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Thread: What is the most unusual axe pattern that you own?

  1. #1

    What is the most unusual axe pattern that you own?


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    Thought it be interesting to see some of the more rare and unusual axe patterns around.

    This is mine. A hoosier pattern axe from Snow & Nealley:








  2. #2
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    From another thread, the "Calabria" pattern (a couple companies in Italy still make this pattern).

    Handle can be easily removed (like a tomahawk), but the head is tapered (without the bulging eye of a tomahawk).

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Tall View Post
    Here's an axe forged in Italy by Falci Tools.
    700 gram "Calabria" model (about 1-1/2 pound head)





    The eye is made large enough that a handle can be slid in from the top (like a tomahawk handle). No wedges are used. This makes it easy to remove or install the handle, just a few thumps on a stump or chopping block should do it. If the head ever becomes slightly loose, it can be similarly tightened....



    ...

  3. #3
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    I don't guess that I really have any Coop.
    I suppose that a Puget Sound pattern would be considered unusual to 'normal' folks that aren't axe nuts and have never seen one before

  4. #4
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    I don't know what the little blue one is. It looks German to me. Only mark is weight in grams on head and [...]oss tm on the handle. Then I have a 6-pounder which I think is a Connecticut, weight and pattern both unusual around here.

    That's it 2cd from the left. It must be about 6 lb because it balances about in the middle when 6 lb barbell disc is hanging from handle end.
    Last edited by scrteened porch; 10-11-2012 at 08:42 AM. Reason: sp

  5. #5
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    I'm going to have to beg off as a traditionalist....Like Bear, my Puget Sound and maybe a 5Lb Plumb Dayton are my only out of the norm axes. I have 130+ total so I'm pretty mainstream.

    Tom
    Double Ott aka; Tom; TC

    Vintage PUMAs from the 1970's & 1980's.. Let me know what you have, Thanks

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Tall View Post
    From another thread, the "Calabria" pattern (a couple companies in Italy still make this pattern).

    Handle can be easily removed (like a tomahawk), but the head is tapered (without the bulging eye of a tomahawk).
    Same here. Cool axe and I still need to finish carving the hickory handle upgrade for it. If memory serves correctly Falci also makes a model with a hammer poll. Would make a great alternative to a 'hawk in the woods.


    Baryonyx Knife Co. ~Condors, Moras, Deluxe Tramontinas, and More!

    "To live at all is miracle enough."
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Tall View Post
    From another thread, the "Calabria" pattern (a couple companies in Italy still make this pattern).

    Handle can be easily removed (like a tomahawk), but the head is tapered (without the bulging eye of a tomahawk).
    That is really cool. I should start to keep some of the axe heads that I find in fields. Most are just turn of the century though. I usually find them with a bit of rotted wood and square head nails in them.

  8. #8
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    I think my most unusual axe patterns are my hewing tools. Most axes are made for chopping and/or splitting wood. These tools have a completely different purpose.

    Central to my hewing tools is my broad axe. I've posted pictures here before but I'll repost one image for this thread.




    Another important hewing tool is my carpenters adze. This is an old True Temper with it's original handle. It's very handy for finishing a surface.




    One of my favorite hewing tools is my Stubai of Austria broad hatchet. I use it for hewing but it sees more use as a 'stump axe', a tool used atop the stump for shaping wood.



    It has a claw for extracting nails. It also has an offset handle and a slightly turned bit to save you from 'barking your knuckles' when hewing a timber. The cheeks are relatively thin.




    My most valued hewing tool is an old railroad broad hatchet that was recently gifted to me by my friend Operator. It's a True Temper Flint Edge with a Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific Rail Road stamp. This railroad used to run through my home town of Maple Valley and the old rail bed has been converted into a regional trail (a rails-to-trails project). This is part of my small but growing collection of CMStP&P railroad tools. Eventually this collection will be donated to the local historical museum. I can't thank Operator enough for donating this to the collection.


  9. #9
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    One more note about Stubai. If you haven't seen their line of forestry tools then you might want to give them a look.

    http://www.stubai.com/seiten_englisc...-forst-eng.htm
    Last edited by Square_peg; 10-11-2012 at 10:07 PM.

  10. #10
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    Nice write up Pegs!
    I'll keep my eyes open for tools with that stamp.
    You never know, something might show up around these parts

  11. #11
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    Anything for you Pegs! It is going to a great collector, collection, and purpose. And besides, I love given axes away to put a good smile on guys faces.
    Axes4Life

  12. #12
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    Hey Squarepeg,

    search "vintage true temper kelly works brush axe with handle stamped CMSTP&PRR" on the flea bay. One just popped up.

  13. #13
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    Some axes my Mom brought back from Pakistan in the 60's. Probably tourist pieces, but they have a nice surprise at the end of the handle! I think they're some type of battle axe.



    Josh

  14. #14
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    Thanks for the tip, Crazy.

    I actually have a CMSTP&PRR brush axe but it wouldn't hurt to have another.




    Almost forgot, I have a TT Kelly Works brush axe, too. But I don't have both stamps on one axe.


  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Square_peg View Post
    Thanks for the tip, Crazy.

    I actually have a CMSTP&PRR brush axe but it wouldn't hurt to have another.




    Almost forgot, I have a TT Kelly Works brush axe, too. But I don't have both stamps on one axe.

    Hey Peg, Here's one for you to check out.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/300794335151...84.m1438.l2648

    Just thought you may be interested.

    Tom
    Double Ott aka; Tom; TC

    Vintage PUMAs from the 1970's & 1980's.. Let me know what you have, Thanks

  16. #16
    I like the brush axes that Collins put out, too.


    Baryonyx Knife Co. ~Condors, Moras, Deluxe Tramontinas, and More!

    "To live at all is miracle enough."
    — Mervyn Peake

  17. #17
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    Thanks FortyTwo! I forgot I jammed one under the seat of my father's truck, um, 6 months ago?

  18. #18
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    Beatty broad hewing axe


    Does a pickaroon count?


    Wall hangers

  19. #19
    Bavarian pattern with hardened poll


    Japanese hewer



    I think these are called "boarding" axes

  20. #20
    double bit with levers


    euro hewing axes


    maul with raised area on one side

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