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Bench stone Soaking Up Oil

Discussion in 'Maintenance, Tinkering & Embellishment' started by Bighaze51, Jan 2, 2014.

  1. Bighaze51

    Bighaze51

    Dec 26, 2012
    Hey guys, I've got a cheap two sided Gator bench stone from the hardware store that I want to use for reprofiling. It says to use oil for lubrication but when I pour some on it just soaks right in. I know on my old Arkansas stones it actually pools on top but not on this one. I guess my question is, do I keep loading it with oil until it stops soaking in? I've never really used this type of stone ( silicon carbide) so I don't want it to fall apart or become ineffective because I put too much oil on it
     
  2. Some here have apparently used Vaseline or equivalent petroleum jelly to pre-treat very porous stones like you're describing. I have a couple of inexpensive SiC stones that behave like yours. I haven't tried it, but with the Vaseline, it's said to slow down the continuous soaking up & draining of oil from stones like these.


    David
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2014
  3. Bighaze51

    Bighaze51

    Dec 26, 2012
    Oh, I didn't think of that. I will definitely try it. Thanks, David!
     
  4. StevieWunders

    StevieWunders

    93
    Mar 9, 2012
    I think HeavyHanded has mentioned this before, but I don't remember seeing any details. Perhaps none are needed, but I'm OCD like much of the population here, so I have a couple, if anybody has answers. Is this just a rub-on, wipe-off procedure, or would low heat be used to "cook" in the jelly( as in, filling it through and through)? FWIW, I have a couple of no-name SiC stones that are terrific grinders, but were not pre-filled with oil. With my usual tunnel-vision, I filled one up with mineral oil to try to satisfy its insatiable appetite for petroleum products. Predictably (to anyone but me), the mineral oil proceeds to bleed out the lower side and create an enormous mess that is not met with approval in OUR kitchen. Apparently, some sort of sealant would be in order.:rolleyes:
     
  5. HH did mention it in another thread (see below). I guess it's just a matter of wiping it on, though it'd be interesting to see if warming it would help to more thoroughly infuse the Vaseline into the stone. There's also a suggestion in the thread to just use these porous stones like waterstones (with water). I've used mine like that a time or two (with dish soap + water, over a sink filled with same), and it works pretty well. I just 'dunked' the stone periodically in the sink, to rinse off swarf and re-wet it. Also greatly simplifies cleanup afterwards.

    (Below text quoted from --> http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/showthread.php/1054374-SiC-stone-help-opinions-and-theories-thread )

    David
     
  6. HeavyHanded

    HeavyHanded KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jun 4, 2010

    That's pretty much it, just use a fairly small amount of Vaseline or similar. No need to go overboard, if it doesn't work at first, use a bit more. Rub it in good with a fingertip so its not on the surface, and as you apply oil (I use mineral oil and it reacts very well with petroleum jelly and the whatever Norton uses to pre-load their stones) it will stay more or less right on the surface. Over time it seems to draw the vaseline out and an occasional re-application might be needed few and far between.

    I have experimented with using a hot air gun to drive it into the stone, and that's exactly what happened - drove into the stone and didn't help with the surface action. When you compare a Norton India stone out of the box to one that's had the oil boiled out of it, easy to see the lube is right there, visible just beneath the top layer of abrasive. A boiled one has pores and voids that go right down into the stone. My opinion is that the pre-lubet not only helps the oil stay on the surface better, but also "plugs" the voids in the stone so debris doesn't penetrate either.

    Have noticed that as a vitreous stone gets into the real coarse range maybe 80 grit or lower depending, a lube isn't really needed. The abrasive grains are so large they fracture or tear out fairly easily as they wear, and the stone is so open it doesn't load up either. Just rinse under water when done and let dry, and even that might be optional in most cases. Also helps to move around the stone so it doesn't dish or develop a different feel from one spot to the next.
     
  7. Skimo

    Skimo

    Mar 28, 2009
    I mount my SiC stones over the sink and keep a small stream of water running on the stone from the faucet, I'm not an oil stone kinda guy.

    I use the stones for the heavy grinding and tip repairs.
     
  8. Bighaze51

    Bighaze51

    Dec 26, 2012
    Thanks for the info guys. I found a great solution. I went to Harbor Frieght and found a diamond grit hone for $10. It's a four sided block with 200, 300, 400, and 600 grit. I'm happy now. I reprofiled my spyderco native in s30v in no time flat. :)
     
  9. StevieWunders

    StevieWunders

    93
    Mar 9, 2012
    I'd be interested in hearing how those HF diamonds hold up, Bighaze. I snagged a couple of those in case I needed to smooth out some Arkansas stones that I need to flatten (with much lower grit).
    David and Martin, thanks for the information. I much prefer to ask than to clean up my mistakes. Guess I'll go rub some Vaseline into my stones. It even SOUNDS like fun...
     
  10. Omega Leather Works

    Omega Leather Works

    Jun 13, 2007
    I have a few of the HF blocks. They hold up very well. I've done things with them that I'd never do with a DMT or other high end diamond plate. They are quite rough at first (like others), and I could see an uninitiated user thinking they lost their abrasive after they smooth out but mine cut very well. I've had the first one I bought for several years. I do believe that they've changed a little over the years, but I find the new ones to be just as good. The one problem is that the plates aren't flat. I don't mean that they are warped, more likely the process for punching out the swarf holes have distorted the steel and the nickel + diamond isn't enough to overcome the wavy surface. Doesn't seem to make much of an impact on normal sharpening. For a hobbyist sharpener it might be too much. The finish achieved by the "fine" side is not very refined unless you like a lot of tooth. Overall, I think it's a great pickup for the price.

    I have mentioned a few times how much I like Martins method for stopping the absorption of mineral oil on my Norton SiC. What I do is rub a thin layer on the surface then hover the stone over the flame on the stove top just for a second. The petroleum jelly turns to liquid seeps into the surface then turns back to its regular state. As HH points out, the oil and jelly mingle just fine. My stone seemed nearly unusable as it would soak (and then bleed) a ridiculous quantity of oil.
     
  11. David Martin

    David Martin

    Apr 7, 2008
    On one of my India stones I didn't care for the grease and boiled the stone in H2o to remove it. This was a 2006 mfg. India stone (Hecho en Mexico). Afterward it did seep yet, I have a holder for it and it has a reservoir which catches the oil and thus can be reused. Hence, no mess. My older India stones (1980 mfg.in USA) don't seep and had no grease. So, some things changed at St. Gobain. DM
     
  12. HeavyHanded

    HeavyHanded KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jun 4, 2010
    Please...no pics....sweet Heaven, no pics...:eek:
     
  13. Omega Leather Works

    Omega Leather Works

    Jun 13, 2007
    Bwahaha...
     
  14. Umm, glad I could help, I think...
    :D

    I'll 2nd that emotion...


    David
     

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