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Is 1084fg for me?

Discussion in 'Shop Talk - BladeSmith Questions and Answers' started by shane wink, Jul 21, 2012.

  1. shane wink

    shane wink

    288
    Sep 14, 2010
    I am looking for experiences with 1084fg from Aldo for use in a series of bushcraft knives. 3-4- 6.5" blades 1-8 -5/32- 3/16ths spines 6.5 to 12" overall. The reason for asking is I am looking for toughness as well as wear resistance. I have used O1 on the small skinners and have not had any issues but I have heard good things about the 1084fg, so how does it compare to O1 or 5160?

    I am rough on my knives as in hammering in wooden snare stakes, making one stick fires, chopping, etc which is why I was looking at the 1084fg. The price and heat treat are both nice as well but I am using a HT oven so correct temp is not an issue as it would be in a forge. I do plan to use PBC or satanite as the coating instead of foil.
     
  2. Daniel Fairly Knives

    Daniel Fairly Knives Full Time Knifemaker Moderator

    Jan 9, 2011
    I have had great customer feedback on 1084 bushcraft knives, it has great qualities for most any kind of knife.

    No need for foil on any carbon steel, in fact I think that would be counterproductive. I don't even use a coating and it comes out of thee kiln and quench pretty clean for a carbon steel.

    Don't let the ease of heat treat fool you, 1084 is top notch material.
     
  3. SBuzek

    SBuzek KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Dec 7, 2006
    I have taken a 6" clip point blade from aldo's 1084 and driven it through a 2X4 with a 3 lb hammer.Held up fine.
    It will make a good bushcraft knife.
    Stan
     
  4. Remyrw

    Remyrw

    Jun 17, 2010
    +1. Very tough, easy to work with, plenty hard for field use without being a bear to sharpen by hand. It's a great bushcraft steel.
     
  5. shane wink

    shane wink

    288
    Sep 14, 2010
    Sounds like its time to order some up and give it a try. Thanks
     
  6. wolffbite

    wolffbite

    May 7, 2010
    I'm putting in an order soon with aldo and it includes several lengths of 1084, so many good reviews of it I have to find out what the hype is about!
     
  7. sunshadow

    sunshadow

    Oct 2, 2006
    Not hype just great steel

    -Page
     
  8. AVigil

    AVigil knifemaker working the grind Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Platinum Member

    Feb 17, 2009
    +1 for the 1084.

    These 2 are of 1084 and their brother took a beating in the testing and I am now a true believer :)



    [​IMG]
     
  9. Mitchell Knives

    Mitchell Knives Knifemaker Moderator

    May 21, 2000
    1084 is a great steel that will work well for any knife project.
     
  10. shane wink

    shane wink

    288
    Sep 14, 2010
    Avigil those two cord wrapped beauties are sick man! Thanks for posting them. Is that a turks or larks head capping off the cord wrap?
     
  11. shane wink

    shane wink

    288
    Sep 14, 2010
     
  12. SBuzek

    SBuzek KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Dec 7, 2006
    I coat my 1084 blades with a light wash of satinite,it actually increases the speed of the quench plus provides some protection from decarb.

    Stan
     
  13. wolffbite

    wolffbite

    May 7, 2010
    Hype was a poor word to choose. I need to find out what I've been missing this whole time :D
     
  14. AVigil

    AVigil knifemaker working the grind Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Platinum Member

    Feb 17, 2009
    Thanks EA :)

    That is a Turks head I made from a cord I got at REI camping. It is "Utility Cord" it is very strong, does not stretch like paracord nor flatten. It makes a nice "Hard" guard on this style.

    I spent hours learning how to do the Turks head.... they can be a little tricky :)
     
  15. Remyrw

    Remyrw

    Jun 17, 2010
    personally, I find that a little vinegar and finishing up my grinding post ht is a heck of a lot easier and cheaper than a coating or foil during heat treat. But that would really depend on your work flow I guess. I tend to HT at the end of the day and leave them in vinegar overnight then do the rest of the work the next day. Then a third day for handles after the epoxy has cured overnight. Since it's not like I'd be doing any more work that day anyway, leaving them in vinegar rather than having them looking nice already is no delay. I'd still want to do my final grinding post HT due to the odds of a little warping going on during HT.
     
  16. shane wink

    shane wink

    288
    Sep 14, 2010
    Avigil I tie a turks head for making paracord beads on pace counters and lanyards. You just added something to my to-do list man!
     
  17. jawilder

    jawilder

    Jun 27, 2006
    Shane, I use 1084 on everything but kitchen knives, although I'm sure it would make a great kitchen knife. Let me know if you have any questions about it.
     
  18. frc505

    frc505

    684
    Jun 12, 2010
    Whats everyones opinion on final
    Hardness for 1084 ? I was told Rc59
    Was best ! Where do you like yours
    At ?

    Frank
     
  19. claymoore

    claymoore Banned BANNED

    186
    Dec 25, 2011
    Nice knives. How do you wrap these like that? What is it called and is there a sticky? It looks like two different wraps. Thanks
     
  20. Remyrw

    Remyrw

    Jun 17, 2010
    frc, it's going to vary depending on the knife. Mind you, it's a small difference, 1084's a pretty consistent steel and you don't have a big hardness range to play with. If you want harder or softer you go with different steels. Personally, I think 58/59 is probably all you'll get from properly heat treated 1084. You might go as low as 57 but I doubt you'll see 60 without edge chipping issues under real use. The temper range for 1084 in knife use doesn't exactly produce a huge spread in hardness.
     

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