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Thread: Busse knives really worth the bux ?

  1. #321
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    Quote Originally Posted by FortyTwoBlades View Post
    It's very important to have a feel for the limits of a tool, which requires careful "listening" to it while in use. If you're in tune with it enough you'll know exactly how far it wants to be pushed without damage. That's just as much an acquired skill as sharpening is, though, and takes practice. Some folks instinctually "get it" and others have to put a lot of effort into getting the knack for it.
    I agree, but sometimes mistakes are made and knives break. Maybe when you're hungry or fatigued. At those times, I'd like to have a knife that is over-built.

    How much over-built... 10%, 37.5%, 100%? I suppose that's the more interesting question.

    Maybe a knife that's too over-built will cause you to become fatigued earlier... hmmm...

  2. #322
    Quote Originally Posted by Nullity View Post
    I agree, but sometimes mistakes are made and knives break. Maybe when you're hungry or fatigued. At those times, I'd like to have a knife that is over-built.

    How much over-built... 10%, 37.5%, 100%? I suppose that's the more interesting question.

    Maybe a knife that's too over-built will cause you to become fatigued earlier... hmmm...
    Precisely. I think that when selecting a tool for percussive use that you should imagine as though about 10-15% more strain will be placed on the tool than you expect under normal conditions to account for circumstances like that. Just don't select a tool that can't take a reasonable margin of force above your expected potential tasks. Typically that reduces the performance of the tool only very slightly from the theoretical "ideal" but gives you a little insurance as well. Fatigue makes smart people do dumb things, so also try to pace yourself whenever possible so you make good decisions and avoid situations where you might make bad ones.

    Plan for the unexpected, but in the wise words mentioned earlier in the thread, try to avoid "loading up on the improbable at a cost to what's optimal."
    Last edited by FortyTwoBlades; 11-02-2012 at 12:46 PM.


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  3. #323
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nullity View Post
    I agree, but sometimes mistakes are made and knives break. Maybe when you're hungry or fatigued. At those times, I'd like to have a knife that is over-built.

    How much over-built... 10%, 37.5%, 100%? I suppose that's the more interesting question.

    Maybe a knife that's too over-built will cause you to become fatigued earlier... hmmm...
    Mistakes do happen and knives do break this is true. It is also true that most knives made today are a much better quality than those made say 30 years ago. I mean my little ESEE 3 is nothing when laid down next to a Busse Steel Heart but I have put that little 1095 machine threw its paces and it has never failed me. Will it take the same abuse as a Steel Heart lord no it wont but it will however take anything I can personally see me ever pushing it threw.

    I think overbuilt is fine but before making a purchase the buyer needs to decide for his needs what over built is and then base his purchase on his own personal needs.

  4. #324
    Quote Originally Posted by PatrickKnight View Post
    Mistakes do happen and knives do break this is true. It is also true that most knives made today are a much better quality than those made say 30 years ago. I mean my little ESEE 3 is nothing when laid down next to a Busse Steel Heart but I have put that little 1095 machine threw its paces and it has never failed me. Will it take the same abuse as a Steel Heart lord no it wont but it will however take anything I can personally see me ever pushing it threw.

    I think overbuilt is fine but before making a purchase the buyer needs to decide for his needs what over built is and then base his purchase on his own personal needs.
    Quoted for truth.


    Baryonyx Knife Co. ~Condors, Moras, Deluxe Tramontinas, and More!

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  5. #325
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    I had a new bussekin show up today and I'm thoroughly impressed. 42blades you might even appreciate it. the scrap yard 1311. it's very machete like in sr101 and chops like a machine.

    I guess I can post my review here also for anyone who missed it.


    First things first. These things are freaking monsters!!!!! I am throughly impressed. what a steal of a deal for under $200 dollars. Not sure if anyone has done a review over here or not. I know I'm no Horn Dog but figured I would give everyone my initial impressions. they are worth about what they cost you

    Specs*

    Overall Length: 18.25"
    Blade Length: 13.5"
    Thickness: 3/16"
    Blade Width: 1.75"
    Steel: SR-101 / 58-60 Rc
    Handle: Resiprene C
    Finish: Black
    Grind: Saber

    and on to the pics compared to a busse B-11





    Spine Shot comparison. the 1311 is a tad bit thinner!



    Chopping through some very hard seasoned black walnut



    compared to the B11. It took literally twice as many swings to get to about the same depth with the B11. The 1311 is a monster.




    And how deep do they bite into some seasoned maple
    B11 first! pretty dang nice.



    And on to the beast 1311!!! holy crap look at this!




    and there was much more beating and testing that took place but my phone has no memory so the pictures are limited lol. I will say this. this thing soars through green wood up to about 1.5 inches thick like it's nothing. literally the first 3 slices of it went straight through the first branch and dead into my metal fence. no blade damage so that was good. me being the smart guy I am it took me 3 times to figure it out. So I changed the angle of the dangle so I would miss the fence but this thing would not only go through the branch your trying to cut but also the one underneath it. pretty amazing heavy duty machete if you ask me.

    So after all the beatings, hitting the fence and stuff your asking how was the edge retention right? well me too and as with most all bussekin knives it was superb. it wasn't shaving super smooth but it was still taking the hair off w/ minor pulling instead of the effortlessness. and it sliced paper like it hadn't been used

    It's touchier than a Vatican summer camp in here-Expatriated
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  6. #326
    Isn't Resiprene C a rubber material? I find rubber tends to cause horrible rubbing/chafing if you use a machete-style pinch grip and chop for more than a half hour straight. Doesn't look like a bad piece of work though. Now just make it 18", drop the spine thickness to 1.8" and give it a slight flare.


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  7. #327
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    res c is a rubber like material but I have found it to be some of the most comfortable handle material out there. I have chopped and used one well over a hour and never had any chaffing. It's extremely shock absorbing and comfortable. I would take it a bit thinner but 13 inches is plenty for me

    42 your a size queen
    It's touchier than a Vatican summer camp in here-Expatriated
    Proud supporter of hard use knives
    Busse Combat, --- Oink soldier
    Horton Knives-- built for bad times
    Jk knives - your design or his.

  8. #328
    Are you using a pinch grip like with a machete or are you holding it like a knife? Rubber is fine when holding/using a chopper like a knife, but the pivoting action of using a pinch grip is what causes the rubbing.

    And yes--I like my 'chetes big. Long machetes take a bit of getting used to for most folks, but the advantage of reach is tremendous on multiple levels.


    Baryonyx Knife Co. ~Condors, Moras, Deluxe Tramontinas, and More!

    "To live at all is miracle enough."
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  9. #329
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    I would jump all over a 1311 if it was 1/8th inch thick and didnt have res-c handles. I know a bunch of people love the res-c handles but to me they just feel I dont know cheap? That is in no way a knock on them its just the only way I can discribe it. I would personally never purchase a knife with those handles on them. I really wish the Yard would do some micarta grips.

  10. #330
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    Quote Originally Posted by FortyTwoBlades View Post
    Isn't Resiprene C a rubber material? I find rubber tends to cause horrible rubbing/chafing if you use a machete-style pinch grip and chop for more than a half hour straight. Doesn't look like a bad piece of work though. Now just make it 18", drop the spine thickness to 1.8" and give it a slight flare.
    Wearing out your hands? Sounds like a personal problem.
    Stop giving the handle the "floppy fish" and grasp it like a man.

    Oh, and if you get chafing when using the grip in a certain way... don't use it that way.

  11. #331
    Quote Originally Posted by Nullity View Post
    Wearing out your hands? Sounds like a personal problem.
    Stop giving the handle the "floppy fish" and grasp it like a man.

    Oh, and if you get chafing when using the grip in a certain way... don't use it that way.
    A pinch grip is the way a machete is supposed to be used, and DRASTICALLY improves the performance of machetes and similar tools. It would be silly to swing a machete or machete-like tool in a way that did not make the most of its abilities, let alone for long periods. If a machete-like tool has a handle that prevents it from being used right...I'll buy another tool

    Also, I have well-calloused hands (having a hobby farm goes a long way there) and the handshake of a fast-tracker. No floppy fish here.


    Baryonyx Knife Co. ~Condors, Moras, Deluxe Tramontinas, and More!

    "To live at all is miracle enough."
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  12. #332
    Here's a very good li'l primer video by the incomparable Joe Flowers on the subject.



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  13. #333
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    Quote Originally Posted by FortyTwoBlades View Post
    A pinch grip is the way a machete is supposed to be used, and DRASTICALLY improves the performance of machetes and similar tools. It would be silly to swing a machete or machete-like tool in a way that did not make the most of its abilities, let alone for long periods. If a machete-like tool has a handle that prevents it from being used right...I'll buy another tool

    Also, I have well-calloused hands (having a hobby farm goes a long way there) and the handshake of a fast-tracker. No floppy fish here.
    Similar tools, like an axe, hatchet, or hammer? Because I grip a machete exactly the same way I use an axe, and I'm pretty sure it's not a pinch-grip.
    Anyway, it's what works for me, and pinch-grip seems to work for you. To each their own.

    I was only joking about your lady hands.

  14. #334
    Quote Originally Posted by Nullity View Post
    Similar tools, like an axe, hatchet, or hammer? Because I grip a machete exactly the same way I use an axe, and I'm pretty sure it's not a pinch-grip.
    Anyway, it's what works for me, and pinch-grip seems to work for you. To each their own.

    I was only joking about your lady hands.
    Nope. Not like an axe or hammer. Probably the most comparable thing would be a drum stick or a fencing sabre. It's a rolling snap of the wrist, extension of the arm, and a squeezing or clutching action of the fingers that "casts" the mass of point at the target. You're fighting the tool if you use it like an axe. It'll still cut stuff, but it's not nearly as efficient. I swing an axe like an axe, a hammer like a hammer, and a machete like a machete. By machete-like I meant other similar chopping tools, like billhooks, very long chopping knives, etc.

    And hey--I didn't say I didn't have lady hands! I take a lady's size 8 glove! It's kind of a pain trying to find work gloves that fit off the rack--most places only carry L and XL! Forget about small or medium!


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  15. #335
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    Quote Originally Posted by FortyTwoBlades View Post
    Nope. Not like an axe or hammer. Probably the most comparable thing would be a drum stick or a fencing sabre. You're fighting the tool if you use it like an axe. It'll still cut stuff, but it's not nearly as efficient. I swing an axe like an axe, a hammer like a hammer, and a machete like a machete. By machete-like I meant other similar chopping tools, like billhooks, very long chopping knives, etc.

    And hey--I didn't say I didn't have lady hands! I take a lady's size 8 glove! It's kind of a pain trying to find work gloves that fit off the rack--most places only carry L and XL! Forget about small or medium!
    You say a rubber handle will ruin your hand when using a pinch-grip, and that the pinch-grip is the best grip for a machete.
    I just wanted to say there's more than one way to skin a cat.

    I think both grips have their use, but when chopping through light vegitation, like vines or bushes, a pinch-grip is more dangerous. (in my experience)
    I've never been a fan of loosely holding any heavy, dangerous tool.

    All of my machetes are heavier than a drum-stick, by a lot.

  16. #336
    A pinch grip may be loose, but the handle is not held loosely--it should be quite secure in the hand and the travel of the blade should be anticipated. The pinch grip, in my opinion, especially comes in handy on light targets since it generates exceptionally high tip velocity, which greatly assists with executing cuts on light and flexible materials. Just my experience. I definitely agree that there's more than one way to skin a cat, but there are also definitely ways that are faster or easier or neater than others, if I may run with the analogy a little.

    I'd have to actually take one for a spin before dismissing it entirely, but at the moment the Resiprene C handles on the 1311 are a turnoff based on my previous experiences with machete-like choppers with rubbery handles.


    Baryonyx Knife Co. ~Condors, Moras, Deluxe Tramontinas, and More!

    "To live at all is miracle enough."
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  17. #337
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    Quote Originally Posted by FortyTwoBlades View Post
    A pinch grip may be loose, but the handle is not held loosely--it should be quite secure in the hand and the travel of the blade should be anticipated. The pinch grip, in my opinion, especially comes in handy on light targets since it generates exceptionally high tip velocity, which greatly assists with executing cuts on light and flexible materials. Just my experience. I definitely agree that there's more than one way to skin a cat, but there are also definitely ways that are faster or easier or neater than others, if I may run with the analogy a little.

    I'd have to actually take one for a spin before dismissing it entirely, but at the moment the Resiprene C handles on the 1311 are a turnoff based on my previous experiences with machete-like choppers with rubbery handles.
    You could always spray down the rubber handle with silicone to take away some of the grippyness. Don't forget to yell "fore"...

  18. #338
    LOL I'll pass on that, I think! I just find that more solid materials work better for machete handles, like polypropylene, wood, or micarta.


    Baryonyx Knife Co. ~Condors, Moras, Deluxe Tramontinas, and More!

    "To live at all is miracle enough."
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  19. #339
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    Fehrman has a very eloquent solution to the issue of shock and vibration through the micarta by introducing a rubber spacer between the handle slabs.

    There is a noticeable difference in the feel between my Steel Heart E handle and my Fehrman First Strike (nearly identical dimensions) when chopping hard wood.

    My technique for chopping is very much like those that use the Khukri, a wrist snap. I normally only hold the handle with my first two fingers and relaxed hold on the other two. Its hard to explain, but second nature to those familiar with blunt weapon arts. So yea, I'm probably doing it all kinds of wrong.
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  20. #340
    Sounds like a pinch grip to me.


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