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Lower grit sharpening stone

Discussion in 'Maintenance, Tinkering & Embellishment' started by Erazorhead, Sep 21, 2013.

  1. Erazorhead

    Erazorhead

    5
    Sep 18, 2013
    First post here... sorry if this topic has been discuss at lenght before...

    I come from the straight razor side of the blade hobby. I own a belgian coticule (around 8K) and a chinese stone (around 12K) to maintain the edge on my straight razors. I do have CrOx powder, a red paste and strops.

    I bought a Buck Vantage Avid and I was wondering if a DMT double sided (Fine and Extra Fine) diamond stone will cover my needs regarding pocket knife sharpening. I have already refined the edge of my Buck on my coticule and leather CrOx strop but since I never had the need for lower grit stone, I am a little lost...

    By the way, is the belgian coticule popular among knife's enthusiasts?
     
  2. Cynic2701

    Cynic2701

    Mar 31, 2009
    Diamonds seem to be a good choice for the "typical" highly wear resistant knife steels in pocket knives nowadays. They work - consistently - regardless of whether you are sharpening 1095 or S90V.

    If I recall correctly, the Buck Avid is 13C26. You could use coarser waterstones like a Shapton 1000 or other popular 1000 grit waterstones as well.

    I don't hear much about belgian coticule being used for pocket knives--mostly kitchen knives and straight razors. Since pocket knives typically don't have the edge geometry of a good Japanese kitchen knife, they frequently may need to be re-beveled if you are used to much more acute angles.
     
  3. Magnaminous_G

    Magnaminous_G

    Jul 13, 2011
    DMT F/XF is good, but do you have a coarser stone to reprofile or set bevels?
     
  4. Erazorhead

    Erazorhead

    5
    Sep 18, 2013
    Thanks for the reply.

    I don't have coarser grit than my coticule... I am looking for a budget minded option. I thought than DMT plates would be nice but they seem fairly aggressive and unforgivable to learn on. But they don't need lapping.
     
  5. Erazorhead

    Erazorhead

    5
    Sep 18, 2013
    I thought the Fine would serve as a coarser stone to set the bevel and remove small chip.
     
  6. Jason B.

    Jason B. KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jun 13, 2007
    Maybe on a razor but not on a knife.

    It would be wise to purchase the coarse/fine instead. With most knives a c/f is all you need and a light stropping after a fine diamond will provide a very sharp and useful edge.
     
  7. Erazorhead

    Erazorhead

    5
    Sep 18, 2013
    Thanks for the heads up. I'll be looking for the DMT coarse/fine plate then. As a bonus, the coarse side will serve as a lapping plate for my coticule and chinese stone!
     
  8. Jason B.

    Jason B. KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jun 13, 2007
    Only the XXC DMT is given the green light for lapping. You will quickly wear or ruin a coarse DMT if used as a lapping stone.
     
  9. Erazorhead

    Erazorhead

    5
    Sep 18, 2013
    Guys over straigthrazorplace have done it for decade... You have to do it under running water, keep the pressure low, and don't built a slurry on the hone. If things start to clog up, the diamond will be destroyed for sure. Some guys did had problems but the story doesn't tell how they did it... I know that it's a sound advice though, so I'll keep an eye open and procede carefully.
     
  10. unit

    unit

    Nov 22, 2009
    No offense, but this (2nd) statement is wrong. I won't argue that a person cannot ruin a DMT coarse, but unless you are speaking relative to geologic time, using a DMT 8C for lapping will not quickly ruin it unless you are doing something wrong.
     

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