is an old plumb hand axe any good

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by jpknives919, May 18, 2017.

  1. jpknives919

    jpknives919

    38
    Apr 17, 2017
    recently i bought my a an old hand axe at a yard sale for 50 cents because it was rusted on the surfice the people didnt think they could sell it for much more so i got a good deal on that and an indian made knife with a beautiful carved sheath which also had a little sufice rust. it was too good of a deal to pass up to toys for a dollar. after i got the rust out of the axe i noticed the name PLUMB written in big letters. so is this just a plain roofers axe that rusted over or is it made with good steel. if it old do yall think the head was forge welded in as ive heard they used to do because of metal shortiges. and if it is welded in how can i tell. ALSO when i was working on it i noticed that there was some kind of heavy cote of some kind on it. i think it is bees wax but am not sure how to tell.

    any help is appriciated
     
  2. 300Six

    300Six

    Aug 29, 2013
    During the glory days of Plumb (before they were taken over by Ames in the 70s and then by Cooper Tools in 1980s) they were known for using excellent steel and top notch manufacturing processes. A vintage Plumb roofing hammer or hatchet will not be weld construction. You'll be hard pressed to find equivalent quality in a new version of such a tool today.
     
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  3. garry3

    garry3

    Sep 11, 2012
    Most folks think they have a roofing axe nine times out of ten it ends up being a half hatchet. If you can post pictures it would be most helpful.
    Plumb quit welding bits pretty early. Back in the teens. They used a proprietary steel that is very good. The vintage stuff is indeed premium quality.
     
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  4. Woodcraft

    Woodcraft Gold Member Gold Member

    796
    Nov 7, 2016
    Old plumb axes are my favorite to use.
     
  5. Hickory n steel

    Hickory n steel

    Feb 11, 2016
    Yep, it's usually a half hatchet, a riggers axe, or a lathing hatchet.
     
  6. 300Six

    300Six

    Aug 29, 2013
    You know, like, 'who cares'. I distinctly remember rookie (myself included) constructo-wannabees of the 1970s wondering what drywall hatchets were all about (markedly offset head and face) but no one questioned whether the 'tool crib relic' they were tasked to use was a half/riggers/lathing or roofing hatchet.
    You are correct though in asking for a photo. Heaven knows there might even be a ship's anchor in the Plumb stamp!
     
  7. Hickory n steel

    Hickory n steel

    Feb 11, 2016
    My thought was that in learning that their tool isn't exactly what they thought it was and learning that there are other types of carpentry / trades type hatchets it may spark a deeper interest than they may have initially had.
    I don't think there's anything wrong with potentially calling a tool the wrong name.
     
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  8. garry3

    garry3

    Sep 11, 2012
    And they have little in common with one another....
     
  9. Gator39

    Gator39

    72
    May 13, 2017
    As a 'newbie' myself to the rich American history of axes and hatchets, I very much appreciate the wisdom shared by the guys with the knowledge.
    And the CORRECT terminology is fundamental to learning that history.
     
  10. jpknives919

    jpknives919

    38
    Apr 17, 2017
    sorry i havent replied sooner guys theres been alot of deaths in my comunity. as far as putting a picture of my hatchet thing ive tried to get an acount with multiple places that enable me to post pictures on here but none worke for some reason they all say that something errored. and im pretty sure its a roofing hatchet because i use them all the time building fences
     

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