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Browning knife - anyone got one?

Discussion in 'General Knife Discussion' started by Clydetz, Apr 20, 2003.

  1. Clydetz

    Clydetz

    Dec 1, 2001
    Just been wasting some time checking out some sites & came across 2 Browning knives that looked interesting but don't know anything about Browning, other than they make guns. The 2 models I liked were BR817, a 5" closed, Trailing Point lockback & BR377, 7" OAL Presentation Snakewood Fixed blade. Anyone here have one? If so, how is the quality? I'm assuming Browning knives are made in the US? Thanks for any input!
     
  2. nifrand

    nifrand Custom Knife Forum Mod

    Feb 25, 1999
    I have a Browning Mod.102 that I received as a gift. Seems to be a well made lockback. It says it is made in Japan on the blade.
    Randy
     
  3. JERRY SHIPMAN

    JERRY SHIPMAN

    398
    Jul 4, 2001
    They are all made in Japan . I own three brownings - Md.726 lockback, the bigger brother to it ( the model escapes me ) , and a presentation fixed blade . Well made knives for the money . I carry the 726 everyday , it is a well made and size effective knife .
     
  4. wolfmann601

    wolfmann601 Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 12, 2001
    I have one that says: "Made in the USA".

    What's up with that??????????
     
  5. Clydetz

    Clydetz

    Dec 1, 2001
    Hey, thanks for the info! I've done a little more searching & didn't find Japan or the US associated with the knives but did find Germany. I guess it all depends on the Model No.!
     
  6. frank k

    frank k

    May 8, 2001
  7. JERRY SHIPMAN

    JERRY SHIPMAN

    398
    Jul 4, 2001
    Wolfman ,

    You must have an old model ( keep it) . I read an article somewhere that said all models were Japan produced now . I will try to find it .

    Anyway a good user knife, or so mine have been.
     
  8. steve1701d

    steve1701d

    684
    Dec 21, 2000
    I have three, all the Featherlite models. One lockback, one mini-trapper, and one drop-point fixed-blade, all very good knives. Mine all have AUS8 steel, I believe, and take and hold a great edge. Kinda hard to sharpen without using a medium Arkansas or a diamond stone.
    I have seen older German made ones, but all mine are made in Japan.
     
  9. Clydetz

    Clydetz

    Dec 1, 2001
    Well, no negative responses does it for me; looks like I'm getting a Browning. Ahhh! What the heck, I got a little tax refund money left, I'll get both of 'em.
    frank k - I like the looks of your 520 stag handled trapper! I'll try & check that model out or something similiar. Looks like a nice EDC!
     
  10. sophijo

    sophijo

    75
    Mar 10, 2003
    Just an aside....I have several Browing shotguns (same company?) parts made in Japan, assembled in Korea! Great guns!
     
  11. SPHayes

    SPHayes

    445
    Nov 8, 2002
    I bought my father in law a small Browning Stockman. A very nice knife. I would prchase another of their blades.
     
  12. Danbo

    Danbo Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Nov 28, 1999
    Another positive vote for the Browning knives. Great quality, with reasonable prices too. Another plus is that you can still find them with good looking stag handles.
     
  13. frank k

    frank k

    May 8, 2001



    The 520 is a nice pocket knife! I really like the materials: AUS 8 steel, nickel silver bolsters and stag scales. Workmanship is first rate for a production knife. About the only thing I didn’t like was that a couple of the pins had sharp edges which could be felt due to the contours of the stag.



    - Frank
     
  14. TDE

    TDE

    Jan 17, 2003
    W get a shipment every once and ahile, they are nice. Love the Ice storm! Paul
     
  15. wolfmann601

    wolfmann601 Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 12, 2001
    What's the history on those Brownings that are stamped "USA"?

    Thanks..........
     
  16. bob bowie

    bob bowie

    Jul 24, 2001
    Hi,

    Here is a short Browning history.

    Late 60's- A line of Gil Hibben style hunters, and a folding 110 style knife.

    Early 70's- Kabar contracted pocket knives.

    The Kabar contract was dropped, and a series of U.S., German, and Japanese firms take over.

    The Brownings are high quality knives, they have some of the nicest:) stag I've ever seen on a production knife.

    The U.S. and German models are kinda rare, and pretty costly.
     
  17. wolfmann601

    wolfmann601 Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 12, 2001
    Thanks for the info BoB..............;)
     
  18. Clydetz

    Clydetz

    Dec 1, 2001
    Based on the overwhelming positive responses to Browning knives and especially responses by some of the forumites I've grown to respect, I ordered a Browning Featherweight Folder Model 825 (instead of the larger Model 817) and a small Presentation Fixed blade in Snakewood Model 377. Loved the Stag Folding Skinner Model 509 but couldn't find one in my price range. There's always tomorrow! :D Thanks again for your help!
     
  19. Danbo

    Danbo Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Nov 28, 1999
    It's probably for the best that you didnt find a stag one in your price range. It's been my experience(especially lately)that stag handled knives need to be bought from somewhere that you are able to hand pick them personally. Too many knives are being sold with stag that doesnt match in either color or thickness. Bass Pro Shops carry Browning stag knives.
     
  20. steve1701d

    steve1701d

    684
    Dec 21, 2000
    That 825 is a great knife; I have one, too. Cut myself pretty good on it cutting staghorn sumac horns a few years ago, was sharper than I thought! Sort of a pukka shape when opened, with no finger grooves or anything like that, so be carefull when stabbing things. Mine is my outdoor carry when I don't want to carry something heavy or bulky.
     

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