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Thread: Question about sharpening

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Question about sharpening


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    Hi, I'm new to this forum and to Chris Reeve knives. I recently purchased a Umnumzaan knife with the new hex screw fastener and I would like to know the best way to keep the edge sharp. I currently have a Lansky style sharpener but have never been happy with the results it's given me on my Spyderco knife's S30V edge.

    Would this sharpening system be any good?
    http://www.knivesshipfree.com/produc...oducts_id=7184

    I am hesitant to cut anything tougher than fruits and vegetables until I get a handle on the sharpening aspect.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    I have always used the Spyderco sharpmaker. I think that is what Chris also recommends to keep them sharp.

  3. #3
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    I have looked at that one but I like the fact that you can use the one in my link out in the field. I like it's portability. If the consensus is that it is not a good one, I will look further.

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Canmore, Alberta, Canada
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    I've found that diamond hones work best for steels like S35vn which have significant amounts of very hard carbides. I freehand sharpen 99% of the time, and use an ancient Buckmaster honing guide the remaining 1%, when necessary to reset the bevel.

  5. #5
    Get a strop. Once the knife reluctantly or doesn't quite shave strop it up.

  6. #6
    The kit you linked to is meant for convex knives. It could work for v-edge ones, definitely, but a Spyderco Sharpmaker would be simpler to use and is about the same price. It's a lot better for a beginner, and the sharpening DVD that comes with it will really help you. Go with the Sharpmaker, is my recommendation.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by machine26 View Post
    Get a strop.
    The kit you linked to comes with a strop, but the Sharpmaker doesn't. It would be a good idea to get one. I'd recommend a Stropman, but if you don't want to spend the money, the back of a leather belt or the leg of a pair of blue jeans would work, too. Just not nearly as well.

  8. #8
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    Thank you for the recommendations. I will look into getting the Sharpmaker and a strop. What would you recommend for a sharpener that would be used out in the field?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
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    What I do is I set the edge (green dot) on a edge pro, once I have the edge where I want it, all I need to to for touch ups is use a strop. In the field you can roll up a small piece of leather with your compound already applied to the leather and it will fit in any small space in your pack. The key is not to let it get dull, once my edge doesnt bite, I few strops on each side will pop hair again.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by GPBob View Post
    Thank you for the recommendations. I will look into getting the Sharpmaker and a strop. What would you recommend for a sharpener that would be used out in the field?
    If you can't freehand, you're kinda out of luck when it comes to field sharpening. The Sharpmaker is pretty compact, and it would be easy to take along when traveling, but I wouldn't use it for backpacking or anything like that.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
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    Central Florida
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    5,354
    You might wish to try the DMT diamond "credit-card" sharpeners. Easy to carry in your billfold. They have a good rep; I haven't tried them.

  12. #12
    Yeah, but you have to know how to freehand in order to use them.

  13. #13
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan57 View Post
    Yeah, but you have to know how to freehand in order to use them.
    If I could give 2 pieces of advice.

    1. Put the time in to learn freehand. It is a great skill and useful when sharpening other tools as well such as shears. It is also much easier to maintain your tools. I work in remote areas, all I have is a DMT course and fine benchstone and a UF rod from Spyderco. Depending on the use influence the edge.

    2. Push the steel to its limit. Many don't go low enough to see the advantage of steels. Go as low as possible until you experience significant edge deformation through roling or chipping, then increase the angle slightly (microbevel).

  14. #14
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    I just read a number of reviews on the Spyderco Sharpmaker. While mostly good, there were a few that found the latest model not on par with the older models, ie. quality of plastic base and stones. At any rate, are there any good video or youtube presentations that are recommended on free hand sharpening?

  15. #15
    Not a video but the article that made the light bulb go off for me.

    http://www.worldknives.com/info/knif...lmadge-24.html

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by GPBob View Post
    I just read a number of reviews on the Spyderco Sharpmaker. While mostly good, there were a few that found the latest model not on par with the older models, ie. quality of plastic base and stones. At any rate, are there any good video or youtube presentations that are recommended on free hand sharpening?
    Go on YouTube and look up a guy called "jdavis882". (He goes by CrimsonTideShooter on the forums.) He has a lot of videos on sharpening.

  17. #17
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    Thank you Dan57 and machine26 and the rest of you guys.

  18. #18
    Join Date
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    Thank you Dan57 and machine26 and the rest of you guys.

  19. #19
    Hey...that strop kit is mine. We recommend it for maintaining all kinds of knives (convex to V). For more serious sharpening, I agree with the guys here that for the CRK knife, the Sharpmaker would be a great choice. The convex sharpening systems still work well, but if you want to maintain an edge similar to what came with it, they are not the way to go.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Minnesota
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    I agree with most of the other fellows, get the Spyderco product and also purchase a good strop or, better yet, make a few yourself. Make a few different sizes, some larger ones for the shop, and a few portable ones you can thrown in you trick or backpack. The cheapest strop you can use is a stout piece of cardboard or some heavy denim...

    Personally, I use a rod smooth steel even more than a leather or canvas strop. If you steel after each use, the blade will remain razor sharp, and it doesn't take but a minute or less to do. If you are quite anal (as most sharpening and knife people are), use the blade, steel the edge, than strop it as a final touch. Steels come in all sizes, but make sure you get the smooth surfaced steel rod, NOT the steel with the grooves machined in. They can be brutal in the hands of less than an experienced sharpener...

    Last word: I usually reform all my factory edged knives. I put on a nice convex edge using my shop belt sander. IMO,the convex edge is the best edge for any general purpose folding or fixed blade knife. Maintaining the edge is simple once the convex shape is in place, and the knife blade edge doesn't continually get fatter as you sharpen the blades after a few years of normal use or a few months of heavy use. A good smooth steel and a combo canvas/leather stripe is all you need to keep the knife sharp once you form the convex edge. No need to go in and take a lot more metal off the blade than necessary. Resharpening the blade suing any method removes way too much steel, IMO. It's better to reprofile the blade once and maintain the edge with a steel and strop. That's my 2 cents worth of opinion. It works for me and many others who use their blades often and somewhat hard. If you don't use a knife that often, than almost any good system will work for you. Just avoid the gimmick and electric sharpeners and you should be fine.....cya

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