandibly, we all cant make a living at our passions, these two have. If left to the government, IMO, they would have us all on a powered walkway with a suit and briefcase heading to the machine. Sorry, got a little off topic...

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