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First Three Knives Done!

Discussion in 'Shop Talk - BladeSmith Questions and Answers' started by Stark Knives, Oct 23, 2013.

  1. Stark Knives

    Stark Knives KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Mar 19, 2010
    After a lot of work, I finally finished my first three knives from this thread.

    http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/showthread.php/1090264-My-Knife-Making-Journey-Advice-Would-Be-Greatly-Appreciated

    I can't really call one or another my first knife as I worked on them in a single batch but the rosewood handled one was my first one cut out.

    I used my 1 x 30 belt sander for shaping the blade, doing the bevels, the handles, and many other things. I also used a file and sandpaper to smoothen things out.

    The kydex sheaths are also my first try with making a sheath.

    Here they are!

    Knife #1

    Steel: 1084 from Aldo

    Handle material: Bocote

    Blade length: 3.25"

    Handle length: 4"

    Overall length: 7.25"

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    Knife #2:

    Blade steel: 1084 from Aldo

    Handle material: Bolivian rosewood with super glue finish (I will not be doing this again :p)

    Blade length: 3.75"

    Handle length: 4.2"

    Overall length: 7.95"

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    Here they are together:

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    Knife #3 (kitchen knife):

    Blade steel: 1084 from Aldo

    Handle material: Cocobolo

    Blade length: 9.25"

    Handle length: 4.5"

    Overall length: 13.75"

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    The handles on all of them are fully contoured. I made sure not to get "blocky handle syndrome" ;)

    Sorry for the overload of pictures, I'm just very proud of them.

    Any questions, comments, or critics would be greatly appreciated. :)
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2013
  2. i4Marc

    i4Marc KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Oct 19, 2011
    Helluva start! Love the way you shaped the handles. A few little cleanliness and attention to detail issues but you have to leave yourself someplace to grow right? Great job.
     
  3. Jason Arnold

    Jason Arnold

    131
    May 18, 2003
    Nice job. Useful blade profiles and thoughtful contours on those handles. Well done!
     
  4. Hengelo_77

    Hengelo_77 Basic Member Basic Member

    Mar 2, 2006
    nice work, now make more :)
    Personaly I prefer a hand sanded finish on blades.
     
  5. Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith

    Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith ilmarinen - MODERATOR Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 20, 2004
    Good start. The kitchen knife looks useful.

    On knife #1, the little tit sticking out behind the choil needs to be ground back. It must not stick out past the edge. Take it back about 0.10" more than the edge projects out.
    As you already know, you have some room for improvement in finishing and clean-up.
     
  6. Hesparus

    Hesparus

    Oct 31, 2004
    It looks like you're ahead of the curve. A couple of suggestions:
    1) The first two blades look a little bit wide for their size. You may find them to be more handy if you narrow the blades down.
    2) You blades all look fairly thick behind the edge. They will perform better if you bring them down to around 0.01" before you sharpen them. This is especially true for the kitchen knife. I don't know what style of knife you were going for, but what you made is going to be most suitable for fairly rough-use tasks. If you want a more general-purpose chef's knife then you'll want to thin the edge down to at least 0.008".

    - Chris
     
  7. Don Nguyen

    Don Nguyen

    Oct 4, 2011
    Great handle contouring.
     
  8. Marko3

    Marko3 Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 12, 2010
    Now that you made a few its time to pay attention to the finer details. I am a work in progress myself but I can give you a few pointers. On the next batch pull your handle back from your plunge. You want a little bit of steel there it looks more professional that way. Loose the Spanish notch as well. Your handles are way better than what I was showing on my first three or four or even ten.

    So keep trying to better yourself. And take it from me you can have a string of a few decent knives and then go into a tailspin and have to throw a few away but don't beat yourself up and just learn from every knife.
     
  9. The Warrior

    The Warrior Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 11, 2011
    Nice work. :thumbup:
     
  10. Stark Knives

    Stark Knives KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Mar 19, 2010
    1. I agree that the blade may be a little wide, but that is the height of the steel I had and it would've taken much more hand work to narrow them down. They still work great though.

    2. I actually think they're pretty thin behind the edge, they're almost a zero convex grind. I need to do some testing and see how they perform, but I definitely think they are not way to thick.

    Thanks so much everyone!
     
  11. sicily02

    sicily02

    Nov 23, 2005
    WOW, they look awesome. Great job.

    Bryan
     
  12. Omega Leather Works

    Omega Leather Works

    Jun 13, 2007
    The handles look comfy. Kinda reminiscent of Gavkoo and Ferrum Forge. :)
     
  13. Bfusmc03117

    Bfusmc03117

    697
    Dec 29, 2008
    Wow very nice looking pieces! Great job!
     
  14. mainaman

    mainaman Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 14, 2009
    The kitchen knife is very thick behind the edge and will not cut well unless significantly thinned.
    I like the blade shape though.
     
  15. Stark Knives

    Stark Knives KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Mar 19, 2010
    Thanks again for HTing them and giving me advice Bryan!
    I watch all of Gavkoo's video so I probably got some inspiration from them. :)

    I haven't fully tested it yet because I want to show a few people before it gets a patina, but I cut one tomato and could get see-through slices so it may just be the picture...
     
  16. Omega Leather Works

    Omega Leather Works

    Jun 13, 2007
    I meant Fiddleback not Ferrum. :cool:
     
  17. Stark Knives

    Stark Knives KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Mar 19, 2010
    Ah, I was wondering, I thought Ferrum made more folders than fixed. I actually got most of my inspiration from Fiddleback. :)
     
  18. Don Nguyen

    Don Nguyen

    Oct 4, 2011
    A tomato is a good test for how sharp the edge is, but it moves away from the geometry of the blade easily. Something like a potato, which is more dense and stiff, would be a good judge to determine if the grind is thin enough.
     
  19. Stark Knives

    Stark Knives KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Mar 19, 2010
    Do you have any other good tests? For the non kitchen knives too?
     
  20. Hesparus

    Hesparus

    Oct 31, 2004
    The best test for any knife is to use them a lot for the purpose which they were intended. For kitchen knives, cutting tomatoes is a good measure of sharpness and cutting potatoes (or any other stiff, thick material) is a good measure of geometry. But the only way to really get an idea of how good the knife is is to use it in the kitchen every day for the whole range of things that it is designed to be used for. Chop all kinds of vegetables, mince herbs, slice raw and cooked meats of all kinds. Try using it instead of a paring knife — it will perform poorly, but then you'll know. Lend it to someone else and have them try it for a while (sometimes it's hard to be objective when it comes to our own knives). Compare how it performs in all manner of tasks to other knives.
    For EDC knives, carry them every day and use them for everything.
    Make more knives and change various aspects of them and then compare them to the rest of the ones you've made.

    - Chris
     

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