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Hatchet sharpening angle degrees

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by mobenzowner, Nov 30, 2012.

  1. mobenzowner

    mobenzowner

    402
    Oct 17, 2010
    I am pretty good at sharpening knives and can do an adequate job on axes etc. What I need help on is what would be a good primary and secondary angle degree for normal use (mostly cutting, but some very light splitting) on a plumb boy scout hatchet. I would also appreciate any info on bevel width etc(although I know much of this is decided by the angle degree used). I was given the hatchet yesterday and want to tune her up this weekend.
    Thanks to all in advance.
    Kevin
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2012
  2. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    I've posted this before but I don't mind sharing it again. It's an axe sharpening gauge from the U.S. Forest Service publication 'An Ax to Grind'.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. mobenzowner

    mobenzowner

    402
    Oct 17, 2010
    Thanks Peg and I have seen this post. I just felt that a hand axe should probably be profiled a little different than a felling axe. I actually mad an axe bit guage by putting 2 hack saw blades together so I could roughly check my bevel angles. Since I was going to use this little hand axe mainly for cutting but also for light splitting I was thinking a primary bevel of 30° with a secondary bevel of 50° might be the way to go. For a larger felling type axe I have read a primary bevel of 25° and a secondary bevel of 35° is a pretty common way to go. Opinions anyone?
     
  4. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    I think that 50 ° is way too fat for a hatchet. If anything I'd make a hatchet edge a little thinner than an axe edge. It doesn't need to stand up to the heavy impacts that an axe sees.

    I don't do primary/secondary on my axes, rather I roll the edge down to my final bevel in a convex curve. My favorite carving hatchet has a 25° bevel. I think you could go as shallow as 20°.
     
  5. mobenzowner

    mobenzowner

    402
    Oct 17, 2010
    Thanks a bunck square_peg! I really appreciate your advice.
    Kevin
     
  6. John Frankl

    John Frankl

    Oct 16, 2001
    Thanks for the picture. I'd like to make up a couple sharpening gauges out of thin steel stock. Any idea what the correct measurements are for length and width of the original picture to get the right size?
     
  7. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    The white field inside the border is 3-3/8" x 5-1/2" in the print version of 'An Ax to Grind'. I have a copy sitting here right in front of me thanks to Moosecreektrails.
     
  8. Operator1975

    Operator1975

    Sep 24, 2010
    Pegs nailed it with the pic and then also with the notion of your first angle should probably be around 25-28 degrees.

    I have never used a caliper, gauge, etc. Just keep on keepin on, you will know what is what, what is right, what is wrong. When you swing it will also tell you.

    Remember, if in question, leave thick, you can always take away, but you can't put back on.

    Great thread.

    Thanks!

    Mike
     
  9. John Frankl

    John Frankl

    Oct 16, 2001
    Thank you. Seems small, but I guess that makes it convenient to carry.

    I'm going to make a couple soon.
     

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