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Cruiser Axe - Your Definition?

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by Operator1975, Feb 26, 2012.

  1. Operator1975

    Operator1975

    Sep 24, 2010
    Thought I would ask this question, seeing I have been getting a lot of mixed feedback from various sources and people.

    To you, what is a "cruiser axe" ?? Size, dimensions, etc. I have my own idea of what it is, but like I said, I would be interested to see what people have to say.

    Thanks!
     
  2. M3mphis

    M3mphis

    Jan 13, 2011
    I always use it to refer to a small (2-2.5ish pound) double bit axe. I've been noticing people also referring to 2 pound single bits as cruisers. I would call them boy's axes.
     
  3. cattledog

    cattledog

    319
    Oct 7, 2011
    I agree with M3.

    I'm a layman though in the axe world.
    The author of the Ax book mentions the tomahawk pattern "variously known as a cruising, trappers or Hudson Bay" ax.
     
  4. Broady

    Broady

    170
    Jan 15, 2011
    M3mphis has my vote...
     
  5. Sidehill Gouger

    Sidehill Gouger

    Dec 29, 2007
    Someplace in the past I read the Cruiser pattern was favored by timber cruisers but when I worked on a U.S. Forest Service timber cruising crew, we used single bit boy's axes. The poll was good for sounding a trunk to see if it might be hollow.
     
  6. M3mphis

    M3mphis

    Jan 13, 2011
    That's just how I use the term. I have no idea what is "technically correct."
     
  7. Broady

    Broady

    170
    Jan 15, 2011
    Not to get the thread sidetracked, but what is the most highly regarded working axe within the USFS?
     
  8. Sidehill Gouger

    Sidehill Gouger

    Dec 29, 2007
    I'm years out of date on the U.S Forest Service but I don't remember anyone really worrying about it. We just used whatever was in the issue fire tool box. Double bit swampers and Pulaskies most of the time. The boys axes we used for cruising were an exception.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2012
  9. Section10

    Section10

    114
    Jun 8, 2010
    M3mphis described it. Although I think if I was a timber cruiser, I'd prefer a single bit.
     
  10. trailmaker

    trailmaker

    506
    May 15, 2011
    What exactly is "timber cruising"? I hear the term used most often to describe 2.5 lb double bits on 28in handles.
     
  11. Section10

    Section10

    114
    Jun 8, 2010
    A timber cruiser is a scout. He's the guy who goes onto a parcel of land and determines how much merchanable timber is there. The board feet of the various species. This gives the potential buyer an idea of how much he should bid on the stumpage or standing timber. The cruiser does not mark the timber to be cut, but just figures out what is actually there.
     
  12. bearhunter

    bearhunter

    Sep 12, 2009
    your right, but it depends. cruisers sometimes do mark the trees, at least around here...
    when i was in forestry school we would do 'mock' timber sales we would cruise a plot and also mark the trees to be felled at the same time... i just think it depends on the region or possibly even the company or gov. agency...
    the proff. that had us do this was also a employee of a very large timber company (plump creek), he only taught part time...
     
  13. Section10

    Section10

    114
    Jun 8, 2010
    In my experience, if it is a marked sale, the foresters marked the trees. Of course that may vary as you say. They'd mark at breast height and low on the stump. Spray paint has made that job a lot easier now.
     
  14. bearhunter

    bearhunter

    Sep 12, 2009
    yeah, we marked the trees with flagging tape since they were mock sales... plus this was just for a class, so he may have been trying to 'kill two birds with one stone' doing both at the same time... ive never done it professionally...

    but back to the OP; for me the def. of a 'crusier' axe is a DB 2-2 1/2lb on a 28-30" haft...
    i generally dont consider a single bit as a crusing axe, as memphis said i consider an SB axe of similar size a 'boys axe'...
    not to say that a SB cant be called a crusier i just dont think of it that way...

    so, basically what memphis said...:D

    it also could be a regional thing as well...
     
  15. Section10

    Section10

    114
    Jun 8, 2010
    A good friend of mine's father was an old time cruiser. He'd camp right in the woods for several days alone and work on very large tracts of land. It was a difficult and highly skilled job with tremendous responsibility since his report could make or break a company.
     
  16. Operator1975

    Operator1975

    Sep 24, 2010
    So I have seen double bit that measure say 6 inches from bit to bit called cruisers, say maybe 2 lbs if lucky, then seen double bits that measure 8 to 8 1/2 inches from bit to bit and approach 3 lbs also called cruisers - so where is the cutoff for "cruiser" distinction? Is there a cut off?
     
  17. Steve Tall

    Steve Tall

    Aug 28, 2010
    YesteryearsTools is in agreement with what's been posted here.

    cruiser: one who estimates the potential lumber yield from the standing timber on a specific tract of land and may mark out routes for accessing the area. (also: estimator)

    cruiser’s axe: a small version of a double bit axe designed to make markings by slashing the bark such as when blazing. (also: timber cruiser’s axe)

    quoted from
    http://www.yesteryearstools.com/Yesteryears%20Tools/Glossary%3A%20Axes,%20Edge%20Tools,%20etc..html
     
  18. Ballenxj

    Ballenxj

    Oct 30, 2010
    This thread has been very educational. Thanks to all that posted here. :cool:
    -Bruce
     
  19. OutdoorEnvy

    OutdoorEnvy

    308
    Nov 22, 2011
    I think if it's over 3lbs or over it's not a cruiser. Under 3lbs yes, regardless of head length but has to be a double bit. Don't know why anyone would call a single bit a cruiser?
     
  20. Sidehill Gouger

    Sidehill Gouger

    Dec 29, 2007
    Maybe because we used them cruising timber. :) Same goes for my time in the woods engineers of a major timber company. The standard "P-Line" axe on our survey crew was a single bit Collins 3/4.
     

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