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knife buffer/sharpener

Discussion in 'Maintenance, Tinkering & Embellishment' started by rctk1, Feb 25, 2006.

  1. rctk1

    rctk1 Gold Member Gold Member

    909
    Mar 5, 2005
  2. cbwx34

    cbwx34 Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 27, 2004
    It works great.... but you can buy a grinder from Sears (variable speed if you want, but you'll find that the wheels actually work better faster (less vibration) and are rated for the higher speed)... by the wheels from anyone of several sources... and pocket about $70-$120 (depending on the grinder you get).
     
  3. rctk1

    rctk1 Gold Member Gold Member

    909
    Mar 5, 2005
    wouldnt the higher speed damage the blade? i wanted the slower speed to prevent ruining the temper. thanks
     
  4. neitron

    neitron

    133
    Oct 1, 2004
    good idea about the temper. i've baked a couple knives in my time. just frustrating. i only use the belt grinder because its fast, and rarely on knives that i've paid for myself. to have a knife ready to go in less than a minute is handy. i always prefer a stone at home though.
     
  5. Bilker

    Bilker

    149
    Dec 13, 2003
    Buffing and polish wheels will not build up heat anywhere near as quick as actual grinding wheels will. A 1/4 hp motor will bog down very quickly if too much force is applied. I routinely use a 1 hp motor with 3600 rpm. For buffing, carboard wheels (8") with 800 to 1200 grit and cloth wheels with various rouge for polish. The cloth wheel has to be a good one so as not to come apart at 3600 rpm. I always keep a small tray of fresh room temp. water near to keep the blade cool if needed, which is not often. Of the five grinding/buffing motors I use only one store bought. The others I made from washer/dryer/hvac motors and went to Sears to get the size arbors needed. Very good wheels can be had for reasonable prices from a lapidary supply shop. A 1hp motor is a little overkill as a 1/2 or 3/4 hp. will do fine also, it's just that I have some heavy grinding to do now and then and a 1 hp. is much faster.

    Good luck!
     
  6. cbwx34

    cbwx34 Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 27, 2004
    No... it doesn't. The wheel comes with a coating that reduces heat build up... as long as you keep the knife moving, there's no problem. I've never had one get more than warm to the touch.

    If you're that concerned... get the variable speed grinder. You'll still be $$ ahead, and you'll see what I mean about how the wheels 'wobble' at the slower speed.
     
  7. D_R_Sharpening

    D_R_Sharpening Banned by Moderators

    157
    Dec 23, 2005
    I have that exact buffer and it's used with paper wheels.

    [​IMG]

    *Note - the motor is turned around so that the wheels spin away from me but the switch is still in the front.


    It's a Baldor and it's got mucho torque so that's not at issue.

    Even though the buffer itself runs incredibly smooth the paper wheels never do no matter what brand or how much you balance them.

    At the lower 1800 rpm they will wobble a bit and they sharpen and polish slower. I bought the same set up (from another source) thinking the lower speed would be better for heat control. I also thought that these wheels would work at the same speeds that a buffing wheel would. Over time I've found that all the manufacturers recommend using a 3450 rpm grinder (or buffer if you prefer) with their paper wheels. This must be for a reason.

    The deal being offered (on ebay) most likely can be met (and maybe even beat) from knifemaker supply houses. Look around before committing. I would head cbwx34's advice and look into that variable speed grinder as you can have the best of both worlds. Probably cheaper too. ;)


    --Dave--
     
  8. frugalweaver

    frugalweaver

    112
    Jul 3, 2005
    I had a stainless steel spindle made at a local machine shop. I have a 12 x 1 inch grinding stone with water drip on one end and a leather buffing wheel on the other end. I have a step pulley so I can change the speed easily without spending big money for variable speed 1 horse motor. The whole set up cost me less than $100 but I did some scrounging and trading so it would have been a good bit more if bought outright. I'm pretty happy with it and use it for everything from touching up pocket knives to shaping hand planer blades and wood lathe tools. I even sharpen my ax, adz and Kaiser blade with it.
     
  9. rctk1

    rctk1 Gold Member Gold Member

    909
    Mar 5, 2005
  10. Bill DeShivs

    Bill DeShivs KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jun 6, 2000
    They will fit if you order the correct spindle size. You will need to remove the guards probably.
    Bill
     
  11. rctk1

    rctk1 Gold Member Gold Member

    909
    Mar 5, 2005
    is spindle size the same as arbor size? sorry for the ignorance i am not familiar with this type of equipment. thanks
     
  12. Bilker

    Bilker

    149
    Dec 13, 2003
    I wouldn't see why not. Most wheels are available with arbor sleeve adapters to fit the most common arbor sizes.
     
  13. D_R_Sharpening

    D_R_Sharpening Banned by Moderators

    157
    Dec 23, 2005

    The link you attched is for an 8" grinder. I would go with a 6" grinder and 8" wheels. This will give you proper handle/knuckle clearance from the motor housing.

    http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?pid=00921154000&BV_UseBVCookie=Yes&vertical=TOOL&cs=ALT


    I don't know if these wheel guards come off or not but most grinder guards do. This is important. I also dont know what the arbor (spindle) size is but most 6" grinders have 1/2" arbors and most paper wheels are 5/8" but come with spacers. If you plan on sharpening from the top of the wheels (wheels spinning away from you - moor reversed) than that handle has to be able to come off also.



    --Dave--
     
  14. D_R_Sharpening

    D_R_Sharpening Banned by Moderators

    157
    Dec 23, 2005
  15. D_R_Sharpening

    D_R_Sharpening Banned by Moderators

    157
    Dec 23, 2005
    Just a note - There are many brands of paper wheels and I think I've used all but one. The wheels I like the best are the ones from "Razor Sharp Edgemaking"


    --Dave--
     
  16. rctk1

    rctk1 Gold Member Gold Member

    909
    Mar 5, 2005
  17. D_R_Sharpening

    D_R_Sharpening Banned by Moderators

    157
    Dec 23, 2005
    It's tough for me to get a feel fo the size of the motor housing and I'm suspect of it because it's 1/2hp and they're usually a little big for 8" wheels. The spacing between the wheels looks good though.

    If you have a Sears near you it might be wise to pop in and see them in person.


    --Dave--
     
  18. cbwx34

    cbwx34 Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 27, 2004
    I have used the wheels from "Razor Sharp Edgemaking" on the 6 in. grinder mentioned in Dave's post. The guards come off easily, and in fact, by removing a couple of bolts, you can flip the grinder around on its base, so the wheels turn away, and the switch and light are in the right position. No other modification is needed. The wheels come with a bushing so they will fit the grinder.
     
  19. bigbcustom

    bigbcustom

    Dec 20, 2005
    Anybody have one of the cheap harbor frieght grinders??? buffers??? are they any good, I have looked at them, but haven't bought for fear of quality. I would love a big baldor, but the price is more than I can justify for the use I would give it.
     
  20. rctk1

    rctk1 Gold Member Gold Member

    909
    Mar 5, 2005

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